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Rivet Cattle Grid

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paulbe

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Hi
First time poster to the forum here....

I have a cattle grid which is basically 3" galvanized steel tubing welded onto a base plate. The ends of the tubing is open and the sides are just the exposed tubing. I have some 3" angle iron which I would like to use to form a border to the cattle grid, the main reason for this is to form a flat edge for tarmac.
Unfortunately I do not have access to a welder, but I was thinking of riveting the angle iron to the tubing, something like this.
Capture.png

Would this work? Would rivets be strong enough to hold the angle iron in place?

The alternative is to bolt the angle iron to the blocks under the grid, like this
Capture.png


I prefer the first option would look the cleanest because it would form a frame to the grid. The second option would not look as nice but it might be a most solid edge because it would be separate to the grid.

So my question is, would the first option work? or would the rivets snap over time with traffic? The grid is for a house and normally only has cars passing over it.

Thanks
P
 

AJB Temple

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Will take ages with rivets and some will break. An arc welder for DIY use is cheap, and will do a better job in half the time.
 

Inspector

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I would hire a welder with a mobile rig. They will show up and have everything on their truck to weld it up. In and out real quick if you have all the metal cut and ready. While they are there have anything else you want welded ready to go. You have already paid for the call out and it won't be much more if anything to do a little more. The welds will be done properly.

Pete
 

clogs

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Vamos, Crete, GREECE.......
yes it does even if u grind most of the galv off...
dosen't ensure the strongest weld either due to contamination but will suffice for this job....
I do it fairly often but only ever weld outdoors.....
If u do ask a welder to do the job for u as Inspector says make sure he knows up front as he may refuse and want paying for the call out....
 

Sandyn

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I would just tarmac up to the first round tube. It would look fine and after a couple of weeks you won't even notice what the edge looks like.
 

TRITON

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I think you should buy a welding machine thingy. Draper gasless mig welder - £150. For what you have to do you could probably self teach yourself in a couple of days. Then you have a welder to find other things to weld. You'lll be like a child with a new toy.
 

Dave Moore

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I think you should buy a welding machine thingy. Draper gasless mig welder - £150. For what you have to do you could probably self teach yourself in a couple of days. Then you have a welder to find other things to weld. You'lll be like a child with a new toy.
A mig set for galvanised is not a good option as you need flux to counteract the zinc. Even using stick rods you would need to choose your rods as some are better than others for welding galv. Better to get a friend who knows what they are doing.
 

Ttrees

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I'd be on the lookout for a used 180 amp arc welder,a battered one for about 50 to 60 euros, doesn't matter on the condition much, as long as it works...
For instance, the electrode holder or clamp is about a fiver at the co-op, tinted glass half that, and a pack of rods no more than 15 for say a big pack of 3.2mm, or 2.5mm ones if the welder is a bit challenged, or the tubing is thin.

My wee shoebox sized 80amp from Lidl (50 quid job) would even do it, but has no fan so would need cooling down, i.e frequent cups of tea, or a long wait to let it cool down properly.

A small angle grinder, flap disc might be nice for cleaning first,
some goggles, a tack hammer and a wire brush is about all you'll need.
Watch Steve Bleile and have at it.

All the best
TOM
 

Duncan A

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Bear in mind that grinding the galv off and then welding (ungalvanised?) angle iron to the grid will set up lots of accelerated corrosion hotspots. At least coat with a cold galv to try and reduce this. I'm assuming it rains in Ireland!
Or, could you not just set some concrete edging slabs around the grid to provide an edge?
 

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