Co2 in the home

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artie

Sawdust manufacturer.
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We've had a few very informative threads regarding humidity, condensation etc but I don't recall any about Co2.

I bought this old house about 5 years ago, installed double glazing etc,etc no more draughty sash windows, new PVC back door no more draughty doors.

But considering it was built in 1935 I figured there would be more than enough leaks to keep it ventilated.

After reading an article about co2 in the home and how it was usually higher than most people realise, I bought a meter.

Readings in rooms that have been unoccupied for a while are just slightly higher than outside. But with one person + cat in the living room the level soon rises above 1000ppm. With 2 people + cat the level approaches 2000ppm

The bedroom with 2 occupants no cat can reach 2224 overnight. They say these levels are in the danger area.

I don't mean danger of instant death but possible long term ill effects.

This is quite easily remedied with an open window, the levels drop quite quickly to 7-800 and I'm surprised how little difference it makes to temperature BUT there is a dramatic increase in RH. 71% in the bedroom this morning and 80% in the bathroom.

I fear if this continued the dreaded mold will soon appear.

So what's one to do?
 
Get a pot plant.

Dehumdifiers are also v useful as you make the house more airtight
IIRC, plants only take in CO2 while they're photosynthesising, so not much use in the evenings or night times.
 
No, but they let out oxygen during that time
They let out oxygen as a by-product of photosynthesis, also a small amount of CO2. During the night, they give out more CO2 and no oxygen - at least, that's how I understood it at school...
 
They let out oxygen as a by-product of photosynthesis, also a small amount of CO2. During the night, they give out more CO2 and no oxygen - at least, that's how I understood it at school...
Correct but a lot of house plants such as spider plants and snake plants are very good at absorbing toxins from the air over night, since I turned my place into an I door jungle I sleep amazingly well and never get ill 😁
 
Looking at your figures the cat is obviously absorbing co2, simple answer is get more cats, and some pot plants for them to knock over ;)
A possibility, however, I attributed the lower levels in the living room to the chimney.
I should have mentioned that.
 
You die of asphyxiation at 10% CO2 content. For this reason CO2 fire extinguisher systems were replaced with water based systems.
Brian
Every day's a school day! My understanding which was wrong was that only a lack of oxygen would cause asphyxiation, for a healthy person the limit of survive ability is below 6% O2. I know that hyperventilating in normal atmosphere drops the blood CO2 and causes the ph level to fall which can make you faint.

Did a bit of digging found this

The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) recommends an 8- hour TWA Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 5,000 ppm and a Ceiling exposure limit (not to be exceeded) of 30,000 ppm for a 10-minute period. A value of 40,000 is considered immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH value).

So 4% could kill you even with plenty of Oxygen, still a long way above 2224 ppm - not going to worry to much although I do have 3 cats
 
You die of asphyxiation at 10% CO2 content. For this reason CO2 fire extinguisher systems were replaced with water based systems.
Brian
10% would be 100000 ppm if my math is correct, so still a long way from that.

I suppose the solution would be ducts and heat recovery, but this could have an effect on the fire draught.
 
A chimney will always cause a draught.
Yes. and with a little experimentation this afternoon I've discovered, I can raise or lower the co2 in the room by adjusting the stove damper.
Don't know how this would work out if the stove was lit.
 
Have you looked at Positive Input Ventilation? It was little short of miraculous in fixing our condensation and mould problems, and apparently helps with Radon as well, so I would expect it to help the CO2 level.
Yes I was reading up a bit about it.
Since you actually have it and can give first hand experience, does it significantly lower the temperature around the input area?

If you wouldn't mind, would you elaborate a little on your situation?
 
Yes I was reading up a bit about it.
Since you actually have it and can give first hand experience, does it significantly lower the temperature around the input area?

If you wouldn't mind, would you elaborate a little on your situation?
It does make it a bit colder on the upstairs landing, but for us, that's a small price to pay for no mould or condensation. Our house was originally a 300 year old barn, and so insulation is a bit hit and miss.
 
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