Front sliding mitre saws. Help?

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alex robinson

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I know this topic comes up a lot. They seem a brilliant option for smaller workshops, but the choice is limited. It would appear 2 distinct price points (though I don't quite understand how the DeWalt 774 fits in with regards to features).

My looking up suggests at the cheaper end:
Hyundai hyms 2000e (£200), Hikoki C8FSHG (£175), DeWalt 773 (£230), 774 (£320).

For the more expensive options:
Makita LS1019 (£540), Metabo KGSV 72 (£550), Triton TCMS254 (£490), Kapex HS60 (£750) and the Bosch Glide (£900). I put the last 2 in as while they are a lot more expensive, they are the only ones that seem to turn up second hand.

Firstly, does anyone have experience of either the Hyundai or the Hikoki? I can find people mentioning them as options when this question has come round before, but never anyone who has owned one.

The cheaper set are all single bevel, without trenching. The more expensive all double bevel.

I don't really mind about a 216 or 255mm blade, but wondered if people thought the extra cost was worth it. Ideally my budget was around £350, so right in the middle!

Currently I own a rather tatty evolution saw. The capacity and double bevel is nice, but it is far from accurate and takes up way more space than I can afford. I hope that any of these options (even the cheaper end) will feel like an upgrade!

Thanks!
 
Depends what you will be using it for, the cheaper end is ok for fences and sheds but if you want more precise cuts and angles then a decent mitre saw is essential. The larger saws allow you to cut larger section timber and also wider due to more travel. I understand your need for front slides as my current bosch has rear slides and takes a lot of room behind, that will be replaced by the bosch axial glide at some point.
 
Depends what you will be using it for, the cheaper end is ok for fences and sheds but if you want more precise cuts and angles then a decent mitre saw is essential. The larger saws allow you to cut larger section timber and also wider due to more travel. I understand your need for front slides as my current bosch has rear slides and takes a lot of room behind, that will be replaced by the bosch axial glide at some point.
The larger saw would be nice, but there always have to be compromises. The front sliding aspect is essential, and that seems to pretty much rule out my usual option of buying second hand.
 
Kapex KS60 (£750)
I'd look around. I paid £589 in January for mine. Can't see it having gone up £161 in 12 months.

But get the Kapex anyway. You'll love it completely and find it easy to use. The extraction beats everyone else. Trenching for dados are easy to set up, and the clamp is really simple, its the same one you use on the rail system, so you've effectively got right and left side clamping ability.
If you are horsing through 3" timbers daily, then a 12", but if its just really furniture and high end diy then a 10" is fine.

The other thing about the Festool is it holds its price well. So after a number of years, if you look after the machine, give it a wipe down occasionally and decide to pack it all in, its going to give you a better return that any of the others. The cheaper ones you might as well give away for all the interest there is in 2nd hand ones.

I really dont like the look of the metabo or the triton. the metabo looks especially pants with its 2 dozen levers and things.
 
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I'd look around. I paid £589 in January for mine. Can't see it having gone up £161 in 12 months.

But get the Kapex anyway. You'll love it completely and find it easy to use. The extraction beats everyone else. Trenching for dados are easy to set up, and the clamp is really simple, its the same one you use on the rail system, so you've effectively got right and left side clamping ability.
If you are horsing through 3" timbers daily, then a 12", but if its just really furniture and high end diy then a 10" is fine.

The other thing about the Festool is it holds its price well. So after a number of years, if you look after the machine, give it a wipe down occasionally and decide to pack it all in, its going to give you a better return that any of the others. The cheaper ones you might as well give away for all the interest there is in 2nd hand ones.
I had been trying to avoid persuading myself I needed something fancy! I take it you are a fan then? Never used anything Festool, but I know how amazing it felt to upgrade from a cheap lathe to a decent one. I guess it must be the same - maybe I need to get saving...

Do you mind if I ask where you got it from?
 
I got mine from Kelvin power tools in Glasgow, but now I think on it there might have been a discount.

i dont want to push you towards something thats just too expensive for you. I could afford it at the time and this was my trade for a while so prefer higher end kit for the most part
 
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