Which Table Saw?

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BigDean

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Morning all,

For months now I have been looking at which table saw to buy for my single garage workshop. I am new to the craft, so cant give a definitive answer to "what will you be using it for"....

I guess it is to make accurate cuts on mdf/ply and small hardwood projects. I have a track saw system set up to rip 8x4 sheets down to manageable sizes, so have no illusions of using the table saw for that.

What I really don't want is an inaccurate / fiddly saw. Budget is not the most important criteria.

I think my list is whittled down to:

Dewalt 7485
This is on the list as the budget option to "get me going". I know I will outgrow, but should I start at this level and work up?

Axminster AW254
Seems like most people think this is a good entry level cast iron unit. Some complain about the fence etc, but seems to be a hit and miss. Can be built into my own workbench in the future. Accessories mean I can add the sliding table if I ever need it, and modify the left side extension to work on the right side for larger capacity.

Lumberjack TS1800
Probably too big for my space, but seems to get reasonable reviews for a fair price (before recent price increases). Good capacity. Cast iron.

Festool CSC SYS 50
Seems like the most accurate small saw you can get, but is the capacity going to be annoying.

I honestly don't think I have found "the one" that makes me place an order immediately.

Any others people could recommend? Comments on the above welcome.

Thanks
BigDean.
 
The Ax AW254 is a decent saw but if you’re going to build it into a bench you lose any advantage of its small size/portability. I had a similar small saw and then bought a SIP 01332 which I really do like, so maybe something like this could be considered.
 
For exactly that reason, I’d suggest one of the smaller Startrite saws.

Unless a site saw is going to be used as intended, ie taken from site to site, the chances are it will be mounted on a stand or built into a bench, loosing any advantage of size.

A small cabinet saw can be made mobile, to move around a small workshop, if needs be.
 
For exactly that reason, I’d suggest one of the smaller Startrite saws.

Unless a site saw is going to be used as intended, ie taken from site to site, the chances are it will be mounted on a stand or built into a bench, loosing any advantage of size.

A small cabinet saw can be made mobile, to move around a small workshop, if needs be.
One on the bay at £250 ATM...
 
One on the bay at £250 ATM...
I have just searched on eBay and they all look like full size bench saws. Also nothing at £250.

I only have a single garage so a full size would be a compromise on other equipment.

With regards to building it into a bench, the idea is that I can also build in a router table like Paoson did. This is WAY beyond my skill set right now but you have to aim high, right?
 
Why would you want a saw you build into a bench? Surely, the most stable, best solution would be to buy a free standing saw and build your bench as the out-feed table. Architect model makers I understand are recommended to use a Startrite 275, I have sold a few to this profession.
Table saws are primarily used to dimension stuff, not to finish it, that’s what you do with either hand planes or a planner thicknesser. That said, is remarkable how accurate and the finish you can get of a stiff, vibration free properly setup saw. I would always recommend you look for an ‘old’ iron machine like a Wadkin, Sedgwick or Startrite.
 
Why would you want a saw you build into a bench? Surely, the most stable, best solution would be to buy a free standing saw and build your bench as the out-feed table. Architect model makers I understand are recommended to use a Startrite 275, I have sold a few to this profession.
Table saws are primarily used to dimension stuff, not to finish it, that’s what you do with either hand planes or a planner thicknesser. That said, is remarkable how accurate and the finish you can get of a stiff, vibration free properly setup saw. I would always recommend you look for an ‘old’ iron machine like a Wadkin, Sedgwick or Startrite.
Thanks for the input. The reason to build a bench is that it can be multi - function. It can have storage, a router table, workspace as well as the saw.

If I put a full size table saw in my single garage it will be the centre piece and everything else will have to work around it.
 
The Axminster saw has a table size of 485x680mm compared to the SIP 01332 at 500x800mm. The SIP is just 15mm wider and 120mm longer front to back. You will have to raise the Axminster to the same height to be able to operate anyhow.
Anything thing you plan to add to the Axi can equally be added onto a proper bench saw. The advantage is that, with a bench saw, the additions can be hinged and drop down to save space, rather than creating a large bench to surround the smaller ‘site’ saw.
The only justification for not buying a bench saw is portability, as the footprint is similar but a proper bench saw is much more stable. Certainly an older Startrite or Wadkin is probably better than a modern equivalent, providing it is in good order. Some of these may be even more compact than my SIP.
I’ve actually kept my smaller saw as I can chuck it in the back of the car for jobs at my two daughter’s houses.
 
I would not recommend building anything into your bench. As said earlier use your bench as teh outfeed table of a free standing saw. My first router taple was a board which I clamped onto the front of the bench. When not in use unclamp and store under the bench. Small startright saws are excellent
 
The Axminster saw has a table size of 485x680mm compared to the SIP 01332 at 500x800mm. The SIP is just 15mm wider and 120mm longer front to back. You will have to raise the Axminster to the same height to be able to operate anyhow.
Anything thing you plan to add to the Axi can equally be added onto a proper bench saw. The advantage is that, with a bench saw, the additions can be hinged and drop down to save space, rather than creating a large bench to surround the smaller ‘site’ saw.
The only justification for not buying a bench saw is portability, as the footprint is similar but a proper bench saw is much more stable. Certainly an older Startrite or Wadkin is probably better than a modern equivalent, providing it is in good order. Some of these may be even more compact than my SIP.
I’ve actually kept my smaller saw as I can chuck it in the back of the car for jobs at my two daughter’s houses.
Please excuse my lack of knowledge but is the iTech 01332 the same as the SIP?

Thanks.
 
Do you need the saw available (and taking space) all the time?

Your choice of the systainer-based Festool indicates not.

So maybe look at saws that come with a folding base/trolly that you can fold away in a corner when not required thus saving space.

To the list, I would suggest you consider also one of the Bosch saws and an appropriate base - perhaps the GTS 10 XC Professional and GTA6000 - or the smaller version also available?
 
I’ve restored a ‘few’ machines and have done a few of the modern none commercial grade machines. All I will say is that I won’t touch the modern stuff as it causes too many problems. I couldn’t get them setup and stay setup for long, they just kept giving the new owners and consequently me headaches. Give me either old iron, a Sedgwick, SCM any day of the week.
 
Thanks for the input guys but I am only looking for new. I have next to zero engineering skills, so the thought of buying an older machine is not for me at this stage.

I appreciate that is the way to go for some people, but just not for me right now.

Thanks.
 
I take from what Deema said, that you could well require more engineering skill with a new saw than an old one! Many threads on here are testimony of that.

The Startrite I linked to is actually from a dealer.

I’ve had various saws from Wadkin, Startrite and Sedgwick, over the years. I’ve sold them here and there, rather than store them or move house with them.

All have been 240, apart from my current Sedgwick.
All have been plug and play, but for one universal joint required on a TA 275 DS.
All have sold for more than i paid for them.
 
Last edited:
Thanks for the input guys but I am only looking for new. I have next to zero engineering skills, so the thought of buying an older machine is not for me at this stage.

I appreciate that is the way to go for some people, but just not for me right now.

Thanks.
Have a look at Holzmann then recommended my Mike.... !🤣
 

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