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Router with best dust extraction

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JobandKnock

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or why Dewalt never used it on the 1/2 inch 2000 W 625 .
It's maybe because the DW625 started life as the Elu MOF177, the replacement for the Elu MOF98, around 1982/83 - at a time before dust extraction on power tools became a thing (even given that Elu were sort of pioneers in the field). I believe that the Elu OF97 (or the OF1 as it was originally named in Germany) was designed as the replacement for the Elu MOF96 8mm plunge router a couple of years later and may well have taken some of its' inspiration from the Jim Phillip's book "Techniques of Routing", which appeared in 1980 and includes an illustration of "the router of the future" which illustrates in a sketch a plunging (common on European and Japanesel routers at the time - still relatively uncommon on American ones then), variable speed (very rare in 1980 - the only router I can think of was the Elu MOF77) router with a micro adjustable side fence and dust extraction via one of the columns. I don't think it is coincidence that Jim Phillip's founded Trend Machinery in 1955 as the importer of Elu power tools and were still importing Elu in the early 1980s (until Black & Decker took ownership of Elu in the mid 1980s). The OF1 as stated became the OF97, which in turn went yellow as the deWalt DW621, which in turn spawned the DW622. Ever the copyists (at the time) Makita did their own version(s), the RP1100/RP1110.

So that's probably why the DW625 doesn't have built-in dust extraction..


...or maybe not

What is certain is that Trend were a major influence on Elu: they introduced their own micro adjustable side fences forvthe MOF31, MOF77 and MOF98 when Elu.didn't make such things and they produced the first dust extraction kit for the MOF177/DW624/DW625 which seems to have been copied by DW later on (early MOF177s had no DX kit - I have a type 2 owned since new which confirms this)
 
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JobandKnock

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Yeah I also found there was a 1/2" version marketed as the 622k in Europe (621 in US weirdly) but it doesn't seem to be available any more. In fact I can't see any 1/2" routers available new with that design
The 622 is/was 1400 watts and 1/2in collet (same as the unsuccesful DW626 and the USA model DW618), the DW621 is 1200 watts and in Europe was an 8mm tool utilising the same collets as the MOF96, whilst in the USA the DW621 is a 1/2in collet tool using the collet and nut from the DW626, etc. This must make it confusing for people in places like South America where DW621s can be shipped either from Mexico ("US" production) or Slovenia ("German" production). The router is also made in China, but I have no.idea what collet is in that one. European production has been in Germany, Switzerland, Italy and finally Slovenia (at Perles). The 621 and 622 are variable speed - there is/was a single speed 1050(?) watt model, the DW620 as well.
 
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JobandKnock

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Been using routers in my day job for more than 40 years having bought my first one, a Stanley, in the 1970s (my second was a pale blue Elu MOF96). That, and I collect and (occasionally) restore them. Well, you've got to have a hobby!
 

msparker

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Thanks for all the comments! Some serious router knowledge out there.

From the comments, I think I'm going to get a 1/2" router, one of (roughly in order):
- Festool OF1400 (if I can come to terms with the cost)
- Dewalt DW622k (if I can find one on ebay or something - if anybody has one for sale let me know)
- Bosch GMF1600 / Dewalt DW625

for all of the above, would happily go with a good condition used one if anybody has one they want rid of
 

JobandKnock

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Re-removing waste, it seems like spiral upcut bits get the nod here and potentially help funnel the waste towards the extractor
It depends on your point of view! Spiral upcuts exert a lot of pull out on the collet, so your collet needs to be clean, not worn and properly tightened and the cutter must be sharp to avoid it pulling out. When the cutter gets worn it is far more prone to puling itself out of the collet.

In conventional terms there are specific mortise cutters such as this Trend 16mm diameter offset tip design:

tr36x1_2tc_3d1.jpg

which clear waste well, but cost less. The Trend CraftPro version of this (C194) sells for about £26 (street price)

For shallow mortises CMT do these jobbies in a range of diameters both with and without a top bearing which are pretty good, too:

cm80112811.jpg
 
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JobandKnock

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I think you are right sbout the compression not pulling out, but I thought that they'd push the waste into the middle of the cut - not a problem when edge routing double laminate or veneer faced stock on a CNC (the task I believe they were created for) but maybe not so good if deep mortising.

I used to use Wealden's deep pocket cutters when I used Trend's lock mortise jig. They do need to be lifted out from time to time to clear the waste
 

msparker

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Closing the loop here.. I took the plunge (pun intended) and bought the festool OF1400.

So far I have no regrets. The dust extraction really is excellent, they claim 99% and I believe them, and the ease of removing and replacing the shroud is very welcome... It makes it easy to set up your cut with maximum visibility then reattach extraction with no hassle. In comparison I saw a video which showed the Bosch shroud being fixed with a couple of fiddly machine screws which looked like an inferior system.

I image handle config is something you just get used to, but I am very much enjoying the config on the OF1400 which makes it very easy to use with one hand on the handles and another on the fence or base keeping it properly in the cut.

Thanks for all the advise on the thread!
 

Doug71

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Closing the loop here.. I took the plunge (pun intended) and bought the festool OF1400.

So far I have no regrets. The dust extraction really is excellent, they claim 99% and I believe them, and the ease of removing and replacing the shroud is very welcome... It makes it easy to set up your cut with maximum visibility then reattach extraction with no hassle. In comparison I saw a video which showed the Bosch shroud being fixed with a couple of fiddly machine screws which looked like an inferior system.

I image handle config is something you just get used to, but I am very much enjoying the config on the OF1400 which makes it very easy to use with one hand on the handles and another on the fence or base keeping it properly in the cut.

Thanks for all the advise on the thread!
Just a word of warning on the dust shroud, remember not to unplunge (is that a word?) too far when using bits larger than the hole in the dust shroud :oops:

You will do it and it will make you jump and the plastic bit that twists round to seal it will pop off. Don't worry though it just clips back in again, it's almost like it was designed to be silly person proof (although mine finally broken after about 10 years of doing it).

Great router though, good choice (y)
 

msparker

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Just a word of warning on the dust shroud, remember not to unplunge (is that a word?) too far when using bits larger than the hole in the dust shroud :oops:

You will do it and it will make you jump and the plastic bit that twists round to seal it will pop off. Don't worry though it just clips back in again, it's almost like it was designed to be silly person proof (although mine finally broken after about 10 years of doing it).

Great router though, good choice (y)
Ah yes! I have a large champfer bit in there at the moment and the only way I could use it with extraction was to put the bit in with the shroud already on and it plunged about half way. Note to self, I need to take the bit out before moving anything!
 

Doug71

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Ah yes! I have a large champfer bit in there at the moment and the only way I could use it with extraction was to put the bit in with the shroud already on and it plunged about half way. Note to self, I need to take the bit out before moving anything!
Don't know if you have realised but if you fully open the shroud it will (just) slide over the flats on the collet nut so you can take it off and on easier with bits in, although yes you do need to still plunge the larger bits halfway to clip the shroud in place.
 

msparker

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Don't know if you have realised but if you fully open the shroud it will (just) slide over the flats on the collet nut so you can take it off and on easier with bits in, although yes you do need to still plunge the larger bits halfway to clip the shroud in place.
I did not realise this! I though it was a pretty bad design that it wouldn't go over the collet, thanks for the tip
 
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