• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Lifes a Beech... (sorry)

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
Hi all

I am nearing the end of a Woodworking Course at my local Adult Education Centre. I am making a laundry basket out of Beech. (I stumbled on this site looking for biscuit jointers).

At Last weeks class I noticed that there was some crack in the wood as follows:




This is either end of the same post. It only occurs in this post and one other rail.

Is this anything to worry about? Essentially when the piece is glued up the cracks won't be seen. The cracks seeemed to have grown over time.
 

Midnight

Established Member
Joined
11 Oct 2003
Messages
1,805
Reaction score
0
Location
Scotland
I could be a mile off track, but it looks like a combination of releasing internal stresses and possibly some drying causing shrinkage too..

FWIW, I've seen this happen in oak too...
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
is there anything I can do to stop it cracking further? Should I scrap the whole post?
 

Midnight

Established Member
Joined
11 Oct 2003
Messages
1,805
Reaction score
0
Location
Scotland
the crack's happened because something has created unequal stresses in the piece. That could be a result of the tree itself, improper drying prior to the kiln, improper drying in the kiln or not letting the stock acclimatise to your shop conditions..

Either way, if it still has more moving to do, there's little you can do about it short of steaming it and drying all over again..

If it's real bad it might be best to make a replacement piece..
 

johnelliott

Established Member
Joined
16 Apr 2003
Messages
1,105
Reaction score
0
Location
Near Swindon, Wiltshire
I agree with the others. If it's feasible to replace the affected part then do so. Otherwise, fill the cracks with some Araldite ( the slow type) warmed with a hair dryer until it's clear and runny, let it set, smooth it down, assemble you piece and go on to the next project.
John
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
thanks for your help guys
 
Top