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Panel saw jig (From GWW 143)

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CYC

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Hi all,
I thought I'd show you the Panel saw jig I made based on the article in GWW 143. This is a brilliant idea to get 8x4 sheet down to a manageable size for the table saw.





 

Neil

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Nice one CYC 8) - I bet a few forum members will be making one of these having seen this :)

NeilCFD
 

Neil

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You don't need that much space because the uprights unclip from the rails and can be stored in the roofspace - as long as you can move stuff around to make this amount of floor/wall space in the first place, you can fit one in easily :)

NeilCFD
 

CYC

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That's correct, no space needed to store this jig, well if you have rafters like I do then it's definitely no problem. All that is fixed is the top rail, but this will not be in your way :D
I GWW 143 there is also a design from someone who built an exterior one (that stay there). It's more sophisticated and expensive of course.
This jig cost me about €35 everything included.

I think the removable one is just brilliant :p
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi CYC

Unfortunately you need floor space to bring the jig into play. Sadly, that is not something that I have available. :cry:

Cheers
Neil
 

CYC

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Newbie_neil, this would require about 2400mm by 500mm + some space to walk and work in front of it. This is too bad you don't have the space.

I'll be using this jig this WE as I am starting a project and 5 8x4 sheets have been delivered yesterday. This should make life a lot easier than the last time I tried to deal with 8x4 sheets of 18mm plywood!!!
 

johnelliott

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Cyc, should I point out to the others here that your table saw is perfectly capable of crosscutting an 8'x4' sheet? :twisted:
John-Who also owns an EB PKF255, although not the fancy scoring saw version seeing as he isn't very rich
 

johnjin

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Hi CYC
It looks good to me. In fact it looks very good to me as a very cheap solution to the 8 x 4 problem that most of us encounter. I see from a previous post that that the man of "And the significance is?" fame has either got a very large workshop or never cuts 8 x 4 sheets accurately. Well I certainly understand the problem and the kickbacks that seem to go with feeding these sheets through a table saw that isn't really built for the job. Thanks for the idea CYC I shall file it away to wait for a tuit

John
 

johnelliott

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johnjin":x0up0tni said:
Hi CYC
I see from a previous post that that the man of "And the significance is?" fame has either got a very large workshop or never cuts 8 x 4 sheets accurately.
Trouble with your reading, John? Perhaps you don't know what an EB PKF255 is, or couldn't be bothered to ask? Well, it probably won't interest you to know that the Electra Bekum PKF255 sliding table panel saw that I have (CYC has the fancy V8 version, with scoring saw) is most definitely built for the job.
The humour in the post, which completely passed you by, is that it's all very well having such a saw but one still has to lift the sheet of 3/4" material on to it if one is going to use the saw as such
I myself use lots of 3/4 birch ply which I cut slightly oversize with a jigsaw after laying the sheet out on 4 trestles, and then trim it on the saw to an accuracy that you can only dream about.

I do this stuff for a living, BTW

John
 
G

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I for one could not handle 8x4's,not just because of the weight but my workshop is in my cellar.I do get my sheets cut ,oversize at the woodyard.
Do I detect a bit of needle in this thread or am I missing an 'in' joke.
 

Noel

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Pointy thing, I think...

Rgds

Noel
 

Alf

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jaymar":elyzg60g said:
Do I detect a bit of needle in this thread
Hell's teeth, have I wandered into UK Embroidery again by mistake...? Don'tcha just hate it when that happens? :roll:

I hope we all have the good sense to leave needles and threads with our cross-stitch samplers, eh chaps? Jolly good. 8)

Cheers, Alf
 

CYC

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Hi,
As John E explained the EB PKF 255 is capable to cut 8x4 sheets easily, the problem is to swing the full sheet in place and that's provided your workshop is large enough to let you boldly swing that 18mm tone weight sheet!!! :wink:
So I have put this new jig to the test this WE as I had to cut 5 sheets of MDF (please don't scream, it's not for me). The aim really is to just cut the sheets in half so I can manage the halves on the tablesaw. It was so hard to lift the 18mm MDF 30cm off the ground on the jig, my muscle are aching today!
I am really pleased with it, I used the 1400mm Trench clamping guide and in a few minutes all my boards are cut in half, some in the length, ready for the table saw.
For the price of the jig I recommend it to anyone dealing with 8x4 sheets. Ho You must make the adjustable feet if your floor is not perfectly level AND/OR unparallel to the top rail. It works really well and can be adjusted when the sheet is on :)

I just want to thank the guy in the article in GWW.
 
A

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Pete Martin has pointed me towards this site, an I'm delighted that so many people liked the panel frame that Brian Evans and I made. Incidentally the original idea came from and old Fine Woodworking.
I'm starting to use blackboard more an more because of the weight issue, but whatever you use, you may find a sheet hook a valuable addition to your workshop.
Take a piece of 6mm MDF about 300mm wide. The length is determined by your height. With you arm and fingers pointing dtraight down, measure the distance from the ground to your fingertips. This is the length.
Rout a handhold and line it with a piece of split hose pipe for comfort.
Glue a piece if 25mm square stock along the bottom edge then another piece of 6mm MDF, to form a lip.
You should now have a board which hangs just a couple of inches off the floor.
Hooked under a sheet of MDF, it makes carrying it much easier than trying to hold it by the edges. It doesn't make it lighter though :!:
Look, so easy a girl can do it :D
For more of my stuff please visit www.stevemaskery.co.uk
Cheers
Steve

 

Chris Knight

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Steve,

Welcome to this forum and congratulations on the fine work at your site!

I like you assistant too! A touch of the Woodshop Demos there I feel!
 

Alf

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Hello Steve, welcome to the forum. I always enjoy your articles in GWW.
Steve Maskery":234djkgr said:
Look, so easy a girl can do it :D
As in "you don't need 5 ft long arms like a great big hairy bloke" presumably...? :wink:

Personally I took the female option :p and went shopping. Worth every penny when you have to shift everything about 75 yrds along garden paths to get to the workshop. (DAMHIKT :roll: )

Cheers, Alf
 
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