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JFC

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Ive got 6 Oak doors to make for a passenger ferry , 4 raised and fielded panels , M&T construction . I usually use exterior mdf for the panels to stop any cupping or warping but as these doors are oak they need to be out of oak . When ordering the timber i put this question to the timber yard and they said solid bits of oak but as its down to me if any cupping or warping happens i thought id ask the forum on their past experience :D . The panels will be around 250mm x 32mm x 600mm and raised and fielded both sides , would you do it in solid oak or rip the panel down and oppose the grain leaving maybe a bad grain match ?
 

jasonB

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Glue it up from 3-4 strips with the grain alternated or aligned so it is all quatersawn to keep movement to the minimum. Dont glue the panels in place so they can move, prefinish them before assembly then if the do shrink you won't see any unfinished wood.

Jason
 

JFC

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You would do as many as 3-4 i was thinking 2 but they are going to a high moisture content area so maybe best to over buy and get a nice grain match going , some how i just know they are going to warp whatever i do :lol:
 

jasonB

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If you deep cut them from quatersawn stock you could get away with two pieces and a nice book matched pattern.

Jason
 

superunknown

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I would go for quatersawn too. Make sure the moisture content is ok, consider where they will be going. I guess on a ferry the air could be quite damp? Are they exterior doors?

2 pieces glued up sounds about right to me :) I don't think you would get to much movement from them.
 

JFC

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Yes they are outside and from my experience of boats 1 year is 5 years . Ive found the moisture content thing to be a bit of a wild goose chase as no one can guarantee the moisture content on any timber as it can change like the weather .
 

jasonB

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If you are using American White Oak, since being kiln dried it has probably been on a boat for a week or two so should be just right :D :D let alone where ever & however it has been stored since arriving at the docks.

No substitute for owning a moisture meter and hand selecting if possible.

Jason
 

JFC

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I didn't think of the fact its already been on a boat ! =D>
maybe best to leave it outside for a bit rather than in the workshop and stack it level with spacers and sash weights on top .
 

JFC

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Already got the timber AWO and its kiln dried but has been PAR just a week ago so in affect is open again yes ?
American red oak ? is that like japanese oak ? i need some of that to finish my fireplace ! And why not red oak i have loads of furniture ( not made by me ) that is japanese red oak )
 

SketchUp Guru

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American red oak--which is really a number of species--isn't good for outdoor or marine applications because the it has little rot resistance and because there is no blocking tyloses, red oak is porous along its length. This can wick up water and hold it internally much easier than white oak.

I don't know how Japanese red oak compares to the American red oak. Maybe a different critter altogether.

Here's a picture comparing red oak(on top) and white oak endgrain. You can see the openess in the red oak.

 

JFC

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Ive put a picture of Jap red oak on my very very bad website , maybe you can tell if its the same timber from the grain pattern . id love to know as alot of 1930s furniture in the uk was made from this oak and getting hold of red oak thro timbmet and the like is like rocking horse poo .
 

SketchUp Guru

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If it is that last shot, I can't tell for sure. It doesn't look like the oak that I am familiar with. I wonder what a Google search would turn up.

On a slightly different topic--get a PlungeBar from WoodRat for that DW625. You like having it on your mill.
 

JFC

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Yes it was the last pic and i thought the pull on the grain or after the grain looked like it could give the end grain you showed . Never mind my search for a little bit of jap oak goes on :lol:
Re the mill .... do you have 1 ?
 

JFC

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Seems all my posts end up about the mill :lol: Great bit of kit !
I have a post on tool reviews if you'd like to add a little it seems the wood rat has the monopoly over here .
 
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