Scroll saw issues

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flying haggis

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been given this scroll saw, the motor runs and the blade goes up and down BUT if i clamp the top of the blade in the clamp on the end of the arm the blade wont go up and down and it sounds like they motor is stalling. so if anybody knows anything about these or what make it might be so i gan google it I would be grateful 20220921_150413.jpg20220921_150429.jpg20220921_150432.jpg
 
The upper arm wont go up and down, there is a springloaded clampsysten in there.
Have you tried if the motor works without a sawblade?
 
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been given this scroll saw, the motor runs and the blade goes up and down BUT if i clamp the top of the blade in the clamp on the end of the arm the blade wont go up and down and it sounds like they motor is stalling. so if anybody knows anything about these or what make it might be so i gan google it I would be grateful View attachment 144877View attachment 144875View attachment 144876
Without, seeing the arm assembly and just putting in my two cents worth of advice, by what you are describing is either a tension problem or a locked upper arm bearing. I would just be systematic and go through the saw carefully cleaning and lubricating searching out worn-out or broken parts. Sometimes smallest of parts create the most problems. Motor sounds good then look at the tension, then arm bearings. Have Fun and Have A Great Day.
 
the arm is just fastened to the underneath of the cutting table with two screws and I think it is expected to rely on the springiness of the arm. there doesnt seem to be any way the arm can move other than by bending20220921_150429 - Copy.jpg
 
the arm is just fastened to the underneath of the cutting table with two screws and I think it is expected to rely on the springiness of the arm. there doesnt seem to be any way the arm can move other than by bendingView attachment 144916
Well, if nothing else you spike the curiosity in my soul, do you know when or where this was manufactured? I see the trade make is from General Electric Company England but that's all I can identify. Back in the early 50's Craftsman made a magnetic scroll saw that worked on vibration. I wonder if this is similar. You'll really have to keep us up to speed if you figure it out. I know you have peaked, my interest! Maybe just needs a new spring?
Have Fun, Have A Great Day.
 
Well, if nothing else you spike the curiosity in my soul, do you know when or where this was manufactured? I see the trade make is from General Electric Company England but that's all I can identify. Back in the early 50's Craftsman made a magnetic scroll saw that worked on vibration. I wonder if this is similar. You'll really have to keep us up to speed if you figure it out. I know you have peaked, my interest! Maybe just needs a new spring?
Have Fun, Have A Great Day.
Got Question: Underneath the table where the blade is attached, by chance is that hooked up to cam attachment to the motor? if so, it just might be dirty and need to be cleaned, sort of like the chuck on drill press. Just wondering.??
 
I'm inclined to agree with Rene here. There are small saws that were made that depend on the springiness of the arm, look up Aeropiccola, Shapercraft and Spiralux saws for comparison. We don't have a good overall view of the saw but I don't get the impression this is one of them. This looks to me to be in the Proxxon style which is still made. Manual:

https://www.proxtools.com/store/pc/catalog/manuals/37088 scrollsaw ds115.pdf
With those the top blade holder rises up and down inside a vertical column, sprung to pull the holder back up. The actual arm is ideally static. Some more close ups of the end of the top arm (and an overall three quarters view of the unit) would help diagnosis.
 
Have a good look at the arms, there may be a slight bend somewhere under the table, that once the top clamp is tensioning a blade is enough to cause the internal bearings to seize or bind on a bent pin etc

really like the design btw, has a good throat
 
The blade is only clamped at the bottom.

The black rod with a slot in it is purely used as a guide

Position the wood near blade, lower the guide until it just misses the wood and tighten top clamp , the blade should be free to move

Then start sawing - surprisingly good in use

Not really for thick wood as motor is probably less than 100 watt

You can use a jigsaw blade instead just remember to raise or remove guide
 
I'm inclined to agree with Rene here. There are small saws that were made that depend on the springiness of the arm, look up Aeropiccola, Shapercraft and Spiralux saws for comparison. We don't have a good overall view of the saw but I don't get the impression this is one of them. This looks to me to be in the Proxxon style which is still made. Manual:

https://www.proxtools.com/store/pc/catalog/manuals/37088 scrollsaw ds115.pdf
With those the top blade holder rises up and down inside a vertical column, sprung to pull the holder back up. The actual arm is ideally static. Some more close ups of the end of the top arm (and an overall three quarters view of the unit) would help diagnosis.

You have it in a nutshell, neither top or bottom arm actually move, the blade is bounced up and down by a cam underneath and spring at the top

I would remove the table and check the mechanism underneath but suspect the OP is tightening the upper part which is supposed to bounce, apart from curiosity or need (ie the OP doesn't have a another scroll saw) I wouldn't waste much time on it myself
 
The saw is the same type as fretsaw accessory used on Unimat SL lathe
 

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more pics as promised and thanks again for all the replies so far. if the dats on the black box inside the body of the machine is when it was made its quite old then..
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The purpose of the lower clamp is to stop the blade being dragged out of slot when moving workpiece

On the unimat one it is a fixed tube which makes it a lot harder when doing internal cuts.

With that one you can move it up out of way to place blade in slot.

I think the screw part should be at back of guide ,where it is now would obscure view of where blade cuts workpiece?
 

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