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carving tools what you think?

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Dodge

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in a word - Rubbish!

I was given a set of the Machine Mart version of the same as a gift by a relative - The steel is attrocious, they are as thick as a girder and lay in the bottom of my bench.

Save your money and buy some decent ones - You dont have to spend stupid money and you can get some excellent carving tools as cheap as chips at the car boot sales.

My opinion anyway

Rog
 

Melinda_dd

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Any recommendations? I've seen a few sets for around £40-£50 but not sure if that's good or not
One of the sets is by record power
 

condeesteso

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I fairly agree - I never manage to get to boot fairs, but ebay is next best. There are plenty of good ones at bargain prices. Look for names like Henry Taylor, Sorby and many others. But you will likely need to know how to sharpen them! Just checked ebay, there are loads, as usual. e.g.:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Twenty-Victor ... 803wt_1337

If you want new you will need to spend quite a bit. I have some Pfiell and they are very good but quite pricey, the rest of mine are vintage and wonderful!!
 

Melinda_dd

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is there different angles for different tools or are they at the same angle?
I do have a grinder to do my turning tools on so I'm hoping I'll be alright
Any advice would be helpful
 

condeesteso

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I'm no great expert on carving tools, but according to Henry Taylor (and others) an internal bevel is often beneficial. Generally what you do for the turning tools will be good for carving tools too, but you will need some slipstones or similar to hone internal edges. I tend to use fine wet'n'dry + spit, wrapped round any item to hand (screwdriver, drill bit, gimlet... anything).
Also I have found polishing is important - some leather bonded to a block of flat stock, plus Autosol metal polish. The back-bevel burnishes the cut as it makes it, but also the polishing process makes a super-keen edge but take care not to round the bevel (pay close attention to angles when polishing). But you are used to sharpening turning tools so you are close to there already. I urge you to look at the nice older ones on ebay!
 

jimi43

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Addis is the name to look out for on the carving chisel front...he was a Ward and Payne employee back in time long gone...you can find them at bootfairs if you are lucky....

The steel is just out of this world...expect to pay about a fiver each on FleaBay...but worth every penny.

Jim
 

yetloh

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+1 for Addis, Jim. I've got a stack of them bought over a few years. Don't use them much but when I do need them they are ace.

Jim
 

Jacob

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Cheapo are OK (you get what you pay for) but may need a lot of shaping and honing - but as a beginner you need the practice so that's good.
 

Harbo

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Yes J B Addis - fantastic steel - I inherited a set:



They each have a No. and "Prize Medal" or something stamped on them?


Rod
 

bugbear

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Jacob":390mn4zi said:
Cheapo are OK (you get what you pay for) but may need a lot of shaping and honing - but as a beginner you need the practice so that's good.

Jacob":390mn4zi said:
I'm beginning to think that the UK tradition of supplying unfinished tools is quite insane. Why do they do it?
BugBear
 

jimi43

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Jacob":3m7nsixr said:
Cheapo are OK (you get what you pay for) but may need a lot of shaping and honing - but as a beginner you need the practice so that's good.
The issue is not with the lack of finish...although this is bad enough....it is the steel.

Cheap steel...probably recycled washing machines mixed with mouldy Cheddar...can never be shaped and honed to produce a useful tool...ever...even by you using bits of rock mixed with diesel....

Tools made of cheap "cutting" steel are not "OK"....they are one of the main reasons potential craftsmen and women are put off the art forever and encouraging new members by saying that they are useable is downright irresponsible.

If someone setting out in this fine subject are going to spend time learning to care for and modify tools, they are better served practicing this on old Sheffield steel where the result will be fulfilling rather than being put off for life by trying to fettle supermarket rubbish.


Jim
 

Jacob

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jimi43":h2tulj1i said:
Jacob":h2tulj1i said:
Cheapo are OK (you get what you pay for) but may need a lot of shaping and honing - but as a beginner you need the practice so that's good.
The issue is not with the lack of finish...although this is bad enough....it is the steel.

Cheap steel...probably recycled washing machines mixed with mouldy Cheddar...can never be shaped and honed to produce a useful tool...ever...even by you using bits of rock mixed with diesel....

Tools made of cheap "cutting" steel are not "OK"....they are one of the main reasons potential craftsmen and women are put off the art forever and encouraging new members by saying that they are useable is downright irresponsible.

If someone setting out in this fine subject are going to spend time learning to care for and modify tools, they are better served practicing this on old Sheffield steel where the result will be fulfilling rather than being put off for life by trying to fettle supermarket rubbish.


Jim
I got a Faithful set (probably the same as the Lidl offering). The steel was OK but they weren't very well shaped to say the least. But not so bad that anybody should be discouraged from attempting to use them. Have a go with anything IMHO!
Really "good" tools can be just as discouraging as they don't turn anybody into a craftsman overnight.
 

jimi43

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Jacob":3r7s000l said:
jimi43":3r7s000l said:
I rest my case......
Do you do much carving yourself?
I haven't made a Koi or that beautiful girl and boy in the library but I have whittled the odd woggle or two... :mrgreen:

Enough to know between a good and a bad tool and ALL the Faithful tools I have encountered are dross.

I will get one though...and prove this to you...seeing as you are hell bent on destroying another perfectly good thread. :roll:

Jim
 

Jacob

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They aren't very good this is true. But "carving" can mean anything from chainsaw and axe down to fine engraving tools. If anybody wants to attack a piece of wood with some Lidl cheapies I think they should be encouraged. Good sharpening practice too.
I realise that this point of view does not coincide with the very strict orthodoxy of the toolies (only the best and most expensive will do etc) but it is perfectly valid. Maybe there should be a separate closed forum for tool fetishists.
Very many people would never have even begun to do their thing were it not for the availability of cheap kit. I had a Black & Decker drill plus stupid attachments for quite a long time.
If you see this as "destroying another perfectly good thread" that's your problem. I'm all for it!
 

yetloh

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Jacob":2y5yv0qk said:
Really "good" tools can be just as discouraging as they don't turn anybody into a craftsman overnight.
I have yet to meet someone new to woodworking (and I have met many) who thought that expensive tools would magically turn them into skilled crafts people. but I have seen people put off by rubbish tools - not least myself in my younger years when presented with a brand new Stanley No 4 which despite my best efforts I could not persuade to works. I, quite naturally in my view, thought the fault was with me.

The point surely is that highly skilled people can get excellent results from mediocre tools but those who are acquiring skills find it much easier to get good results with really good tools. I have seen this enough times to know that it is true, so I don't buy the argument that really good tools can put people off. Yes, mediocre tools can be fettled and modified by the amateur to work well, but the beginner is unlikely to have the knowledge, skills and inclination to attempt this. I remain convinced that the best advice to those on a restricted budget is to buy few tools but buy high quality. This does not necessarily mean hideously expensive, because good quality is out there at reasonable prices e.g. Quangsheng planes.

Jim
 
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