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Domino Jointers Are they really worth it, or just a gimic

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Distinterior

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I've never cut a Domino mortice with a DF700, hence my question.....

With the Seneca adapter fitted to the DF700, do you have to use it upside down in the same way as you would if the similar adaptor Seneca offer was fitted to the DF500...??

The reason I ask is, the balance of my DF500 is really nice and ergonomic, so I would imagine it must feel rather odd operating either tool with these adapters fitted.
 

hugov

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I bought a DF500 last year, and like others here I ummmed and aahhed about that versus a DF700 versus perhaps a biscuit jointer for a big kitchen cabinets project.

My research lead me to conclude that biscuit jointer would really only be useful to me for panel glue-ups as an alignment aide (they don't seem to add strength), but I find I can get perfectly fine edge glued joints without one. I don't think it'd speed things up either (for me).

Conversely, the Domino replaced dowels and mostly replaced screws for me, mostly in applications that I couldn't have used a biscuit anyway, and even if I could have, I wouldn't have trusted the resulting joint strength.

For me, it has enabled two things that probably earn the label, "game changer".

Firstly, I'm quite lazy, and the Domino is faster than alternative joints most of the time making it much easier for me to do things properly and accurately. (Example: last weekend I made a simple plywood box to house some automated irrigation bits in the garden – screws would have done the job fine but I used dominos since that was faster and resulted in a cleaner and more accurate box ... not that it needed to be in this case!) Secondly, I can dry assemble and disassemble complex assemblies using Dominos quickly and easily, and they're fairly rigid when dry assembled. This (perhaps combined with the laziness :) has greatly improved the joinery results and accuracy I'm achieving.

As for 500 vs 700, the ergonomics were the main thing for me. I didn't have any immediate use for 12 or 14mm tenons, and knew I'd use the smaller and easier to handle tool a lot more than something bulky, heavy and ungainly. The ergonomics are really good – I especially like the "system" aspects, sharing the plug-it cable and extractor hose with my track saw (my only other Festool product), in fact enough that I'm now considering replacing my hand held router with a Festool for that reason.
 

JobandKnock

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The DF500 isn't bad to use with a Domiplate. It takes a bit of getting used to, but the speed gains when doing boxes and carcasses make it very worthwhile for the tradesman.
 

Spectric

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What is this 'Seneca' add-on you talk about please?
I have and use the Senaca one for 6mm cutters, cannot see me going any smaller and it works great, I never exceed 25mm depth with this little cutter, and for me the bigger 700 is used more with 10 & 12 mm dominos but Festool would prefer I buy a 500 as well. I think the domain for the 500 is with the MDF cabinet brigade where the 28mm max depth is ok but I like the ability to go 70mm on the 700.

With the adaptor you can use it with a domi plate, the normal fence or an FC tools plate as it makes no odds, just allows the smaller cutters to be used in the larger machine.
 

Jake

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OK but if it's an issue they don't take up much floor space - much like a pillar drill. Not very mobile though.
They also only do the mortice. The loose tenon of a domino might be inferior over the very long term (although there's an argument the multiple tenon it enables with much less effort is better with more glue surface) but with modern glues rather than boiled up fish and bone how many decades are are we talking about before we see the betterness?

A domino joint (even a multiple one) is quicker to mark up and then it is zip zip, joint done both sides.

I love to love tradition, but I'm probably going to sell my little morticer as it is just gathering dust.

In a pro situation with large numbers of repeat joints, pre-sets on a double headed tenoner and a morticer, I'd use that instead, it would feel more right.

That's not the domino target though.
 

NormanB

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£4.5k - £5k for a bike!- Sounds like the Festool of ebikes! :whistle:
My son thinks I’m mad spending so much on the Domino. If I chose to sell it I figure I would achieve good resale value.
I think he is mad replacing his iPhone every time a new model comes out, he is currently on the larger format iPhone 12 and gets a very poor trade in value on his old handset (especially if I buy it.😉).

It’s only money (and it’s your hard earned) and people’s needs and wants are very different. It’s certainly not going to earn much in the bank.
 

JobandKnock

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My son thinks I’m mad spending so much on the Domino. If I chose to sell it I figure I would achieve good resale value.
I think he is mad replacing his iPhone every time a new model comes out, he is currently on the larger format iPhone 12 and gets a very poor trade in value on his old handset (especially if I buy it.😉).
The main difference between a 6 year old iPhone in seemingly good nick and a Domino in good nick is that the iPhone is worth next to nothing (and probably doesn't work any longer) whilst the Domino is probably still worth 70 to 80% of its' original sticker price if not more. No wonder Peter Millard reckons his has cost him nothing

I seriously never considered that until it was pointed out to me in a video. I have always just thought in terms of writing stuff down over 3 to 5 years and the replacing as required
 
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