Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Fixing a big hole in resinous pine.

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Osvaldd

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2018
Messages
449
Reaction score
0
Location
NI
So I was planing some pine and all of a sudden this big hole appeared, inside its sticky with resin. Its a drawer bottom so I don’t care if it looks bad I just need to plug it somehow, and I don’t really want to redo the whole thing.
I’m thinking just use epoxy but will it adhere?
any other suggestions ?
 

Attachments

MikeG.

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2008
Messages
10,177
Reaction score
674
Location
Essex/ Suffolk border
Rout it out so that none of the gum is left, then fill it with a two-part woodfiller, and sand smooth when it's dry.
 

thetyreman

Established Member
Joined
4 Mar 2016
Messages
2,939
Reaction score
186
Location
North West
could you not flip the board over so the hole is on the underside? or is that not possible?
 

woodbloke66

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2018
Messages
1,126
Reaction score
9
Location
Salisbury
If you've got the time, rout out all the resin and make a 'dutchman' or patch from another piece of pine; glue in and plane flush - Rob
 

Osvaldd

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2018
Messages
449
Reaction score
0
Location
NI
@thetyreman
same thing on the other side, a see-through hole.

@woodbloke66 @MikeG.
drilling out the dodgy part and using a filler or wood-plug is a good suggestion, my only worry is how wide is this thing, it could be a lot bigger than whats visible right now.

is there maybe some kind of chemical/solvent that could get rid of the sticky stuff, so epoxy could adhere properly?
 

MikeG.

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2008
Messages
10,177
Reaction score
674
Location
Essex/ Suffolk border
What's the fixation with epoxy? If you're so desperate to use it, why not clean out the hole in the way we suggest, and fill it with epoxy? This is another one of those questions where it takes ten times longer to ask the question and pick away at the answers than it would have done to just get on and do the job in the workshop.

Here's another thought. Buy enough timber for the job such that if you run into something like this you just cut another bit. Or another one: check your timber before you cut it in the first place.
 

Osvaldd

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2018
Messages
449
Reaction score
0
Location
NI
Well thanks for the life lesson, mister. I greatly appreciate you taking your precious time to enlighten me with your wisdom.
cheerio
 

Sgian Dubh

Established Member
Joined
12 Oct 2004
Messages
2,264
Reaction score
135
Location
UK
Osvaldd":pync0blv said:
Well thanks for the life lesson, mister. I greatly appreciate you taking your precious time to enlighten me with your wisdom. cheerio
Well, to some extent, that's why people like MikeG, myself, and other professionals are here, because we rather enjoy helping the inexperienced develop knowledge and skills, and to provide solutions. One of my money earning roles, for example, is part-time teaching of furniture and joinery design and making skills - I do genuinely get a bit of a buzz when a student or apprentice suddenly 'gets it'.

Anyway, apart from the sensible advice from MikeG, another solution would be to rip a strip lengthways that encompasses both the knot and the void. True up both the sawn edges and glue the pieces back together. Then find another narrow piece of wood to make up the requisite width and joint that on to the original edge. Alternatively, rip a strip off of what you've got to remove the knot and void, and find a piece wide enough to join to the new edge to make up the requisite width. Both solutions remove the need to do anything with the void except put it and the knotty bit in the scrap pile. And, as you say, it's only a drawer bottom, so perhaps the visual aesthetics aren't critical. Slainte.
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,030
Reaction score
481
Location
Bristol
I'm no professional but I hope I can recognise good advice, born from experience. Woodbloke66 already suggested a 'dutchman' patch so I'll just add some pictures to show some I did, on the hidden side of a chest of drawers, covering old screwholes.

First, cut a diamond of thin wood, similar to the bit with a flaw in.


Mark around it and chisel out to a suitable depth


Glue in the patch.


After the glue is dry, plane back flush.


If it was on a show surface, I would have made more of an effort to match the grain, but this was just for practicality, like yours.
 

MikeG.

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2008
Messages
10,177
Reaction score
674
Location
Essex/ Suffolk border
Nice photos, Andy. I'd just add that putting a very slight taper on the sides means that wedging the Dutchman in with a few taps of a hammer will close up all the joins tightly.
 

Ttrees

Iroko loco!
Joined
18 Nov 2012
Messages
2,381
Reaction score
96
Location
In me workshop
Whats the chances of that knot beside the resin pocket being full of seeping resin also, since its so close to it?

Tom
 

woodbloke66

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2018
Messages
1,126
Reaction score
9
Location
Salisbury
AndyT":3elm4q9b said:
I'm no professional but I hope I can recognise good advice, born from experience. Woodbloke66 already suggested a 'dutchman' patch so I'll just add some pictures to show some I did, on the hidden side of a chest of drawers, covering old screwholes.

First, cut a diamond of thin wood, similar to the bit with a flaw in.


Mark around it and chisel out to a suitable depth


Glue in the patch.


After the glue is dry, plane back flush.


If it was on a show surface, I would have made more of an effort to match the grain, but this was just for practicality, like yours.
As Mike said, nice pics. There's also a very large dutchman (at least 100 x 75mm) in the top surface of my Wegner style 'wishbone' desk, caused as I used a tired bandsaw blade to cut the veneers and one went a bit thin :lol:

DSC_0016.jpg


Fortunately, the 'dog n'bone' sits on top of it but if you look very carefully...

IMG_2630.jpg


...you can just make out the slight difference in the grain direction. If you didn't know it was there you'd have a job spotting it - Rob
 

Attachments

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,030
Reaction score
481
Location
Bristol
I reckon you've got away with that one, Rob!
 
Top