Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Shallac

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Waka

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
8 Mar 2004
Messages
4,488
Reaction score
3
Location
Weymouth
All

Never used this before so after some help.

What type of finish does it give?
How do you apply?
Does it need cutting back between coats?
Whats the best one to buy?


I know the brains out there will able to help

Thanks

Waka
 

Philly

Established Member
Joined
24 Nov 2003
Messages
6,874
Reaction score
0
Location
Dorset, England.
Waka,
Unable to help on the "brains" side, but here goes.
Shellac is disolved in alcohol-it dries REALLY quick. You can apply it with a brush or rag. You apply 3 or 4 coats at a time as it dries go fast, and can give it a light sand between "courses". I find a couple of courses gives a nice glossy finish and then rub it out with fine steel wool then a coat of wax. Take a look at my recent mahogany table for an example.
http://www.philsville.co.uk/images/complete3.jpg

You can just apply a couple of coats for a "sealer" finish that looks very natural. Shellac melts into itself as you add more coats so you dont have to sand between coats like varnish. It does help level the surface though.

Shellac is available in different shades. Button and garnet are the "brownest" through to bleached "blonde" shellac which is essentially neutral. Depending on the colour of the timber you are using you would choose the shellac that best accentuates the timber. (i.e. I used button shellac on the mahogany to bring out the red/brown colour. Blonde works great on maple, etc.)

French polishing is done with shellac but this a is more intensive way of working. You can use shellac easily to provide a nice natural finish.
Only downsides are-its not very water/heat/alcohol resistant.
upsides-beautiful natural finish-non-toxic. easy to apply. easy to repair. no nasty niffs when dry (so you can use it inside drawers/cabinets without the smell hanging around for years!!!)

Just give it a try mate.

useful link
http://antiquerestorers.com/Articles/je ... hellac.htm

best regards
Philly :D
 

Waka

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
8 Mar 2004
Messages
4,488
Reaction score
3
Location
Weymouth
Philly

Thanks for the adcise and link. I'll give it a try when I get back.

Waka
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Charley":1qxkrtlp said:
I know Alf did a small guide quite a few months ago which I tried and since then I've been hooked... I'll try and find it out for you.
Did I? :? Might be this one (posted under my nom de plume) maybe? Dunno, lots of stuff on shellac in the archives. Use "shellac" as your keyword and just search in the Finishing Advice forum and you'll find plenty. Philly's covered it pretty well though.

Cheers, Alf
 

Waka

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
8 Mar 2004
Messages
4,488
Reaction score
3
Location
Weymouth
Thanks All

Some very useful information there. I'll give it a try in a couple of weeks.

Waka
 

GEPPETTO

Established Member
Joined
26 Oct 2004
Messages
340
Reaction score
0
Location
Vinci (FI) - Italy
Philly":342rufyl said:
........... You can apply it with a brush or rag. ..............then rub it out with fine steel wool then a coat of wax.

Hi Philly, recently I tried this new finish but I have a problem. I finished an old cypress table after I have removed away the old varnish. I applied two coats of shellac with brush and between the two coats I sanded with steel wool but the finish don't have become even. The table is with zones more light and other more dark. With another coat it has improved. After I finished with wax.

Do you have any thought?
 
Top