Makita drill/driver

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billw

The Tattooed One
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So my new "now I've got a battery Ill end up buying all 12,000 tools in the range" Makita turned up today. Very nice it is too.

HOWEVER. I am really not sure why there's so many settings. It has torque settings from 1 to 21, (odd stages only), then 3 settings of hammer/driver/drill and then a switch marked 1 and 2, which seems to have an effect on speed.

So now I'm not sure whether I'm drilling things too slowly, or driving them too fast. Or neither. Or maybe both. Oh and there's also reverse, which I assume is for when you want to take a screw out or fill in a hole you drilled wrong.
 
I can't remember the last time I used the clutch/torque setting on a drill/driver, I just leave them in drill mode and rely on the feel through the trigger.
 
Welcome to the new age Bill.
Once you get used to your new toy, you'll use all those settings all the time.
Reverse great for dismantling stuff and screwdriving. If you're going to disassemble some machine or swap all the electrical sockets in your house, drill driving all the faceplate screws in and out saves an age ...
Torque settings to drive all sorts of different size screws nicely flush without overdriving them.
Hammer drill for putting up aerial brackets, hooks for a washing line, etc if you haven't got a cordless SDS

The one to watch out for on a model like that is selecting what you know is a good torque for a small screw but forgetting to select screwdriver mode. Laving it in "drill" where the torque setting is ignored means you then drive the screw halfway through the wood (or plaster) before you realise what's happening.
 
As well as removing screws, reverse is very useful for driving screws to ensure a tighter joint. You'll get used to quickly flicking to reverse then back to forward to drive screws without a gap. Torque settings are very useful for pocket screws and close edge screw driving (after counter sinking) where over-driving could split the wood.
 
The 1 / 2 speed switch is just that. 1 also comes with the added joy of extra torque. I'll use 1 for bigger drill bits (auger, spade, forstner etc.) and bigger screws. 2 is good for twist drills and smaller screws you're not overly worried about setting carefully.

I don't know the exact model you have, but if it's the 781 then do watch when using anything that may bite like a holesaw or auger. It has a lot of torque and will, should it stick, turn either you or the world... whichever weighs less :giggle: For the former it'll try and take your wrist with it. So use the clutch and / or the big handle you've probably cast asunder when doing bigger stuff.

The clutch has been pretty much covered I think above. It's a great thing when driving multiple screws home as, once set, you can fire them in with little thought - other than where knots are involved which will need a touch more persuasion.
 
The one to watch out for on a model like that is selecting what you know is a good torque for a small screw but forgetting to select screwdriver mode. Laving it in "drill" where the torque setting is ignored means you then drive the screw halfway through the wood (or plaster) before you realise what's happening.
whenever possible I try and have 2 drills or a drill and a driver to get around this situation (also to save time changing bits)
 
The model is a DHP484Z. So "drill" is just a one setting thing and the 1-21 is just when it's in driver mode? I found some sort of chart about the type of screw that suits the torque.

I suspect at some point I'll try to put a screw into something and forget to change the setting and have to ask next door for my screw back.

Thanks to @TheUnicorn for reigning in my impulsive spending habit :whistle:
 
As well as removing screws, reverse is very useful for driving screws to ensure a tighter joint. You'll get used to quickly flicking to reverse then back to forward to drive screws without a gap. Torque settings are very useful for pocket screws and close edge screw driving (after counter sinking) where over-driving could split the wood.

You do realise that this is going to create about 20 threads where I ask about the correct torque for driving a 25mm screw into maple, after checking what countersink I need and how many milliseconds I need to engage reverse for to ensure a correct fit?
 
You do realise that this is going to create about 20 threads where I ask about the correct torque for driving a 25mm screw into maple, after checking what countersink I need and how many milliseconds I need to engage reverse for to ensure a correct fit?
confused by the screwing backwards business, I've done it, but always assumed it just meant I didn't have my torque set high enough. Didn't realise it was a technique
 
It's worth noting that while you can (and do) back a screw out with reverse, adjust the clutch setting and repeat until the screw is seated correctly... the next screw your drive won't necessarily seat the same. The reason being you've driven the screw in, taken it out, driven it back in and out and shaken it all about. Unless you repeat the exact same steps and settings, the next screw won't seat exactly the same.

When it counts, use a scrap piece with a few pilot holes and drive a screw in to each hole *only once* until your clutch setting seats the screw as desired. Only then is your driver set to put an identical screw into an identical pilot hole to the same depth. This is all a bit OTT for a lot of times - and you'll get a feel for the drills trigger which can avoid such faffery.
 
The best way to set screw depth when fixing timber to timber is by simply releasing the trigger when the screw is at the correct depth.

As Nelsun said you get a feel for the drills trigger, some drills are better at this than others, Festool drills excel at this.

The main time to use the clutch is when fastening a harder material to a softer material for example a hinge to a door.
 
When people say "clutch" I presume they mean the effect of the amount of pressure on the trigger? It's very smooth that's for sure.

On positive note I managed to drill a hole with it.
 
It's worth getting to grips with these settings. I used to be one of those "leave it on max/drill" and get a feel for it but no more.

For example, using a pocket hole jig is really hard in the likes of MDF/sheet goods unless you use your cluck/speed settings. Drill, then switch down to something middle of the range so you don't damage the piece or screw too far.

The other times it comes in handy as mentioned above is for assembly and general DIY - flatpack that sort of thing, a lower speed is ideal.

It will take a bit of practice but changing the torque/speed becomes second nature. I plan on getting a second combi drill for some bigger builds just so it's less of a faff. My only gripe with these settings is why the manufacturers don't stick to 1 - 10, my dewalt goes up to 13 or something, be nice if this was consistent across tools.
 
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