Sharpening

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Carbide tips can be honed with a diamond stone, normally across the top face but I see no reason why the sides can't be honed too.
makes sense, never bothered before as I always got them for "free" but now being retired from my own company. I will run out at some point so will give that a try as I can not offset them as a retiree any longer ! thanks for the tip.
 
Literally a grind that produces a gouge shaped like a finger with a rounded end & cutting edges on the sides rather than a square end (often call a conventional grind). Lots of names for the same thing eg. swept back, Irish, Ellsworth etc. Mainly for bowl gouges but sometimes for spindle gouges especially if they are made from a round bar.
Thanks Robbo!

And thanks Phil, that's a nice way of putting it!
 
I'm sure I'm going to open a Pandora's box, but I'm new to turning. Just did a course with Yandles and used the Sorby Pro Edge extensively - very enjoyable and I just realised the value of always have a sharp tool.

Right now, I'm not sure I can justify the £450 although I am of the view of buy quality and you won't have to replace it in the future.

I've looked at the Sorby bench grinder jig, but that's about £150 plus the cost of grinding wheels is going to take me to close on £200 so wondered about one of these: Gouge Chisel Sharpening Jig for Wood Lathe Woodturning chisels for Bench Grinder : Amazon.co.uk: Business, Industry & Science. Seems to have very good reviews and just wondered if anyone has used them?

Thanks!
I have had the Robert Sorby lasted with me few weeks, Then sold it. Very good idea but lots of work need to be Dunn before it comes up to match. Im wet grinding at the mo match better than the RS. But a bit slower. If you don't want to muck about get a Tormax T8 & there jigs & leather buffers. you want regret it its the way to go. But also consider diamond or cbn wheels with the tomax.
 
It is really not so difficult to make your own gouge sharpening jig (patterns available online). It doesn't have to involve metalworking! I think a Totmek type wet grinder is better suited to fine woodworking chisels and plane blades than lathe tools where a mirror finish and razor edge is not really needed and a quick tune up is more useful.
 
It is really not so difficult to make your own gouge sharpening jig (patterns available online). It doesn't have to involve metalworking! I think a Totmek type wet grinder is better suited to fine woodworking chisels and plane blades than lathe tools where a mirror finish and razor edge is not really needed and a quick tune up is more useful.
From what I’ve read a few times, wet grinders like the Tormek are too slow for general duty on turning tools.
 
From what I’ve read a few times, wet grinders like the Tormek are too slow for general duty on turning tools.
guarantee
Depends on what stone you have on & what Finnish you want. I have used a 6" dry grind for all my irons much faster but does heat the metal Evan a little bit of heat no matter how meticulous I took it. In my retirement I got a cheep wet stone FB Market Place just to give it a go. Without a doubt the way to go. I know have a new record power wet stone with leather honing wheels & Tormek Jigs. The only improvement I think now to speed thins up is Diamond or CBN wheels. But must say the Tormek T8 with a 50 year guarantee Has got my tastebuds going.
 
I got the impression years ago that even Tormek realised that removing chips or reshaping tools on a wet grinder can be very tedious. That’s why they introduced their guide setup for bench grinders, leaving the Tormek for just the final sharpening. I’m sure it works well, but you do need two machines.

A belt grinder may not be quite as good as a wet grinder for final sharpening but you can do all of it with just one machine. Unmatched is also the ability to run anything from 40 grit to over several thousand grit on the machine.
 
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