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Veritas variable scraper Burnisher

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Ian Dalziel

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What a fantastic little gadget this has turned out to be. My scrapers have been gathering dust of late and i decided to give them a treat. i have used old saw blade steel for my scrapers and the filing and honing has taken its toll. they are normally filed then honed on the stone then given a rub off the edge of and old round turning tool to get the burr, crude but it always gave reasonable results.
I saw this advertised and thought what the heck i'll give it a go..... it comes with a scraper with the edges already burred but i cleaned these off so as to set it to my liking. it even has instructions for use on the reverse of the box.
The variable burnisher has a carbide rod fixed at an angle inside a brass hub, the hub can then be set from 0 - 15 degrees. i was never sure what angle i was putting into my scrapers but found the angle set to be helpful in that i liked the 10 degree setting. The body of the burnisher is shaped to suit my hand and has a slot running the entire length to allow the scraper to be pulled along the carbide to create a burr. No more careless misses and cut fingers for me.
It works great on old and new scrapers. I also liked the scraper that came with it.
testing my scrapers i pushed and pulled over some twisted grain ash and they cut excellent almost effortless. feather like shavings from whatever angle i used.
I like to feel the scrapers just using my hands but the heat sometimes generated i might consider buying one of their holders.
I must admit that i'm starting to blow the dust off the hand tools more and more.
Would i recommend it........Definitly.......... for seasoned scraper users or new to burnishing process give it a try.........first rate little gadget

regards
Ian
 

Philly

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Ian,
It's a handy little gadget, all right. Surprising how gentle you need to be with it. I used to put a lot of pressure on it and was never happy with the burr. You almost don't want to be able to feel the burr.
(personally, I'm a 5 degree man, myself! :D )
Definitely better than a stack of sandpaper!
regards
Philly :D
 
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Anonymous

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Sounds like a dream tool compared to a standard burnisher! Where did you get it from? Brimarc?
 

Midnight

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Got mine from Axminster..

good review Ian.... and a tasty bench too.. ;)
 

Alf

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Up the proverbial creek
Now I don't want to dent BriMarc's sales, but I've done my bit for them in other ways, so:

You might want to invest in a clever burnisher device, or make something like the one shown in Bob Smalser's guide. I did the latter and used a defunct solid carbide router cutter shank, and oh boy, it's the biz.
FWIW.


Ian Daziel":1cq22tmu said:
I must admit that i'm starting to blow the dust off the hand tools more and more
<snigger>

Cheers, Alf
 

Rob Lee

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Alf":asxdrnt7 said:
Now I don't want to dent BriMarc's sales, but I've done my bit for them in other ways, so:

You might want to invest in a clever burnisher device, or make something like the one shown in Bob Smalser's guide. I did the latter and used a defunct solid carbide router cutter shank, and oh boy, it's the biz.
FWIW.



<snigger>

Cheers, Alf

... and here I was going to hand carry a Christmas present for you when I hop the pond next week .... for shame.

Rob

(machinist's dowel pins can work well for burnishing too...)
 

Ian Dalziel

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(machinist's dowel pins can work well for burnishing too...)
as can old turning tools.......

I did the latter and used a defunct solid carbide router cutter shank, and oh boy, it's the biz.
tried that but wasnt comfortable, just a bit on the short side,

veritas is the safest i've found

Tony i got it from axminster

Alf,

Youve got me all shy now i was going to do a write up on the veritas beading tool but i'll leave it for now.

regards
Ian
 

Alf

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Rob Lee":3mysj6kn said:
... and here I was going to hand carry a Christmas present for you when I hop the pond next week .... for shame.
Damn, damn, damn. Timing's never been my forte...


Ian Daziel":3mysj6kn said:
I did the latter and used a defunct solid carbide router cutter shank, and oh boy, it's the biz.
tried that but wasnt comfortable, just a bit on the short side,
Who didn't follow the link then?
The beauty of that design is you get a set angle of your choice and get to make a fancy turned handle for it too, should you desire (I did, needless to say). And just great for Normites with lots of defunct router bits. I had to actually use a brand new, unused bit from a set 'cos I so rarely use any router cutters now.


Ian Daziel":3mysj6kn said:
Youve got me all shy now i was going to do a write up on the veritas beading tool but i'll leave it for now.
Tsk, didn't mean to do that. Sorry.
Please do review the beader; as long as you don't mind links to scratchstocks as well...*


Cheers, Alf

*Not necessarily from me; BB's very keen on scratchstocks
 

Shady

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Awww, comeon guys, stop: this is one area where I'm really happy with my old screwdriver shank: I love the cheap re-use of an old friend, and I don't want to even think that anything will really make a difference....
 

bugbear

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my old screwdriver shank
I would strongly suggest someone much harder, and shiny to boot.

My burnisher is an old kitchen sharpening steel with the "teeth" polished off.

Works nicely;; as other have mentioned, don't press too hard, no matter which burnisher you use.

BugBear
 
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Anonymous

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Cut a slot in an offcut of oak and drilled a 15 degree hole across it on the drill press to hold a 1/2" shaft of an old router bit yesterday afternoon (10 mins to make). Works great and cost nothing which is good as my christmas list won't stretch to £30 for a burnisher :(
 

Chris Knight

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Tony":t9or9vtj said:
Cut a slot in an offcut of oak and drilled a 15 degree hole across it on the drill press to hold a 1/2" shaft of an old router bit yesterday
Tony,

You must have asbestos knuckles if you can scrape with that much angle on the burr"!
 
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Anonymous

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waterhead37":9z40767k said:
Tony":9z40767k said:
Cut a slot in an offcut of oak and drilled a 15 degree hole across it on the drill press to hold a 1/2" shaft of an old router bit yesterday
Tony,

You must have asbestos knuckles if you can scrape with that much angle on the burr"!
Why so? This is the angle I had read about as the one to use. Seems OK in use with the scraper held at somewhere around 45 degrees to the job.
 

Chris Knight

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Tony,

I find that with that much angle I have to tip the scraper so far forward that my knuckles touch the surface as I scrape - and get hot/sore! I find about 5 degrees plenty for most scraping jobs and generally the lower the angle the longer the burr seems to last
 
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Anonymous

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Thanks Chris.

I will try 5 degrees. Strangely, with the 15 degree burr, I don't find my knuckles touching the wood or even near it. Either :

A) You have exceptionally large knuckles (Chris Neanderthal Waterhead?)
B) I can't use a scraper correctly

It's B isn't it? :oops:
 

Neil

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Snapped a (cheap) router bit the other day :evil: - at least it means I now have a 1/2" shaft to make a Bob Smalser burnisher with. The question is, what angle should I set the bit at? In the article, Bob uses a 15 degree angle, but Chris has said here that a 15 degree burr is way too much. Any recommendations? 5 degrees maybe?

Thanks,

Neil
 
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