• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Spindle Moulder vs Router

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi,

Does anyone have any ideas on what the difference is between a "Spindle Moulder" & a router set in a router table?

From what I can see it seems like a router does pretty much everything, Norm seems to use his router table all the time on the new yankee workshop.

I have come to the conclusion a spindle moulder just does larger mouldings, like for door frames etc.. is this correct or havent I got a clue?? :oops:

Norm Fan :p
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
yea - you pretty much got the picture there. both can do a similiar job

I much prefer to use an inverted variable speed router for smaller work - cause I dont like getting my hands anywhere near a moving spindle cutter block, I dont really care much for them when there sitting still. you see all wood machines you need to have a healthy respect for and in my opinion the spindle needs a whole chunk more.

there are plenty of holes in workshop walls that tell the stories of an awol spindle cutter slipped free from its housing at 100, 000 rpm (or what ever it is they spin). and it takes well made brick to stop em.

And as my favourite teacher (my father) taught me...

.............what cuts wood cuts fingers.......

....nevermind bricks and mortar .. he never mentioned them
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
The US term for a spindle moulder is a shaper and Norm does use this occasionally.

You cannot groove panels with a spindle moulder (you cannot run the wood over the top of a spindle moulder cutter, it cuts "side on".

I have both machines and tend to use the SM for the larger pieces of wood since it is physically easier to handle. If starting again, I would buy a powerful router and make/buy a substantial table with a good fence system. :)
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I don’t recall Norm ever using a real shaper on his show, he has used the delta benchtop “shaper” which is really a bad version of a router table (I used to have one of theses things).

As for the differences, I have a “shaper versus router table” article on my web site if you want more detail. To me the issue boils down to what type of cutter you want to spin, not what spins it.

PMB
http://benchmark.20m.com
 

sawdustalley

Established Member
Joined
7 Sep 2002
Messages
601
Reaction score
0
Location
Guildford,Surrey,UK
I remember norm using a floor standing proper Shaper. Was another delta beast.

Unless you are in an industrial workshop, I don't really see the need for a spindle moulder (Or shaper).

If you have a nice big router (some routers you can buy do have the same amount of power as a small spindle moulder) I think you can do most of the stuff you can do with a spindle moulder. Things like Panel Raising, Cutting joints, Housings etc... With no problems.

You need to buy some good quality heavy duty 1/2" router cutters aswell.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Just to clear thing up a spindle moulder is NOT a shaper. They are two different machines. Shapers tend to be smaller than spindles, and take a block which is shaped to the profile being cut, (like a BIG router bit with a hole in the middle) with knives brazed permenantly onto them. Spindles take blocks that are a cylindrical, into which a set of cutters (and now limiters) is set, using a wedge or grub screw system.

Both routers and spindles have their uses, but for most things a spindle is far superior. The only thing it cant do is set grooves into the face of a wide board.

As for spindles being unsafe, set up properly thay are much safer than most router tables on the market.

Cheers
Doughnut
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
If you can afford a spindle moulder I would recomend getting one. You will find you will use it for most jobs over the router/table setup.

It is like getting a small nippy car and a big powerful car, both can do the same thing but with different performances.

I tend to use the big one (spindle moulder) unless it is too big rather than use the small one (router) unless it is too small, if you know what I mean. So I use the spindle moulder all the time, I buy cutters for that rather than for the router
 

Scrit

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2002
Messages
3,872
Reaction score
2
I think the answer boils down to what you are doing. In an industrial shop spindles make a lot of sense - do you know any router that can cut a 40 x 40mm rebate in solid oak in a single pass? Our spindle can. The smooth finish you get from a router inverted in a table is sometimes very useful, but so is the ability of a spindle moulder to cut tenon joints (with either a sliding table or a simple square jig) and do wide fielding (70mm plus, anyone?). A spindle can handle most of the small a router can do, too. I'd agree with the comment that, properly set up, spindles are safer and easier to use than routers. Oh, and one plus point - we can grind our own profile cutters for our spindle (having a profile grinder), something that I'd never be able to do for a router.

Broen

If you are getting your hands near to a spinning cutter block on a spindle then you're obviously not using either Shaw guards or push sticks! As for dislodged cutters, they are really a throwback to the days of square blocks and open-ended slot cutters, both outlawed in the UK (at least) sometime in the 1970s. Modern so-called "safety blocks" simply cannot loose a cutter in that way, even if you loosen the locking screws.
 
Top