A sharpening thread :-)

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steve355

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Hi

The other day for some reason i tried flattening the back of a blade with a piece of 600g sandpaper and when I saw how quickly it worked I realised that my trio of Faithfull diamond sharpening plates is probably knackered after about 4 years of abuse. So I thought I’d ask for suggestions for replacement.

i don’t want water stones as I often hone concave profiled blades with “horns” which would ruin them in no time.
I have a smallish hard Arkansas stone which produces a nice fine edge. But has not held up particularly well as it has a few pits in it already. But I like the results. Of course I also have a strop.

It’s for freehand honing of chisels, plane irons, gouges etc, flattening backs, typical hand tool stuff. I have a grinder and a sorby pro-edge also for shaping. I’d like to be able to get fine edges and shiny backs without too much effort,

But I reckon it’s time for an upgrade. Suggestions welcome.

Thanks
Steve
 
Got to admit @steve355 i was really disappointed how quickly my diamond stones lost their abrading edge & they were all DMT brand, I’ve now been using the scary sharp papers from Peter Sefton for more years than I care to remember & can’t see me changing.
I know folks say they are dearer in the long run but I don’t think they are when I consider how much I spent on diamond stones for how short a time they lasted.
 
Got to admit @steve355 i was really disappointed how quickly my diamond stones lost their abrading edge & they were all DMT brand, I’ve now been using the scary sharp papers from Peter Sefton for more years than I care to remember & can’t see me changing.
I know folks say they are dearer in the long run but I don’t think they are when I consider how much I spent on diamond stones for how short a time they lasted.
To be honest Doug I might be ok with some adhesive sandpaper for fast removal and use my Arkansas stone and strop for the fine stuff.
 
Three grades of Norton India oil stone is all you need for almost everything. They will last for life.
Plus a bit of leather stuck to a board for a strop.
It's weird how sharpening has become so removed from reality. Trad sharpening completely written off. Just commercial pressure, hack writers and dodgy gurus IMHO.
Though a coarse 3M Diapad is good for refreshing a stone. They last for years too.
and 3 in 1 oil thinned with white spirit.
A little and often. Keep it simple!
 
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Three grades of Norton India oil stone is all you need for almost everything.
Can you be more specific as to what grades, I might just get some and give sharpening my chissels a go in the new year because people were sharpening tools long before we had electricity so these sharpening machines everyone wants to sell you now cannot be essential.
 
Can you be more specific as to what grades, I might just get some and give sharpening my chissels a go in the new year because people were sharpening tools long before we had electricity so these sharpening machines everyone wants to sell you now cannot be essential.
You still need to put a bevel on a chisel from time to time. A hand crank grinder will do that much more efficiently than rubbing it on a stone. No electricity needed. I have 2, neither of them work properly but if they do they are very good.
 
I’ve ordered a medium India stone to go along with my hard Arkansas stone. I can use my 600g diamond stone for flattening the oil stones as it’s not in too bad nick.

I’ve also ordered some 120g adhesive sandpaper for fast initial flattening of backs.

I think that’ll give me everything I need without too much outlay.
 
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Can you be more specific as to what grades, I might just get some and give sharpening my chissels a go in the new year because people were sharpening tools long before we had electricity so these sharpening machines everyone wants to sell you now cannot be essential.
coarse, medium, fine.
Double sided Norton ib8 is coarse and medium and does for most things most of the time, from axes to plane blades.
Norton "0" is coarse and finer for a better a finish.
Their system is not very clear but it served everybody well until sharpening went crazy.
 
Got to admit @steve355 i was really disappointed how quickly my diamond stones lost their abrading edge & they were all DMT brand, I’ve now been using the scary sharp papers from Peter Sefton for more years than I care to remember & can’t see me changing.
I know folks say they are dearer in the long run but I don’t think they are when I consider how much I spent on diamond stones for how short a time they lasted.
Do you have any tips on stopping the paper peeling/bubbling up over time? I got the sample pack few months ago and pretty impressed so far.
 
To be honest @Oscar43634 I’ve not had that problem, I do tend to use cellulose thinners to wipe the glass plate prior to applying the self adhesive papers so I know the glass is a clean as I can get it.
The only thing I’ve found is I need to careful when using the finest grit to avoid tearing it but that comes with use.
 
Hi

The other day for some reason i tried flattening the back of a blade with a piece of 600g sandpaper and when I saw how quickly it worked I realised that my trio of Faithfull diamond sharpening plates is probably knackered after about 4 years of abuse. So I thought I’d ask for suggestions for replacement.

i don’t want water stones as I often hone concave profiled blades with “horns” which would ruin them in no time.
I have a smallish hard Arkansas stone which produces a nice fine edge. But has not held up particularly well as it has a few pits in it already. But I like the results. Of course I also have a strop.

It’s for freehand honing of chisels, plane irons, gouges etc, flattening backs, typical hand tool stuff. I have a grinder and a sorby pro-edge also for shaping. I’d like to be able to get fine edges and shiny backs without too much effort,

But I reckon it’s time for an upgrade. Suggestions welcome.

Thanks
Steve
Steve, talk and ask all you want about sharpening and don’t ever apologise for it.
 
To be honest @Oscar43634 I’ve not had that problem, I do tend to use cellulose thinners to wipe the glass plate prior to applying the self adhesive papers so I know the glass is a clean as I can get it.
The only thing I’ve found is I need to careful when using the finest grit to avoid tearing it but that comes with use.
When on finest grades.... Pull don't push!
 
I use abrasive papers from plain rolls and stick them to a piece of float glass using Screwfix No-nonsense spray adhesive - I attach 120 grit one side and 240 on the other and then move on to 320 silicon carbide wet-n-dry which is merely laid on and not glued to the surface of the 240 - the residual grip on the underlying paper is sufficient to stop a full sheet from moving around. Finally I replace the 320 with 1200-1600 silicon carbide paper and I find that is sufficient to get a good mirror finish.
I do have a leather strop too but rarely need to use that, but I guess it depends on the type of work and wood you are using.
Here's a chisel sharpened using this method, takes maybe 5 mins -
20220320_164246.jpg
 
I use abrasive papers from plain rolls and stick them to a piece of float glass using Screwfix No-nonsense spray adhesive - I attach 120 grit one side and 240 on the other and then move on to 320 silicon carbide wet-n-dry which is merely laid on and not glued to the surface of the 240 - the residual grip on the underlying paper is sufficient to stop a full sheet from moving around. Finally I replace the 320 with 1200-1600 silicon carbide paper and I find that is sufficient to get a good mirror finish.
I do have a leather strop too but rarely need to use that, but I guess it depends on the type of work and wood you are using.
Here's a chisel sharpened using this method, takes maybe 5 mins -View attachment 174443
If you use A4 size thin paper-backed wet n dry you don't need to stick it to glass etc you just put it on wet into pool of white spirit and poor more on top. It stays firmly stuck down once it has been flattened with a pass or two and well wetted down
It's designed for the job, cuts better wet, lies flatter and can be lifted off once finished. Best if stored between boards to keep it flat for re-use.
For a long plane sole like a No 8 you just put two sheets end to end.
It's also cheaper than the alternatives and lasts longer if used wet.
https://thesandingroom.co.uk/shop/a...Silicone Carbide,for use within car industry.
 
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As with all techniques - it's what works for you that counts!! - but agree, used wet they cut much faster but I suspect leave a less polished surface at the grit ranges I finish with.
Was really only pointing out that cheap roll based papers glued seem to last for ages and are I suspect cheaper than self-adhesive, so cleaning up the glass prior to replacement whilst a faff is done infrequently so not a huge diversion...
 
A small point that Jacob skipped over is that using wet and dry paper on glass leaves a tiny step for your honing guide to ride over-you might not even notice it's effect.

fisherman-clipart-disciple-fishing-11.png
 
A small point that Jacob skipped over is that using wet and dry paper on glass leaves a tiny step for your honing guide to ride over-you might not even notice it's effect.

fisherman-clipart-disciple-fishing-11.png
Not if you don't run off the edge of the sheet.
 

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