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advice pretty please on morticers and band saws

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lamond

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hello everybody, i had an idea to get some music cabinets made and then market them but alas no local carpenter wanted to touch them as they were all busy,too much work involved
so after a long chat with the wife im going to go it alone and make them myself and also maybe get into making pens bowls chopping boards etc

the question i have is I want to buy new for the guarantee as im setting up the business as best I can,

so ive bought a Axminster AWVSL1000/ Axminster AW106PT2(got this for £475 chipped paint never been used)

now i need a band saw and a morticer so ive got £700 in total

im looking at Axminster AW16BM Bench Morticer and a charnwood W730 14'' Woodworking Bandsaw can you advise and maybe guide a noobie to serendipity

cheers for your help and advice :D
 

RogerS

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Why do you want a morticer? There are many other ways of joining timber faster, quicker and simpler such as Domino's. That morticer I think is a bit of a gimmick with the tilting function. Of much greater benefit would be a control to move the table from left to right.
 

lamond

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hi bud thanks for the reply and if i had the money i would get a festool domino( ive just bought the ts55 ps 300 eq and mft3 table)
and this is why im asking more learned people than myself for help and yes ideally i would like to get one that does go left to right and up and down but i just need a few pointers in the right direction and to gather your thoughts, this is a huge undertaking by myself so wanna get it right,, anybody want to help give me a call 07868850231
 

Allylearm

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What materials and construction are you envisaging for your cabinets and what finish is intended. For a lot of the work you can purchase to spec materials from suppliers of what you require all you would do is construct, finish and ready for dispatch. A quicker option without expense of setup so not running before you can walk, means of course higher construction costs but could be cheaper depending on how much you order at a time. The economies of scale.

"Do not need to answer this but consider it"

Where would sell such product and what market are you intending to supply. Having friends or family saying they want one is different from consumers/traders. What cost is per unit is there already suppliers of the product, how competive are you to them/transport costs/packaging costs. What difference are you bringing to the market and does it meet peculiar specialism so restricting your market potential but could allow for greater return per item (Rolls Royce cost against Mini, either you sell cheap but lots or you sell less more expensive to get same profit return). I could go on and on. not trying to be negative just realistic, in my market I had lots of competition even from Poland and Latvia. Now the economic downturn I have seen even my competition asking me to construct for them as there suppliers are out of business or more expensive to import more importantly. I got out the supply to Wickes/B&Q many years ago and though tough at the start my market grew supplying small Garden Centres in the UK. That market has remained steady for us only latley showing a downturn. We were lucky and had existing market and continual demand for our product range over the last four years, but 2012 could be different as it is slowing up especially the last four months.
 

lamond

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to start with ill be making cases for eurorack modular music which is a very niche market and im a house daddy so have loads of time to potter about so there is not actually any real life stress to make a fortune out of it, ill be mainly using med/hard woods and will to save costs quite happily resaw wood, im getting cedar at 27 m2 at 27mm/cedar £27/ oak 38.50/ash 18 poplar 21/ yew 41/ sapele £33 and im just keeping my eyes open round my area and pick up what i can, ive got somewhere at the back of a retail shop to keep extra wood and ill be operating from my garage, ill probably try my hand at chopping blocks, bowls pens and whatever i think i can achieve well, im also going to offer a service to cut wood to order which knowing the people i do and the village im in, the people will find it quite handy, im just gonna try making lots of different items to sharpen my skills and see how i get on

so any recommendations for light to medium tools , the only thing id like to be able to do is is cut 150mm railway sleepers into 3 for shelving, as ive been asked a couple if times for this already and ive already got about £2000 of confirmed work but no tools


cheers ross( musselburgh originally)
 

Jacob

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Good circular saw with sliding table much more use than a bandsaw. Particularly if you are doing cabinets with boards etc.
 

RogerS

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lamond":1azk9x24 said:
hi bud thanks for the reply and if i had the money i would get a festool domino( ive just bought the ts55 ps 300 eq and mft3 table)
......
Don't dismiss it out of hand. The morticer you are talking about is about £350. A good second-hand Domino will cost about £150 more. I don't know your skill level..only you/the market can judge that..but with the Domino good tight joints are so much easier then getting shoulders spot on square etc not to mention the extra time needed to do a good M&T joint.
 

woodstainwilly

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I would not bother with a mortiser, go for a good pillar drill and a set of good forsner bits
It will cut your mortices just fine. You just need to clean up with a sharp chisel.You then
have a machine that has other uses like drilling holes and sanding curves etc.
Willy.
 

RogerS

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woodstainwilly":2s052mkf said:
I would not bother with a mortiser, go for a good pillar drill and a set of good forsner bits
It will cut your mortices just fine. You just need to clean up with a sharp chisel.You then
have a machine that has other uses like drilling holes and sanding curves etc.
Willy.
I don't really agree with this but admit that ones preference depends on the type of work you're doing and how much of it.

I rarely use my pillar drill. If I need to drill anything then it's out with the Makita. Now my morticer, on the other hand, I'd be lost without it. So quick. No faffing around with forstner bits and chisels!
 

mailee

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I would second that for a morticer. I am on my second machine and wouldn't be without it for cutting mortices. I started with the Record RPM75 and had this for years with a modified fence. I eventually outgrew it and now have a large Record ridgeway floor standing model. I also have a pillar drill but only use that for drilling large holes etc.
 

lamond

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people thank you for your input, thats what i love about forums is the wider views and opinions, i decided on

festool ts55
festool ps300 eq
festool mft3 table
axminster aw106pt pl/thick
scheppach hcm25 morticer
scheppach basato 3 vario bandsaw
axminster Axminster AWVSL1000

and a few other tools to get me started

thanks for your input

cheers ross
 
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