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Routing composite shapes

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RogerS

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I want to make some elm architraves with a profile to match the existing ones. My initial action was to start looking at spindle moulders but (a) their relatively expensive and more importantly (b) I haven't a clue how to use them, choose the cutters etc.

So I next turned to using my router table and re-read an elderly text called 'Modern Routing Techniques' by Trend. In there they have a few pages on making composite shapes and they refer to a Profile Guide. Trend don't have any. Does anyone know where I can get one from?
 

RogerS

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Hi Alf...sorry but way off! In the book you trace out the profile that you want onto tracing paper. Then using the Profile Guide (that presumably has in profile every conceivable router shape) you work out which cutters to use and in which order to produce the composite shape.

Incidentally, don't know if you've ever used the metal jig in your reply but I did..purchased from the US when I was visiting. Absolute rubbish! First time I tried it all the little metal pins fell out in a heap on the floor!
 

Alf

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rsinden":19pifk88 said:
Hi Alf...sorry but way off!
Bum. :(

rsinden":19pifk88 said:
In the book you trace out the profile that you want onto tracing paper. Then using the Profile Guide (that presumably has in profile every conceivable router shape) you work out which cutters to use and in which order to produce the composite shape.
Sounds great. Could you just use the profiles in a catalogue...? :?

rsinden":19pifk88 said:
Incidentally, don't know if you've ever used the metal jig in your reply but I did..purchased from the US when I was visiting. Absolute rubbish! First time I tried it all the little metal pins fell out in a heap on the floor!
Nah, I have the plastic one which is a pile of poo too - the pins are too coarse to pick out finer mouldings. :roll:

Cheers, Alf

Tsk. Bit of a negative post all round this one - sorry. :(
 

DaveL

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Well Alf beat me to posting the guides I was thinking of. :)

I don't know where to get what you talking about, but in the Trend catalogue they print full size drawings of most of their cutter profiles. :D
I suggest you request a copy if you don't already have one. Then arm yourself with some tracing paper and try out the different cutter shapes against your moulding. Just like being back at school if you play nicely you get to use all of the crayons. :roll:
 

ike

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Sounds like an expensive proposition - all those cutters/machinery for one job. Here's a thought. Round my way, one of the smaller building supplies companys offer a custom moulding service. My sis got some picture rail to match. She gave then a sample, they quoted £15 cutter grinding + the per metre cost. I think the minimum was 15 metres or something like that - not too much anyway. Don't suppose anybody offers a similar service out your way do they?

Ike
 

RogerS

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Hi Ike

That sounds like a great idea. Could you please let me have their details as Stroud isn't a million miles away from me here in Malvern
 

Aragorn

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rsinden
I do this quite often, but don't know the Profile Gauge you refer to.
For complex shapes I use my computer drawing programme to help me work out the best cutters to use from those I've got. Otherwise I just do it by eye - although to do this a small sample of the original is required to offer it up to the piece you're making.
I find most architrave shapes can be cut with the router using a straight bit, roundover, cove and 45 pointy bit.
Sometimes I have to make angled auxillary fences to guide the wood at a funny angle relative to the cutter.
If you are patient and don't have too much to make, I recommend going for it by eye and intuition!
If you're really stuck, send me an accurate drawing of the architrave profile and I'll make up a cut sequence for you.
 

RogerS

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Aragorn, many thanks for your suggestion and help. How many cutters do you have :wink:

I tend to have a few straight and ogees but am always willing to find an excuse to buy more!

I'll PM an image for you which might be easier

Roger
 

Midnight

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When I bought my panel raising bit set, there was a multi profile bit included with the set... great big brute of a thing... but apparently this one bit can cut up to 38 different moulding profiles depending which part of the cutter you use / how many passes you take with the moulding...

To date I haven't built anything fancy enough to give this thing a try so I canna comment re its capabilities, but some of the profiles in the book look pretty nice....
 

Bean

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Aragorn how about a piccie of the angled auxilary fences then, not being able to tilt a router has been a bugbear of mine for a while, and it sounds like you may have solved it.


Bean
 

Aragorn

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OK, Here we go Roger

Here's your original shape that you want to copy, so cut some wood a little wider as shown:



Now over to the router table. You'll need a 60º (or there abouts) cutter and a ¼" roundover:



Now over to the table saw to shape that router cut:



Two more stages at the table saw - two or three to shape the roundover part, and another to cut the main face of the architrave:



Now is a good time to plane that main face if you have a surface planer.
Next it gets a little more complex. You'll need to make an angled auxillary table/wedge as shown, the full length of your router table. This will hold your workpiece at the right angle to engage the 60º cutter:



Two more passes at the table saw to shape the front edge:



And you're very nearly there:



Just need to spend a few minutes with a block plane or sandpaper to smooth out the TS cuts and roundover some of the angles.

Good luck!
 

RogerS

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Aragorn - words fail me. I am totally stunned ..both by the amount of work that you've clearly put into this but also in the elegance of the solution.

Gobsmacked sums it up, I think.

I will let you know how I get on.
 

Signal

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:shock:

WOW!

Top man Aragorn, thats is really quite superb

Thanks

Signal
 

RogerS

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Aragorn - looking at the first table saw cut I am wondering whether I need to get a thinner saw blade (if such a beast exists) since I think that the blade that came with the table saw is probably too wide for this purpose.
 

Alf

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Aragorn,

Blimey. And to think you could probably do the same thing with a couple of planes too...

I'll get me coat. :roll: :lol:

Cheers, Alf
 
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