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Is it possible to rescue a Bandsaw blade?

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Beanwood

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My bandsaw was cutting beautifully - straight, good cut, then I hit the nail (hammer) .
INSTANTLY it has begun to drift badly. The blade still seems quite sharp (it's a 4TPI ), so I suspect the 'set' has been upset.

Is there any way to rescue the blade, or if not, what do you do with second hand bandsaw blades?
 

parvum

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Hi my sympathies, done this too!Can you do a cut and shut to remove the damaged section but still leave enough length to fit and adjust the blade?It is possible to use silver solder to join the blade. Otherwise the blade can be cut up to make frame saw blades drill the end and fit a small pin.If the steel is too hard to drill, heat the last half inch or so to red heat all ow to cool slowly ,stick it in some sand and that should soften it enough to drill.
If all fails Tuff Saws are a great supplier if blades and info, just a happy customer of theirs.
regards Paul
 

Lazurus

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Unless on a big band mill I wouldnt bother, I look at them as disposable items. At around a tenner a go how much is your time worth, I work on £15 an hours in my head to justify if it is worth repairing or replacing.
 

AndyT

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What have you got to lose? You could either work your way along with a pliers style set, or learn hammer setting. For a one off, a length of hardwood would probably do, with a suitable bevel on one arris and some screws to align the back of the blade. Work your way along, hammering alternate teeth, using a small hammer with a narrow peen if you have one, or some suitable punch. Repeat till you're back at the start then flip over for the rest of the teeth.

I've never needed to try it, but don't see any big difficulty. Let us know how you get on. It could be a useful skill if it happens again and you have no spare.

Otherwise, treat it as a consumable and buy another, like you do with abrasives or glue.
 

MikeG.

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AndyT":2t7yzdc6 said:
What have you got to lose? You could either work your way along with a pliers style set.........

I've never needed to try it, but don't see any big difficulty.........
I've done it, and it can work. I produced a rougher cut than the factory produced set did, but it did extend the useful life of the blade. Mark your start point with a marker pen, and be prepared for a very tired forearm.
 

sunnybob

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Given the speed the blade travels, and the average persons reaction time to sudden noises. I would say that ALL of the teeth are either bent, burred or both.

This is really a "how much is your time worth" question. I would guess a minimum of two hours (and possibly 4 as youre learning as you go) to reset an average blade length, with a replacement value of well under 20 quid.
If you decide to repair, take the time to check that there are no snapped off teeth before wasting your 2 to 4 hours.

I know what I would do. 8) 8) 8)
 

MikeG.

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sunnybob":3sjjn948 said:
........ I would guess a minimum of two hours (and possibly 4.......
:lol: :lol: No. Twenty minutes, half an hour.

The point is, if you are using your last blade and in you are in the middle of a job, do you spend half an hour sorting it out, or wait 3 days for a new one to be delivered?
 

desmo11225

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Hello beanwood, I have lengthened the life of well used band saw blades by just putting them into an engineers vice and very lightly filing/grinding the teeth , the guy who put this up said he could do it three or four times but of course for rough work only. desmo11225
 

sunnybob

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Mike, it would take me an hour to get set up, and 30 seconds to decide I'd rather wait. :lol: :lol: :lol:
But then again, I'm never down to my last bandsaw blade, because its three to five weeks for me to get another from Ian. =D> =D> 8)
 

Beanwood

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Thanks chaps.

I've checked the whole blade, and can't see any particular problems, so I will take it off, stick it in the 'Around to it' pile, and hopefully have gotten around to having a go at setting it ready for use on the next bit of wood that even MIGHT contain a nail.

This one was from Tuff Saws, and the replacement I've just ordered will also be from there. They do indeed offer an excellent service, at a very cost effective price, as long as you avoid nails.....
 

Sean Hellman

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Not a problem, especially if you understand the principles of sharpening saws.

If you need to reset the teeth you will need a saw set and remember that a lot of bandsaw blades are set left, centre and right, not left and right like hand saws.

I use a diamond file on top of each tooth, noting the set of the tooth as the file will need to be slightly angled to sharpen the top of the tooth square to its face.
Sharpen the face side of the tooth if you wish with a diamond file.
It is possible to extend the life of saw blades, unfortunately all my ¼ inch ones break an/or twist before I can sharpen them, so Tuff saws has plenty of repeat business. When paying £40 for a ripper blade DIY sharpening pays off big time, only 10 mins or so to sharpen a blade.
 

A.R

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Thanks chaps.

I've checked the whole blade, and can't see any particular problems, so I will take it off, stick it in the 'Around to it' pile, and hopefully have gotten around to having a go at setting it ready for use on the next bit of wood that even MIGHT contain a nail.

This one was from Tuff Saws, and the replacement I've just ordered will also be from there. They do indeed offer an excellent service, at a very cost effective price, as long as you avoid nails.....
Not a problem, especially if you understand the principles of sharpening saws.

If you need to reset the teeth you will need a saw set and remember that a lot of bandsaw blades are set left, centre and right, not left and right like hand saws.

I use a diamond file on top of each tooth, noting the set of the tooth as the file will need to be slightly angled to sharpen the top of the tooth square to its face.
Sharpen the face side of the tooth if you wish with a diamond file.
It is possible to extend the life of saw blades, unfortunately all my ¼ inch ones break an/or twist before I can sharpen them, so Tuff saws has plenty of repeat business. When paying £40 for a ripper blade DIY sharpening pays off big time, only 10 mins or so to sharpen a blade.
 

A.R

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My bandsaw was cutting beautifully - straight, good cut, then I hit the nail (hammer) .
INSTANTLY it has begun to drift badly. The blade still seems quite sharp (it's a 4TPI ), so I suspect the 'set' has been upset.

Is there any way to rescue the blade, or if not, what do you do with second hand bandsaw blades?
Go to this address on our computer to have the choice of saw sets, for setting the teeth.

 
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A.R

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I made myself a grinding set up to regrind blunt band saw blades on the basis that every time I resharpen a blade it cuts the price of a new one by half. the more times you sharpen the same blade the overall cost reduces. I designed it to use a sewing machine motor as the power source.It takes me about 12 minutes to regrind my 88.5" long blades but about 45 minutes to reset it with the eclipse saw set.
 

Beanwood

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I worked out my time was more precious than the cost of a new blade at the moment. That may change in the future, but for now, TuffSaws have satisfied my needs, and I'm once again cutting straight, with the old blade in the same (Ever creeping) corner as blunt drill bits - for future consderation...
 

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