Looking to get a Winch

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Bristol_Rob

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Guys

I'm considering buying a second hand (or affordable new) winch to help with my shed build and moving of machines thereafter.

Does anyone have any recommendations of brands you'd recommend
Brands to avoid

I'm looking for a single phase 240v electric winch with a capacity of 1,000lbs min.

I think my budget is circa up to £200

I know nothing about them, never used one before :rolleyes:

TIA
 
When you say winch do you mean like a steel wire winch for horizontal use or a hoist for lifting stuff off the ground?

The first one you can't go wrong with a tifors these are hand operated and there's usually loads on facey marketplace for not much ££.

Adidat
 
I don’t know that much either so I’d be looking at what machine mart has to offer and a company called vevor. I’ve purchased a …(edit )core drill and a manualwinch to help me on tree jobs and both of these are solid bits of kit for under £100 each ..
 
I wonder if.... I think some caravanists might use winches to drag their 'vans about at home, and boatists use them to pull their boats onto trailers. Might be worth a look at a couple of supplier websites. Maybe hand cranked, maybe 12v, maybe 240v although that seems unlikely for boat trailers.

Another thought, do you have a plan for where you will fix it? You probably want the heavy machine to move rather than the shed.
 
From a safety point of view, a steel wire stores energy so if it breaks this energy is suddenly released and can result in immense damage, something experienced during vehicle recovery using a hydraulic winch on a landrover but no injury just a few people nearby with soiled underpants. So if going the route of a winch look at Dyneema, lighter than steel and no issues with stored energy. I would also agree with the Tirfor, a good device if you have the stamina and something to attach it to because the item with least resistance will move first !
 
I've used them both ways. Not ideal horizontally but still useful, but a rope block and tackle easier to handle.
Sure about that. One of the butchers I worked in we had a chain operated winch hung from a girder on the ceiling. We used that to suspend sides from (3 of total weight about 600lbs) when cleaning out the chill.
I think theyre called 'chain hoists'

Interesting note- On some shops like butchers, which were built a century or so ago, theres always a pillar in the back shop and the surface of it is all knobbles. This was what you wrapped the chain around. The knobbly bits caught hold of the chain so you just needed to wrap it around the pillar a couple of times
 
You probably want the heavy machine to move rather than the shed.

and something to attach it to because the item with least resistance will move first !
I know to well from this experience, I have several winches/block & tackle options, anyway, needed to pull some buddleia out of my garden, got the tirfor out wrapped a loop around a tree and the bud, cracked on, using a scaffold pole on the handle for a bit more leverage, bud was a bit hesitant to shift, you know the rest!
 
I've used them both ways. Not ideal horizontally but still useful, but a rope block and tackle easier to handle.
Chain blocks are meant to be used for lifting ,not pulling in this way. I’ve seen people snap the chains when overloading them in this way. Might get away with it depends on the load, when the chains need Garth on them to pull then they are in overload.
Regards,
Dave
 
I had a small chain hoist (now gone with downsizing) which was mostly used in horizontal mode. To make operation easier I replaced the continuous chain with a cranked handle which clamped onto the chain wheel. I used it a few months ago to pull down my garage walls. I also pulled out quite a few tree stumps with it. Not an ideal arrangement ergonomically but you can apply a lot of force over a long distance at an economic price
Brian
 
To make operation easier I replaced the continuous chain with a cranked handle

Don't rush out to patent your idea as I do believe someone has been there before you. They are called lever hoists. The Americans cal them 'come alongs'.

Chain blocks are meant to be used for lifting, not pulling in this way.

Sort of. It is purely a logistics problem with chain management trying to use it in a horizontal mode.

Yale make a chain hoist that can be used at any angle (Yale MINI360 Manual Chain Hoist)

The internal construction of a 1t lever hoist and a 1t chain block are 95% identical. The most significant difference is that a lever hoist has a neutral position so the handle is free rotating.
 
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