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Mortice and tenon glue up

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bananas

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I've got to the point where everything dry fits together nicely, a few gaps on the shoulders but I guess that's to be expected in my first attempt. I now need to get it all glued together but have realised that I probably don't have enough clamps.

The project is a kitchen helper stand and has 15 rails into 4 styles (I hope that's the right terminology) there is a slight overlap in the mortices so I've cut a slight angle to the tennons. I only have 2 clamps that will span the entire piece so I'm thinking the best bet would be to glue 2 opposing sides and then fit them together.

I have a few concerns with this method though;
- What can I do if glue seeps into the other mortice making the subsequent tenon too tight to fit?
- 2 clamps will be fine for the first 2 sides since 2 rails are predominantly decorative and won't be under much load, however gluing the whole thing together will have 4 rails that will be under load.
- Finally what is the chance that the sides will rack and stop everything fitting together?

Is it important to clamp everything together or could I get away with gluing it all together at once?
 

sunnybob

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If you can lay it flat with no stress to the joints, you dont need much force at all. A stretchy pvc tape pulled tight around a joint will hold it.
And if you have lots of joints to do at the same time, are you sure your glue wont harden before you assemble it all?
 

bananas

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sunnybob":tp66t04u said:
And if you have lots of joints to do at the same time, are you sure your glue wont harden before you assemble it all?
I hadn't even considered that, how long is wood glues working time? Is there a better type of glue I could use?
 

John15

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I don't think sticky tape will pull up the joints satisfactorily. If you can afford it, much better to buy a few more sash clamps - the aluminium ones are quite OK and fairly cheap Ebay.

John
 

sunnybob

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Different glues have different drying times. I use Bison D3 for normal use, but it sticks pretty quick. In high summer (over35c here) it becomes super glue and you can work on the glued pieces within minutes.
You can slow it down a bit by using a very fine mist spray of water first, but it needs to very fine and it only adds a minute or so.
Under those conditions I use titebond 3, which has up to 10 minutes where you can glue and adjust. Downside with this glue is it dries brown, so no good on pale wood.
If youre looking at many joints it may well be better to glue up sections and then glue the sections together.
I have used PVC tape and even masking tape, completely satisfactory, PROVIDING the pieces arent under any twisting or dropping forces.
On a tenon stood vertical in the vice, with the mortice piece resting horizontally, nothing is needed, the weight of the wood holds it still untill the glue sets.
 

CHJ

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bananas":h179kymq said:
...
I hadn't even considered that, how long is wood glues working time? Is there a better type of glue I could use?
Cascamite is reasonably slow, be careful when reading The tech. sht. as it refers to Gel times not flow times, I only get as little as 20 minutes usable time at UK summer temps, it will need solid clamping to squeeze out excessive adhesive if joints are not wrung together when assembling at these temperatures.
 

RogerS

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CHJ":3aftt2ea said:
bananas":3aftt2ea said:
...
I hadn't even considered that, how long is wood glues working time? Is there a better type of glue I could use?
Cascamite is reasonably slow, be careful when reading The tech. sht. as it refers to Gel times not flow times, I only get as little as 20 minutes usable time at UK summer temps, it will need solid clamping to squeeze out excessive adhesive if joints are not wrung together when assembling at these temperatures.
You need to relocate up here to the far North, Chas. That way your gel time extends to hours ...
 
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