Compressor/ Makita 18g Nailer

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phil p

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Hi,
Just bought a second hand compressor, its a 6 bar pressure, and bought a new Makita AF506 nailer to go with it, however I’m just slightly, and I mean just slightly, unimpressed by them.
Just practiced on some 38mm CLS with some 32mm brads and they literally just go under the surface, that with the max torque setting setting on the gun.
Checked the Makita manual and it states the pressure intake is between 4.9 and 8.3 max and even though the compressor is 6 bar it’s, according to the pressure gauge, it’s achieving around 7.4 bar so its not that far away from that 8.3 maximum.
If it’s struggling slightly on 32mm brads i fear it would never look at the 50mm brads you can use in it, hence my slight disappointment.
Could it be the newness of the gun and needs a bit “running in time” or is that as good as it will get?
Purchased a 6mm air hose rather than an 8 mm as I believe it would deliver a stronger air delivery to the gun, am I right in assuming this?
Does anyone else have the same set up and have any opinions?
Thanks.
 
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Probably a stupid question, but does the compressor have a regulator on it? Is the pressure you are reading on the compressor before or after the regulator?

Is there a way (temporarily) to put a pressure gauge immediately before the tool's inlet to verify the one on the compressor is being truthful?

Does anyone around you hire the same gun? Anyone you know have a compressor? That would be useful for diagnostic purposes.
 
If its a compressor mounted gauge, then you need a temp gauge at the end of your hose to check actual pressure at the gun.
It's amazing how much loss the type of hose and its size makes.

Give this a watch.
 
Just taken a few pictures with the pressure shown, looks around the 8 bar.
 

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they literally just go under the surface, that with the max torque setting setting on the gun.
I wouldn't expect them to get buried, just below would be fine, any deeper and the piston will make an even bigger hole in the surface, I presume when you say "torque" you mean the depth adjuster?
 
Chippy on site, 2009, kitted himself out with a finishing airnailer, he only mananged to get around 8 shots before the compressor had to recharge! He ended up getting a bigger 25ltr compressor.
 
I wouldn't expect them to get buried, just below would be fine, any deeper and the piston will make an even bigger hole in the surface, I presume when you say "torque" you mean the depth adjuster?
Agree with you HOJ, however the point i was making is that if I used a longer nail, say 40 or 50mm, it wouldn’t even go flush with the surface.
You’re correct, I did mean the depth adjuster screw.
 
Chippy on site, 2009, kitted himself out with a finishing airnailer, he only mananged to get around 8 shots before the compressor had to recharge! He ended up getting a bigger 25ltr compressor.
I seem to be getting around 15/16 before the compressor kicks back in but that’s not a problem for me I can live with that.
 
Hi,
Just bought a second hand compressor, its a 6 bar pressure, and bought a new Makita AF506 nailer to go with it, however I’m just slightly, and I mean just slightly, unimpressed by them.
Just practiced on some 38mm CLS with some 32mm brads and they literally just go under the surface, that with the max torque setting setting on the gun.
...
If it’s struggling slightly on 32mm brads i fear it would never look at the 50mm brads you can use in it...
Does anyone else have the same set up and have any opinions?
Thanks.
I've got an AF506 and brads from 20mm-50mm and it has never had a problem with any of them. Once you have set the depth they all get driven to that depth with no need to adjust the compressor - no fiddling about, it just works...

Remember the top of the longer brads are higher up in the feeder. The striker end of the piston always starts in the same place and finishes in the same place (set by depth adjuster), it just moves further from it's start position before striking the shorter brads.
 
the point i was making is that if I used a longer nail, say 40 or 50mm, it wouldn’t even go flush with the surface
@PerryGunn has nailed it!!, all my second fix nail & pin guns finish flush/just in, no matter what the nail length is, I use any thing from 16mm to 50mm nails (16, 18 & 23 gauge)

Have you tried a 50mm?
 
One day last week my 18g Ryobi battery nailer was leaving the nails about 10mm proud and I couldn't work out why. I spent half an hour stripping it down and oiling it etc whilst cursing myself for buying a DIY grade tool.

It was only when I tried a different length nail I realised there was nothing wrong with the Ryobi, the problem was some 🤡 had mixed a few 16g nails in with the 18g ones...........I can't be the first person to do this?

I know this doesn't help the OP but it's something worth checking if your nail gun is not working properly.
 
@PerryGunn has nailed it!!, all my second fix nail & pin guns finish flush/just in, no matter what the nail length is, I use any thing from 16mm to 50mm nails (16, 18 & 23 gauge)

Have you tried a 50mm?
No, haven’t got 50mm ones however I’ll get some.
 
I have the same nailer and as a few people have said, it will do anything up to 50mm with no issues. Sets the head just below the surface every time. Think mine runs happily from 3.5bar upwards although I only use it on softwood and ply - never tried it on hardwood.
 
I have a cheapy non-branded 18g nail gun that came packaged with my small compressor (B&Q but similar to the smallest Parkside) and it has worked perfectly for years. I was totally amazed as I initially didn't think it would be even worth trying out. Now I've just bought a Milwaukee BFFN as I need a first fix nailer and the existing compressor would be no good. Time will tell how good it is.
 
Hi,
Just....Purchased a 6mm air hose rather than an 8 mm as I believe it would deliver a stronger air delivery to the gun, am I right in assuming this?
.......Thanks.

You are wrong. The smaller diameter restricts the flow of air just like a water hoses do. It becomes very apparent as you use longer lengths of hose. The bigger hose also acts as a reservoir of sorts. To get the most from air tools use short hoses and larger diameters if you can. Hose fittings also have a bearing on how well the air flows. Some are not designed well having have more restriction than others so chose a brand/type with that in mind.

Pete
 
You are wrong. The smaller diameter restricts the flow of air just like a water hoses do. It becomes very apparent as you use longer lengths of hose. The bigger hose also acts as a reservoir of sorts. To get the most from air tools use short hoses and larger diameters if you can. Hose fittings also have a bearing on how well the air flows. Some are not designed well having have more restriction than others so chose a brand/type with that in mind.

Pete
Hmm, so I would be better off with an 8mm hose going off you comments?
 
Hmm, so I would be better off with an 8mm hose going off you comments?
The idea is to keep as large a bore as possible for as long as possible. The large bore hoses are less flexible so add a 'whip hose' between the end of the air line and the tool.

Whip hoses are intended to stop vibration from the air line pulses but, as they are thinner and more flexible, they make manoeuvring the tool a lot easier - manoeuvrability isn't so important for things like impact wrenches but makes a huge difference with tools such as nailers that you often want to use at awkward angles or in tight positions.
 
I just bought one of those coiled extendable ones from Amazon, 10 metres, and it does seem good quality and has good reviews.
 
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