Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Some helpful advice please

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

A

Anonymous

Guest
I have managed to pursued my good Lady wife that a wood turning lathe would be a very useful addition to the workshop :twisted: The only criteria is that I am not to exceed £300 as a budget. Any ideas? :idea: Of course I am looking to get as much as possible, but I don't want a heap of rubbish. A chuck would be nice I think but I am a novice :? so give me low-down. Be honest. I can take it :lol:
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Hello Eric, welcome to the forum. Not sure we can guarantee helpful advice mind...

£300 budget eh? Hmm, might need to get creative here... First up, have a trawl through some of the back threads on here if you haven't already. You'll see two recurring bits of advice. 1. Get a copy of "Woodturning, A foundation course" by Keith Rowley and 2. You'll get more lathe/chuck/tools for your pound/euro/buck if you can go secondhand. I don't know if you've already got safety gear, a grinder, abrasives, finishes etc? If not, you're really going to have to make that budget stretch. :( One good piece of news; you can get away without buying a chuck very well. I've been turning for 4 or 5 years now, not an avid turner mind you, and still haven't felt the need to get one. Anyway, let's have a go:

Book: See above £17
Lathe: Perform CCL £170 (just like my Delta, which is fine, but cheaper. Drat :( )
Tools: Perform set of 6. I know they always say "don't buy tools in sets", but this is really a pretty good one and well reviewed. A bargain at the price. £60
Safety visor: like this or similar £7
Sharpening: This can get expensive. At the least you need a reasonable grinder, a good rest and probably a gouge grinding jig. For the latter I went with the Sorby one, but it's a ghastly £40 odd :shock: About the same price as my grinder in fact... If you don't have a grinder either, then you could be looking at near £100 on the sharpening stuff alone.
Workholding: A drill chuck is vital IMO, so I went with a good one with a drawbar and nut so I could use it as a mini chuck too. Peter Child is the place for these. Also their face plate is excellent in all respects. But those two would set you back about £48 :cry: I have a feeling we're getting over budget... One other thing I decided was worth the investment was a cone friction drive at £13. This is a real boon when you're starting; instead of the wood snatching the tool from your grasp if you "catch" (which you will), the work simply stops turning. Worth every penny as far as I'm concerned.

Hmm, I'll stop there 'cos not including the sharpening we've gone over the £300 mark. And that doesn't allow for abrasives, finishes, or wood! :cry: You could knock back the lathe a bit and get the Perform CCSL instead, but it's capacities aren't so good. Oh well, it gives you some stuff to consider anyway. I should start combing the local paper and classified ads in the woodworking mags for a set of lathe, tools, chuck etc going secondhand if I was you :D

Cheers, Alf
 

trevtheturner

Established Member
Joined
26 Feb 2003
Messages
1,144
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire, UK.
Agree with all you say, Alf, but Eric did say his budget was up to £300 for a lathe. So, provided he stays within budget for his lathe, he should them be able to convince SWMBO that he really has to have all the other essential gear you mention to enable him to use his new machine! :twisted: :twisted: :wink:

Welcome, Eric, and best of luck with the new venture.

Trev.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I would like to thank you guys for taking the time to reply in such depth. Most helpful. :) . I like the way you're thinking Trevor :twisted: . I do have some items, grinder, visor etc. I keep coming across information and comments about "cheap chinese copies" So I'm a little nervous about going in for s/hand without a bit of experience. I have just purchased a Kity combi wood working machine :p and I was tempted at the time to buy a Charnwood lathe at about £230. It seemed quiet and smooth. Could it be from the Orient? :? Who knows?

Thanks again guys.

Eric

ps. Do you think a big Valentines Prezzie may increase the budget :twisted:
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Blimey Trev, didn't know you had such an evil streak! I almost feel sory for your SWMBO :D

Eric, I don't know for sure, but I'm willing to take a small bet that the Charnwood will be Chiwanese. Practically all the starter type lathes are I think. You need to look for a couple of things. Firstly avoid anything with a single tube type bed; personally I think the cast beds of the Perform and similar clones are the best, but lots of people seem to have no complaints about the Record twin rod style. Secondly, if you're looking secondhand, as well as listening to the motor, checking belts etc, run the tailstock up to the head stock (centres in both) and see that they line up. Ooo, that reminds me. One of the advantages of the Perform et al is the variable speed. Not only does it remove that annoying belt changing, but because you have to start them at their slowest speed there's no danger of running a large or awkward blank too fast and seeing it fly across the workshop (if you're lucky).

Cheers, Alf
 

Cutting Crew

Established Member
Joined
5 Sep 2003
Messages
283
Reaction score
0
Location
Chesterfield, Derbyshire
Hi Eric,

Welcome to the forum.

I think reading the postings, Alf has said it all. Wherever possible consider buying a lathe with a cast bed, I've tested a whole bundle of lathes for a number of companies and always found those with a cast bed seem to give a smoother cut and finish straight from the tool.

You should also consider getting a lesson from a local woodturner if there is one or try the Association of Woodturners site and look at the "Tuition" page for a turner in your area. There's nothing worse that having a lathe, tools and a lump of wood and not being sure where to start.

CC
 

Steve

Established Member
Joined
6 Nov 2002
Messages
166
Reaction score
0
Location
Welling, Kent
Hi Eric,
Just to re-iterate what CC said - once you've got your lathe (and avoid single bars at all cost) go on a beginner's course. You'll learn things in a few hours that might take years if you plod away on your own!
The Record starter's kit is terrific value, within your budget and an ideal introduction (see Stilesandbates.co.uk) I've also heard that the Fox lathe (check Rutlands.co.uk) is a blinder for the money. I'm a Record man meself - and I have never had any trouble at all with the twin bars - but whatever you do, it's got to be a cast bed or twin bars.
 

trevtheturner

Established Member
Joined
26 Feb 2003
Messages
1,144
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire, UK.
Hi, Steve,

On the question of lathe beds, I have a Hegner which, as you probably know, has a box section heavy steel bed. I built my own bench for the lathe, as I am tall, to get the axis between centres at exactly the right height for me. This is constructed from concrete blocks, topped with 1" MDF, with bolts through the lathe ends into the concrete. I have found this works superbly and the lathe is 100% - but it's a bit difficult to think of dragging it around the workshop!

Trev.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I fully agre with the Trev approach. If its 300 for a lathe, then go for it. The other items just become part of your normal consumable purchases and end up not being an issue. There is ofcourse the birthday and xmas list as well. :D
Jaco
 
Top