SHOW ME- Your plane storage ideas

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Mine has velvet stuck to the bottom of each slot
 
With space in my workshop limited I kept it simple
 

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Angle not sufficient and nothing holding the toe so not super secure. Works ok for the metal #4 and #5.5 but the woodie and shoulder plane with a higher centre of gravity fall off occasionally if I knock it. One to learn from rather than replicate!
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Got mine in a drawer, extremely pedestrian compared to some of these.
My luxury addition is that I lined the drawer with anti rust paper that came on my planer thicknesser.

Ollie
 
Lots of these ideas seem use a flat base so it looks like the plane sits on its iron, is that normal? Like Doug B I have the end on a batten to lift the iron off the surface.
Mine do but I always clean, retract the blade and oil the iron before putting them away.
 
O.K.
If you are a determined protector of tools, prepare to be disgusted.
I drill a small hole far behind the cutter in the sole/bed and hang my metal built planes on a small diameter strong metal nail/pin side by side on my wooden (shadow) wall board.
This procedure keeps them tidy, available and the cutting edge from touching even the wooden wall board.
 
Lots of these ideas seem use a flat base so it looks like the plane sits on its iron, is that normal? Like Doug B I have the end on a batten to lift the iron off the surface.
A bit of a contentious issue, most of us have been taught to lay a plane of its side but Paul Sellers and others state that this achieves nothing as steel is harder than wood. I'm unsure, I see Mr Sellers' logic, but could a finely honed blade be damaged by laying it on a hardwood bench or even on a storage rack/drawer?
 
My planes will be getting jealous as they don't have their own allocated parking spaces. I'm not really a hand tool kind of guy so this is my complete collection. I just pick them up, use them and put them down again (on their side of course 😉).


planes.jpg
 
Kinda miss having the planes and other tools right behind me, bit of a trek now being way over there.

SAM_5323.JPG
 
Here is my cabinet, not yet fully arranged but already functional:

PXL_20220607_074103219.jpg
Found this idea somewhere in internet.
Hand planes are resting on panel that is 15 degree to the wall - it is actually enough already for them to not tip and fall down.
But there are some planks that hold the top of them just in case.
There is a shelf behind them and planes can be tilted up to access it, but it is nearly impossible to do that with all the planes in place.

Top shelf can be lowered down for easy access:
PXL_20220607_074118296.jpg
I plan to mount hoders for spokeshaves and combination, small plow and rabbet planes there.
Apparently, it can hold 10 kg with ease, and I can still lift it up or pull it down.
Found similar shelves in kitchen cabinets catalogs somewhere.
 
Here is my cabinet, not yet fully arranged but already functional:

View attachment 137179
Found this idea somewhere in internet.
Hand planes are resting on panel that is 15 degree to the wall - it is actually enough already for them to not tip and fall down.
But there are some planks that hold the top of them just in case.
There is a shelf behind them and planes can be tilted up to access it, but it is nearly impossible to do that with all the planes in place.

Top shelf can be lowered down for easy access:
View attachment 137180
I plan to mount hoders for spokeshaves and combination, small plow and rabbet planes there.
Apparently, it can hold 10 kg with ease, and I can still lift it up or pull it down.
Found similar shelves in kitchen cabinets catalogs somewhere.
Have you a picture of the glass cabinet they're in?:LOL:
 
I had to look up rammel - a new one to me. The Urban Dictionary definition is interesting.:LOL:
Thought I'd better check. Not quite the same - in Derbyshire "rammel" means odds and ends, bits and bobs, but not necessarily useless. :unsure:
 
A bit of a contentious issue, most of us have been taught to lay a plane of its side but Paul Sellers and others state that this achieves nothing as steel is harder than wood. I'm unsure, I see Mr Sellers' logic, but could a finely honed blade be damaged by laying it on a hardwood bench or even on a storage rack/drawer?

Laying planes on their side came about during the "Golden Age" of the gentleman (ie. amateur) woodworker in the late 1800's. It did make some sense in regards to generally damp surfaces, workshops and sheds and limiting the edge's contact with said moisture. If you look at the texts before this time, however, you will normally see planes placed on their soles, not sides. Only when placed on their soles can you fully protect the cutting edge from other things hitting and banging up the edge. If you're worried though you an always prop the plane up slightly by using a thin strip of wood at one end of it - usually the toe.

Suffice to say, as a planemaker and user for many decades I always have my planes sitting on their soles.
 

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