Replacing large lifting garage door with timber partition and normal door.

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

Jacob

New Luddism. Awake and resist!
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
29,161
Reaction score
5,606
Location
Derbyshire
My garage has double width electric folding door but no normal door so I'm going to replace it with partition plus door, to make it into workshop.
Sorry it's the sort of thing mentioned many times but I'm wondering about the details:
planning a timber stud frame with CLS plus OSB covered with cedar ship-lap. Plus fire-door for strength and security.
Q. 1
The sole plate could go on the existing concrete threshold, which slopes away nicely and wouldn't have standing water on it.
Is there an easy way to make the the sole plate damp-proof other than standing it on a block wall plus DPM? Maybe just build off a tanalised timber with DPM instead? Perhaps with a projecting cill on top with drip groove.
Q.2
What would be the best variety of board on the outside, under the cedar ship lap? OSB or version thereof, or something else?
I'd insulate between studs, and plasterboard inside for sound insulation.

P.S. Just spotted this site which looks interesting. Maybe feather edge cedar for me. https://www.george-walker.co.uk/timber/cladding/
 
Last edited:
Maybe lift the sole plate up 10-15mm on plastic packers. Round foam sealing strip on the inside with mastic joint to stop drafts. Keep the plasterboard 6mm from the floor.

https://www.speedyfixings.com/packers-shims/plastic-square/

What is the OSB doing? Covering the studs with Tyvek roofing membrane before fixing the cedar would make the wall breathable and water resistant. Consider stainless fixings in the shiplap.
 
Maybe lift the sole plate up 10-15mm on plastic packers. Round foam sealing strip on the inside with mastic joint to stop drafts. Keep the plasterboard 6mm from the floor.

https://www.speedyfixings.com/packers-shims/plastic-square/

What is the OSB doing? Covering the studs with Tyvek roofing membrane before fixing the cedar would make the wall breathable and water resistant. Consider stainless fixings in the shiplap.
Thanks for that.
Packers a good idea. I'd go a bit higher than 15mm though. Bolt the sole plate through them. I'll check out foam sealing strip.
The OSB just to make a more solid wall in general and for more sound insulation. Tyvek on outside, under the cedar feather edge.
 


Here's a video i watched a couple of years back on the very same subject.

Thanks for that. Interesting.
I'm doing something very similar but the door will be in regular use. I might do double doors opening outwards so the thing could still be used as a garage.
The critical detail is the sole plate and water ingress. He seems to have more or less wrapped the sole plate in DPM material.
 
I'm also thinking of something similar on a single garage. At the moment my plan is to replace the existing up-and-over door with a roller type and then build a sound proofing stud wall just behind it. It will incorporate a 4' wide access door.
Brian
 
The critical detail is the sole plate and water ingress.

Something else maybe worth looking at is the plastic beams you can buy for composite decking construction. I think they come in standard timber sizes and if you pilot drill, will accept standard woodscrews for securing the studs.

A single composite deck board in direct contact with the ground and a standard timber sole plate on top of it might work. You could run a bead of silicone along it before you screwed the sandwich down and it would be watertight.

https://build4less.co.uk/products/plastic-plank-40mm-x-100mm-x-3-1m-1
 
Something else maybe worth looking at is the plastic beams you can buy for composite decking construction. I think they come in standard timber sizes and if you pilot drill, will accept standard woodscrews for securing the studs.

A single composite deck board in direct contact with the ground and a standard timber sole plate on top of it might work. You could run a bead of silicone along it before you screwed the sandwich down and it would be watertight.

https://build4less.co.uk/products/plastic-plank-40mm-x-100mm-x-3-1m-1
Just the job! That's what I had in my minds eye but couldn't think what to google.
Off to the drawing board!
 
What about fitting bifolds? I was stunned how cost effective aluminium framed double glazed units are.
 
What about fitting bifolds? I was stunned how cost effective aluminium framed double glazed units are.
I'm into wood and anyway want heavy doors for sound proofing and security.
 
2 or 3 rows of brick but resin stainless studs in first. Aim for 7 inch high. The rest is as described plus bolt the soleplate on of course. Americans use ply and a membrane with bobbles so the shingles can be directly nailed and still have an air gap. But I suggest setting it out to allow cross battens counter battens and air breathers.
 
2 or 3 rows of brick but resin stainless studs in first. Aim for 7 inch high. The rest is as described plus bolt the soleplate on of course. Americans use ply and a membrane with bobbles so the shingles can be directly nailed and still have an air gap. But I suggest setting it out to allow cross battens counter battens and air breathers.
Thanks for that but I'm looking into the recycled-plastic beam idea. I didn't know they existed but they are all over the place, including a firm just down the road from me where I'm going to drop in next week, though maybe they only do furniture.

https://www.google.com/search?q=rec...g1NjU1ajBqNKgCCLACAQ&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

I'm impressed by this lot https://www.envirobuild.com/products/solid-anti-rot-joist
 
Last edited:
Cheap version: go down to your local beauty spot at night with an adjustable spanner and liberate the seat from one of the picnic tables.
Smart thinking! Actually there are a lot of them about and pretty ugly too. :unsure:
 
We used composite deck boards on a previous garage threshold .. a selection of damaged/mis-matched colour (although they were all sold as 'grey') from our local shed. A few may have had some chips out of them as well, but we went two boards high.
I think they worked out at around £5 per piece to get rid of them off the shop floor. Stainless fixings, pilot holes, and frame packer wedges to give a gap for frame sealant to fill the gap. Different house now, but I can't see that other than renewing the sealant there'd be much maintenance in the long term.
 

Latest posts

Back
Top