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Adam W.

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Had some rabbit skin glue made up so decided to do a bit of work on my long term tool chest project. So first go at veneering with some red madrone Vavona burr on the till fronts.

Used the folded brass back of my saw as a veneer hammer.

It was a bit brittle, but it should look passable with some french polish.

IMG_0453.JPG
 
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bob543

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Had some rabbit skin glue made up so decided to do a bit of work on my long term tool chest project. So first go at veneering with some red madrone burr on the till fronts.

Used the folded brass back of my saw as a veneer hammer.

It was a bit brittle, but it should look passable with some french polish.

View attachment 112154
How did the rabbit glue do at the hammer veneering? I was putting brazilian rosewood veneer on an old wood case the other week but used pearl glue.Not done this kind of veneering before and found it quite difficult, Heres a photo of my 1/2 hour to make hammer.
 

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Adam W.

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How did the rabbit glue do at the hammer veneering? I was putting brazilian rosewood veneer on an old wood case the other week but used pearl glue.Not done this kind of veneering before and found it quite difficult, Heres a photo of my 1/2 hour to make hammer.
I thought it went OK, but tomorrow may well provide a different story.

I slathered it on quite liberally, rubbed it down with my hands and squeegeed it off with the back of my tenon saw.

There was a good Steve Latta video on youtube about it, but it's gone now. Which is a shame, as he's got a no nonsense approach.

Here it is: The Woodwright's Shop | Hammer Veneering with Steve Latta | Season 31 | Episode 10

I hope it stays on, as I think it's going to look pretty wild when it's done.
 
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ian33a

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This looks great. Could you describe how you made it? Are then mft tops ready made or did you do them?
Hi Mike,

The bench is actually from a suite of videos and plans created by the WoodGrafter. I've posted a link to a summary of the bench

I built this bench for less than £200!!! - YouTube .

While it is possible to build it for this amount, I chose rather nicer wood and better MFT tops and the build cost was considerably more. As I see it, the bench is extremely sturdy and should last for decades and is worth the cost.

I bought all of the timber rough sawn and milled it myself. The top is a laminate with 32 pieces and the legs and stretchers are all joined with mortice and tenon joints. The bottom shelves are Medite water resistant MDF. The MFT inserts are Valchromat. The MFT's were cut and drilled by me and formed using The Parf II system. The 96mm grid extends contiguously across both inserts.

My last mortice and tenon joint was done over 40 years ago and my woodworking capability was very basic before embarking on this project. It was to be my lockdown challenge for 2021. I'm really rather pleased with it.
 

Adam W.

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Well, it's still attached and I've put a couple of coats of shellac on it. I'll rub it down next week when it's hard and French polish it.

There's a couple of little errors and a tiny chip which I'll repair, but all in all, I'm quite happy with my first attempt at veneer and I may do some more on the next mahogany chest I've got on the go.


IMG_0454.JPG
 

Cooper

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Now I have to figure out hw to thickness it with limited hand-tools
Well done Dr Phill. I do a bit of this as I don't have a bandsaw or planer. I find that if I saw reasonably acuratly, then plane one side and edge flat and square its possible mark out and cut sets of dovetails and groves etc to make a box and when its all glued up plane the outside smooth, then saw the top off. I get a result before I'm completely exhausted and demoralised this way. If I planed both sides before starting the box I'd give up. I find it really satisfying thinking that I made something and saved a log from the fire! I haven't bought any timber for ages.
 

DrPhill

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Thanks Cooper - at least I am not the only one....

....... I find that if I saw reasonably acuratly, then plane one side and edge flat and square.....
There's the rub. I am not sure if my technique is up to it yet. I wanted a flat piece to practice carving and got a little carried away. Next time I will try for a bit more accuracy - holding the log is a problem - I use the picnic bench as I can saw down between the slats of the seat. Is there a better choice of saw (I am using a coarse 'draper venom')?
 

Cooper

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Is there a better choice of saw (I am using a coarse 'draper venom')?
There may indeed be a better saw but I don't have one. I have a very cheap panel saw, with induction hardened teeth. I'm lucky that I have a big engineer's vice that I can hold the log upright in. I cut down as far as I can and then risk the end by splitting. I am even more lucky as I have a bench with a woodworking vice, in which I can hold the board and I can saw down the middle of it so I have two bits half the thickness.
Its a bit of a technique and very tiring for an old bloke but being retired I have time to recover. Like you, I find the spaces between the slats of the garden table very useful, though not for converting logs but for cutting sheet materials.

The pictures were a very sad old cherry log I rescued from a friends firewood stack. (Looking at the pictures I see I could have planed a bit more to remove the knifed shoulder lines.) Boxes are quite hard work. My old lathe has an appetite for logs, which requires far less effort on my part. The body of the duck was a chunk from the end of the same log. (The head was a bit of tent pole.) As I said I haven't bought any wood for a long time.
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