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Jet Supersaw Review in GWW

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Newbie_Neil

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Hi all

If you are in the market for a cast iron tablesaw for about 1,100 then you must buy Good Woodworking and read Andy King's review of the Jet Supersaw.

The front cover of GWW asks "Is this a classic tablesaw in the making?".

Cheers
Neil
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi James

Yes, it is excellent.

I saw it in the "flesh" at Stoneleigh and I was very impressed with it.

Cheers
Neil
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi James

I am still in the process of completing my workshop and if I can possibly fit it in then I will be having one. :wink: :wink: The only problem is that SWMBO has still to agree that I really need the DW P/T, after that I'll work on the saw. :wink: :wink:

By the way, I thought it was incredible value for money.

Cheers
Neil
 

Keystone

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I don not pay all that much attention to reviews in publications. Mostly because I think that there is a conflict of interest. The publications get advertising income from the same company(s) that they are reviewing.

With that said, I'll give you my take on the Jet SS.

It's not a new idea, DeWalt have been making a Hybred Saw for years. I think that the idea of a Contractors/Cabinet saw merger is a good idea. The DeWalt, and Jet, have a nice heavy saw for less than production use shops. With the motor tucked up underneath like a Cabinet saw, the foot print is less. They also weigh more than a contractors saw, and in woodworking machines, heavy is better. Less vibration.

The Jet SS really missed out though IMO. The fence leaves alot to be desired. For the price, you would think Jet would put on their better fence. Instead the used their lowest fence. Motor. I hope that on your side of the pond the put a stronger motor on it. Here it has a 1 1/2 hp, 14 amp 110 volt motor. A saw of this size should have a 2 hp 220 volt motor IMO.

For the price of either the DeWalt or Jet hybred saw I can purchase a Grizzly Cabinet saw. 3 hp 12 amp 220 volt motor, good fence and good dust collection.

If Jet would make some needed changes to the SS, and keep the price the same (I am sure they could) then the hybred would be a good purchase.

Can you guys get the DeWalt hybred over on your side of the big pond?
 

Noel

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DW 746 has been out here for a couple of years. Not too popular. Price with sliding table, outfeed etc about £1,700 or $2,800 in your money. The Jet SS will do well overhere on peice and cast iron table alone.

Rgds

Noel
 
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Anonymous

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Hi Keystone

Good of you to post.

Over here the saw has a 1.75 hp 240 volt induction motor. It is as smooth as anything I have heard. To me the fence was as solid as a rock. I don't know anything about a more expensive fence.

The saw is obviously doing well in the States as it is the number one tablesaw in terms of unit sales. (According to Jet at Stoneleigh 60,000 were sold in the last year)

This saw is about six hundred pounds (eight hundred dollars) cheaper than the DeWalt (DW746 I think).

Over this side of the pond I don't think any other saw comes near it at this price level.

John
 

Scrit

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Hi Keystone

The deWalt DW746 has also been introduced here quite recently. We don't have all that much timber construction here in the UK so DW aren't selling it as a site saw (or at least they are not offering a 110volt version yet - 110volt is normally only seen on building sites in the UK), but they are offering 415 volt 3-phase 3.7kW (5HP) and 240volt single-phase 2.7kW (3.5HP) versions so they probably regard part of their target market as small-end joinery trade - I've been on the receiving end of a bit of marketing by the local DW trade outlet, so I'm quoting from the brochure. I've had a look at one and it sees to be OK, but I'm not sure that the fence is heavy enough for my liking (at least it doesn't bend in the wind like a leaf - or the rip fence on a Maxi 26!). The Jet is also available here - anyone care to comment on its motor power?

Scrit
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Scrit

This information is courtesy of Rutlands: -

"For years our customers have been asking us for a sensibly priced saw bench that has a solid cast iron table. At long last we have found one and we are delighted with it's build quality and sawing performance. With the table manufactured from a solid grey iron, abrasion proof casting and an all steel frame this saw bench will last a life time in any busy workshop.Powered by a 1.75hp induction motor this saw runs extremely quietly and offers vibration free operation. One of it's unique features is that the sawblade tilts to the left. This makes for a safer operation as there is a lower risk of backlash when sawing mitres against the rip fence. The full length rip fence glides along the graduated rail and features a micro adjustment dial for pin point setting.Simply turn the dial, view the measurement using the magnified cursor and lock off the fence using the cam operated lever.Two substantial wheels with steel handles allow for precise blade tilt and blade height adjustment.Both movements are smooth and controlled to ensure accurate blade setting.The main frame of the saw is finished in a durable epoxy powder coating that is chip resistant to make sure the saw will look good for years to come.A T slot is machined into the cast table to the right of the blade for use with the mitre gauge.The JTS250S has an integrated cast iron sliding carriage that runs smoothly on bearings.The mitre gauge on the carriage features a fence with a workpiece hold down clamp and a distance stop for cutting repatitive lengths.The carriage can be locked off when not required."

Motor 1.75hp
Blade Diameter 250mm
Bore 30mm
Max Depth 82mm
Tilt 90-45 left
Blade to rip fence 760mm
Dust Port 100mm
Weight 172kg
Table area with sliding car 1060mm x 685mm
Table area without sliding car 705mm x 685mm

So it's 1.75hp

Cheers
Neil
 
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Anonymous

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Hi All,

After I had reviewed the Jet SuperSaw, Nick Brown, one of the main men at Jet informed me that the actual motor rating on all Jet products is the output, not the input that most manufacturers give.
I was told by him that while an input rating gives you exactly the size of motor used, the output varies dramatically.
IIRC he told me that Jet products are rated at 100%, that is, it will always maintain its stated power at whatever loading it is under. Some manufacturers quote output as well as input ratings as it is a good indication of the motor quality, but these are very rarely measured at 100% loadings, some are 50% for instance, and can therefore only maintain a constantly rated power feed to the tooling 50% of the time. His words, not mine.
He said Jet have a policy of not divulging motor input power, preferring to quote the 100% output as a premium selling point. Valid, but a bit confusing if firstly you don't understand the difference between input and output, and secondly when manufacturers don't give you an output rated at xx% or whatever to compare like for like.
I noted at the time of doing the spindle moulders that the Jet was lower rated on the motor power but the performance was as good as the other two, which I suppose is good back up to the statement made by Nick.

Andy
 

Scrit

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Hi Andy/Neil

Surely Jet are obliged, as are all machine makers, to state what the input ratings in volts/hertz/amps in a clearly visible manufacturer's rating plate in order to facilitate safe (and legal) electrical connection of the machine (I understand that this is legislated for in several places, including the CE-marking directives)? You don't want to install wiring for a 2HP (2.6kW) output motor only to find that it draws 3.5kW on input and trips the circuit breaker every time you start the darned thing. So they must state it somewhere, if only on the back of the machine. deWalt state both the input (3.7kW and 2.7kW) AND the output ratings (2.9kW and 2.0kW or 3.8HP for 3-phase and 2.6HP for single phase respectively, using 1HP = 750watts approx.) on literature about their saws - both are more powerful than the Jet, at least on paper. I agree with the need for a level playing field, but....

As to the left tilt being safer - seems to me that if you have a British-style short rip fence that this argument is a non-starter. I'd be more concerned about the blade being nearer to my fingers at the top of projection than at table level....

Despite the foregoing I am glad that there are two more entrants at this level - since the departure of the smaller Startrite table saws a number of years back we've had little to choose from in smaller, cast-iron top table saws. Well done both manufacturers.

Scrit
 
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Scrit,
I would assume this to be the case, but after looking over the Jet stuff I could only find an output rating. (Unless it was on the motor itself which is of course tucked inside the cabinet, so difficult to get at) Whether this is a loophole in legislation, I don't know, but I can see your point as regards to power requirements for trips etc.
As for the left tilt, yes, it does mean the top of the blade is towards you as you cut, but assuming your crown guard is proprly adjusted it should be no more dangerous.
I thinkl the left tilt is better as you can position the fence closer for narrower bevel rips and the cut piece, while 'dancing' on top of the blade once free of its cut isn't so prone to being trapped against the fence and thrown back.
I would say in my opinion that a long fence that locks back and front with an auxillary fence to slide back for ripping timber so that it doesn't bind at the back of the blade is better than most short fences.
The Jet and DeWalt with the large front shoes they run on keep them parallel and running smoothly, far better than the token efforts some manufacturers make!
I wholeheartedly agree with you about congratulating them for bringing them in to the UK, they have been long overdue.
I still can't believe that the UK branch of Delta hasn't seen the potential in the market and shipped there own cast models over instead of the aluminium ones that everone and their sister seems to think is what we need in the UK.
The price Delta sells for in the USA, even at a £ to $ conversion would still corner the market and it can't be that difficult to stick a 230v motor in and hacksaw the arbor off to meet UK legislation can it? :shock:
Andy
 

Noel

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Andy / Scrit,

I can only assume that Delta reckon the UK and European market are not worth bothering about. Most of the Delta stuff that is marketed here is of Chiwanese origin. At present most of the Delta contractors tablesaws and all of the Unisaws (like Norm's) are still US manufactured.All the Jet range are made in Taiwan. Whether it's a case of economics I don't know. What I do know is that Delta in the US will gladly fit a UK frequency compliant motor for $100. A simple wiring diagram is also provided to rewire (about 3 mins work) to 240V. As Andy mentioned, hacksaw the arbour, stick an NVR switch on it and a few CE stickers. Can't see why Delta don't do this.

Rgds

Noel
 

Keystone

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Anonymous":1p2lwhie said:
Hi Keystone



The saw is obviously doing well in the States as it is the number one tablesaw in terms of unit sales. (According to Jet at Stoneleigh 60,000 were sold in the last year)

This saw is about six hundred pounds (eight hundred dollars) cheaper than the DeWalt (DW746 I think).

Over this side of the pond I don't think any other saw comes near it at this price level.

John


The Jet Super saw is no where near the number one selling saw in the US! The SS has met with very mixed reviews. Both the Dewalt and the Jet hybreds start at about $850, and with add ons go as high as $1200. The Grizzly cabinet saw runs about $925, the Delta Unisaw (Norms saw) runs from $1450 to $1800 depending on the package. It would appear that the Jet SS has had some changes made to it for your market John. The fence being one of them, as well as the motor.
My Unisaw has a 3 hp, single phase, 12 amp, 240volt motor. Standard us household current is 110volt, single phase. Three phase is generally not available in residentail housing areas, and if it was you would raise some questions at City Hall if you had it installed in your house!

Another interesting note about HP ratings on motors.

Craftsman (Sears brand) is famous for rating a motor upwards of twice what another brand will state. They can do this because an electric motor can produce this much right befor it melts. Most brans are rated at the normal sustained rate. Marketing technic that does work with many people. ( Want to buy a 6.5 hp shop vac!)

I think one of the reasons that Delta does not sell in your area is the safty laws you have. Our blade gaurds and splitters do not meat your safty rules. Changing the hertz on the motors really isn't that hard to do. All of the Cabinet saws are 220, and most of the contractors saws are 110/220. Easy to rewire for 220.
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi all

I think what everyone is agreed on is that they would love to see a US manufactured Unisaw over here. If it was going to happen, you'd think that somebody would have heard something.

I would also like to add my thanks to Scrit's and say well done to both manufacturers for bringing a reasonably priced cast-iron top table saw into this country.

From the costs that Keystone has quoted the Jet and DW sell for about the same price in the US. The Jet is selling here using the normal 1:1(Dollar/Pound) exchange rate. DW pricing appears to be about 40-50% more here as they are using a 1:1.45 rate. Giving us a Jet at about 1,150 and the DW at about 1,700.

With the choice available in this country now, for my money, it has to be the Jet.

Cheers
Neil
 

Scrit

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Hi Keystone

Always interesting to read the American perspective on tools. Yes, the guards and splitters are a problem here - EC requirements are for a riving knife to be fitted just behind the blade which tilts with the arbor, but surely this isn't really a difficult thing to achieve? Our motor/braking requirements are, however, a lot more stringent than yours with a requirement to have braked motors on almost all new WW machinery (actually helpful when you want to change a blade in a hurry) and more stringent wiring regulations (magnetic starters, etc). Could I just point out one thing about motor voltages, etc - whilst you have 220 volts in the USA and we have 240volts here, your power supply is at 60Hz frequency whilst ours is at 50Hz - this means that an induction motor (where the speed is "induced" by the electrical frequency) will run 1/6 slower. This translates into a motor that runs hotter as most motors have fans driven off the end of the shaft, and that in turn is a motor which may burn out prematurely.

Scrit
 
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When comparing US/UK prices, remember US prices do not include local sales tax which has to be added. UK prices are usually VAT inclusive.
 

wood1000

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andy king":eq84v00y said:
Scrit,
I would assume this to be the case, but after looking over the Jet stuff I could only find an output rating. (Unless it was on the motor itself which is of course tucked inside the cabinet, so difficult to get at) Whether this is a loophole in legislation, I don't know, but I can see your point as regards to power requirements for trips etc.
As for the left tilt, yes, it does mean the top of the blade is towards you as you cut, but assuming your crown guard is proprly adjusted it should be no more dangerous.
I thinkl the left tilt is better as you can position the fence closer for narrower bevel rips and the cut piece, while 'dancing' on top of the blade once free of its cut isn't so prone to being trapped against the fence and thrown back.
I would say in my opinion that a long fence that locks back and front with an auxillary fence to slide back for ripping timber so that it doesn't bind at the back of the blade is better than most short fences.
The Jet and DeWalt with the large front shoes they run on keep them parallel and running smoothly, far better than the token efforts some manufacturers make!
I wholeheartedly agree with you about congratulating them for bringing them in to the UK, they have been long overdue.
I still can't believe that the UK branch of Delta hasn't seen the potential in the market and shipped there own cast models over instead of the aluminium ones that everone and their sister seems to think is what we need in the UK.
The price Delta sells for in the USA, even at a £ to $ conversion would still corner the market and it can't be that difficult to stick a 230v motor in and hacksaw the arbor off to meet UK legislation can it? :shock:
Andy
I would not dare cut the arbor off. I would kept it the way it is, or get a new arbor made.
 

Shadowfax

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HI Guys
This is a terrific saw but my work shop is not large and although I would like to fit one in I am not sure if it will take up too much room. Does any-one know the actual overall size of the thing, including the rails. In other words what is the footprint of the saw including the rails and sliding carriage. I can see that the fence on the carriage is not too long but it all needs space to be put to use properly, doesn't it?
Cheers.

S
 
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