Safe disposal of an unusual nail gun

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I had a few goes with one around 1973, I was 11 at the time, fired 6" nails into a tree in our garden, it buried the nails and stained my undies at the same time, hell of a bang, quickly put it back in the shed, said nothing and forgot all about it

The only harm done was about 25 years later, when the tree was being cut down, absolutely destroyed the chainsaw blade of the tree fella! 😠😠
 
I spoke to my uncle again yesterday and got some more information.

The tool is not a Hilti. It was made by Bonded Direct Fixings Limited. This firm was apparently set up in 1966, ceased trading in 2001 and wound up 2006/7.

The tool is called the Bonded 220 Cartridge fixing tool.

My uncle has:
- The tool itself
- About 1.5 boxes of 2.5" nails
- Half a box of 1.25" nails
- 2 boxes of cartridges (about 50 per box)

The tool has been at the back of a cupboard unused for at least 40 years. No obvious damage or rust. I assume it would work if tried, but my uncle is reluctant to try it. He has no use for it and prefers not to do anything with it.

My feeling is that the tool should be a usable tool but it is probably impossible to get more supplies for it. After his existing supplies were used the tool would be a paperweight.

This still leaves him with his original problem: how to get rid of it all?

My suggestion is that the nails could probably be used with another tool which is still quite common. I even have one myself. It is called a hammer. Based on the responses here I would put the cartridge tool in the normal rubbish and look for a hazardous waste facility to get rid of the cartridges.
 
I used one of these 30 years ago at a company I worked for , We had the task of putting up some dexion racking , Loaded the gun with a nail and picked a cartridge , Some fancy colours ? pulled the trigger and an almighty BANG shocked me :eek: , Blew a 2" diameter hole through the breeze block wall, That's when I found out about the nice coloured shots. I have one and have not used it.
 
Thinking back to the 70's, there were two types, one the cartridge drove the nail via a piston while the other, the nail was driven directly by the cartridge. We had to have a ticket to operate the latter on building sites. Cartridge colours were in ascending strength Blue Green Yellow Red Purple White and Black.
 
So its about 100 cartridges the rest is metal for recycling.
I would ask the police again dial 101 for advice if they are not interested you could follow this link you will get to your local council and should get to details of the local recycling centre. Try phoning for advice or if the owner can easily travel to the recycling centre take them and ask them I think they will tale them from you for proper disposal.
https://www.gov.uk/hazardous-waste-disposal
 
Here is a strange question raised by an elderly uncle (in the UK). He was having a clear out and came across a nail gun from the 1960s or 1970s that used to belong to his father. This is not an electric tool. Instead it uses cartridges that are just like bullets. The tool was used to punch nails into concrete or even steel RSJs. It hasn't been used for decades and who knows if it would still be safe to use. Anyway, he will never use the tool and is concerned about how to safely dispose of it.

He says about 5 years ago the local police had a firearms amnesty and he asked them about the tool. They took some of his documentation about it away for study and decided they weren't interested so he stuck the tool back in the cupboard until he re-discovered it now.

I have asked him to let me have brand name, model number, or any other information he can find. In the meantime, does anyone know about this kind of tool? Any suggestion what he should do with it? His proposal is to cut the gun in half with a hacksaw and put it in his rubbish bin, then bury the "bullets" in the garden. Apart from the waste (if anything is still usable) I would be concerned that at some time in the future after he has long gone a kid could dig up the then rusty bullets and try hitting them with a hammer or something.
If it's in an orange box it's probably a SPITZ. The cartridges came in different colours for different explosive force. It had two chrome safety buttons which had to both be squeezed after the spring loaded shroud was fully pressed onto the item being fixed before it would fire.
I can confirm that the red cartridge would fire a 3mm diam 'nail' into the web of a steel RSJ and was very loud. The cartridge was about the size of a little gem sweet and the outer was plastic.
The safety warnings advised the operator to exclude persons from the other side of a solid brick wall and also to avoid using the red cartridge on anything but steel, I seem to remember!
 
I spoke to my uncle again yesterday and got some more information.

The tool is not a Hilti. It was made by Bonded Direct Fixings Limited. This firm was apparently set up in 1966, ceased trading in 2001 and wound up 2006/7.

The tool is called the Bonded 220 Cartridge fixing tool.

My uncle has:
- The tool itself
- About 1.5 boxes of 2.5" nails
- Half a box of 1.25" nails
- 2 boxes of cartridges (about 50 per box)

The tool has been at the back of a cupboard unused for at least 40 years. No obvious damage or rust. I assume it would work if tried, but my uncle is reluctant to try it. He has no use for it and prefers not to do anything with it.

My feeling is that the tool should be a usable tool but it is probably impossible to get more supplies for it. After his existing supplies were used the tool would be a paperweight.

This still leaves him with his original problem: how to get rid of it all?

My suggestion is that the nails could probably be used with another tool which is still quite common. I even have one myself. It is called a hammer. Based on the responses here I would put the cartridge tool in the normal rubbish and look for a hazardous waste facility to get rid of the cartridges.
I seem to remember Dad taking the gun's unused cartridges to the local police station who were happy to dispose of. He dismantled the gun and took the parts to the scrap yard on two different occasions. He was concerned that they could fairly easily be modified as a weapon by bypassing the safety system. Keeping them apart seemed the best approach.... I'm talking about the 1970s.
They were extremely expensive but when needed were brilliant..... If scary!🫣
 
The main problem has been solved by sending the cartridges to Steve Medlock. Not only are they safely out of uncle's way, they will be used so even better. The tool itself will be given to the local scrapper.
 
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