Boiled Linseed Oil

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Mikegtr

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Completely new to 'Boiled Linseed Oil' as yet to use. Done a bit of research--a few questions so your knowledge welcome. The job in question is to renovate saw handles.

a) Which company do you think makes the best BLO?
b) What type of protective gloves to wear--the thin cheap disposable type? Or thicker gloves?
c) Would you wear protective glasses to apply?
d) Would you use cloth (If so what sort of material) or brush on?
e ) How many coats of BLO to apply for a hard finish?
f)) What grit to sand down between coats?
f) Finish with 'Danish Oil'?

Many thanks.
 
I use a variation of ‘Mikes Magic Mix’

Roughly 1/3 ds of white spirit/ pure tung oil /outdoor satin varnish with about 10% of boiled linseed oil added to enhance the grain. Dries ‘hard’ in a few hrs in spring/ summer. BLO on its own might takes a few days or more.

I use several coats starting at 240 grit going to 2000 grit before waxing. Early coats are applied with a foam brush then wiped down after 5 mins. Last coats are a simple wipe over etc.

This is on slab or cookie cut tables …for a saw handle you need some roughness to aid grip etc
 
Completely new to 'Boiled Linseed Oil' as yet to use. Done a bit of research--a few questions so your knowledge welcome. The job in question is to renovate saw handles.

a) Which company do you think makes the best BLO?
I doubt there's much in it. My last tin was "Bartoline"
b) What type of protective gloves to wear--the thin cheap disposable type? Or thicker gloves?
No need. it's quite harmless and washes off easily if you do it soon enough
c) Would you wear protective glasses to apply?
No
d) Would you use cloth (If so what sort of material) or brush on?
Paint brush. Brush it on fairly thinly in a warm room. Leave for a few hours and rub off with a cloth. Best done energetically to bring up a polish.
e ) How many coats of BLO to apply for a hard finish?
They say once a week for a few weeks and once a month etc , then once a year, but it's just to give you the idea if you are doing a table top

f)) What grit to sand down between coats?
No need
f) Finish with 'Danish Oil'?
No need, it is a finish in its own right and very durable

PS the advice above is for table tops and furniture. If its just saw handles then 1 or 2 applications, letting it dry off well in between. Easy to apply just splash it on and rub it in with your bare hands or a cloth, the work of a few minutes.
Splash it over the blades too - it rubs off with use but helps keep them rust resistant. If already rusted brush off loose stuff and then apply linseed oil. No need to work at it shining up - they pick up a shine with use.
 
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I've only ever used on tool handles, my process, which others may feel is wrong, is to dilute the first coat 50/50 with spirit to help it draw right into the wood, I normally put it straight on with disposable gloves (if you put it on with a rag a good half gets lost into the rag), wait 20 minutes, wipe of any excess and let it dry off, which could take a couple of days. repeat the process with undiluted oil. give it as many coats as it needs until you are getting an even cover with no dry patches (or more often in my case until you get bored). I've never personally had any issues with oilly rags self combusting but it seems to be a thing so store in a metal tin, burn, or dry out flat until completely dry then dispose of them
 
BLO and other drying oils can spontaneously combust if you use rags and toss them into an open garbage can or leave in a pile. Make sure they are spread out individually or kept submerged in a bucket of water. They can't generate heat and start a fire that way. You can toss them into a wood stove if heating with one or put outside in a fire pit and burned. Local burning ordinances allowing. Only telling you this because it seems you are new to using the product and want you to understand so your shop doesn't burn down when you are done for the day.

Pete

TheUnicorn beat me to it by a few minutes.
 
I'm with Jacob, except with old very dry handles I apply once a day for a week; then once a week for a month, and then yearly (very approximately).
It's best if you wipe off excess oil with a cloth after a couple of hours.

As for gloves, I don't bother - and I'm sure my skin looks younger...

Cheers, Vann.
 
I'm with Jacob, except with old very dry handles I apply once a day for a week; then once a week for a month, and then yearly (very approximately).
It's best if you wipe off excess oil with a cloth after a couple of hours.

As for gloves, I don't bother - and I'm sure my skin looks younger...

Cheers, Vann.
Linseeds themselves are edible, the raw oil can be used in cooking and is harmless.
"Boiled" oil has additives to make it quicker curing and hence non-consumable, and in the old days could include lead.
https://www.furnitureclinic.co.uk/blog/raw-vs-boiled-linseed-oil/
https://www.greatbritishchefs.com/how-to-cook/how-to-cook-with-linseed
 
Maybe not for your chopping boards, but I use BLO for various handles and a very occasional wipe I’ve only workbench. I keep a yellow kitchen wash sponge (the sort with a bit of green scotchbrite) with the bottle and it’s always ready for use. Never seen or felt it get hot but maybe I should consider. ..
 
Maybe not for your chopping boards, but I use BLO for various handles and a very occasional wipe I’ve only workbench. I keep a yellow kitchen wash sponge (the sort with a bit of green scotchbrite) with the bottle and it’s always ready for use. Never seen or felt it get hot but maybe I should consider. ..
It takes particular circumstances to get it to self ignite - warm environment, loosely heaped rags freely ventilated, etc, so dropping a loose rag into an open waste bin could be bad news. Better to always keep used rags in a jar with the lid on, or throw them away tightly screwed up, in poly bag etc. They end up safe but useless quite quickly as the stuff hardens.
 
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