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Customs declarations and brexit

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RobinBHM

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Yes, CANZUK is an idea - and it's a good one
It seems to me to be imperial nostalgia - and it's a long way down the priorities for CANZ.

Australia trades mostly with China
Canada trades mostly with America
UK trades mostly with with its nearest and biggest trade partner.
 

RobinBHM

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Life expectancy, healthcare, variety of food and goods available to buy, ease of travel - you name it. The UK isn't declining, it's getting better
But surely any valid comparisons are with other similar economies now.

I can't see how a comparison with previous generations gives us much of a clue as to how the UK is doing.

In terms of metrics, the UK isn't great...it's somewhere around 18th when comparing to EU 27 for life expectancy, retirement age, healthcare provision, pensioner and child poverty.

In terms of inequality, in work poverty, hunger, public services, cancer treatment etc, the UK isn't amazing.

I suspect people living in rented properties working with a zero hour contract....won't be thinking the UK is great.
 

Jake

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Geography is not everything, but it's a really heavy and immovable influence.
 

Doug B

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Ha! Right after talking about the relative hardships of the lives of millenials, this gets put up on another (IT) forum I read:
View attachment 107911

I mean, it's written for giggles, but it's a reasonable summary.
Millenials: they've got cause to be annoyed :D
I think being born around 1920 takes some beating for miserable prospects, & those that survived had bigger challenges than dealing with Brexit, they got us to where we are now what we need to do is rise to the challenge like they did.
 

MIGNAL

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Let's not forget that Cheshirechappie was on here circa 2016 telling everyone that the EU was about to collapse, that an EU army was about to be formed and Turkey was about to join the EU - that had collapsed.
 

Lons

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But surely any valid comparisons are with other similar economies now.

I can't see how a comparison with previous generations gives us much of a clue as to how the UK is doing.

In terms of metrics, the UK isn't great...it's somewhere around 18th when comparing to EU 27 for life expectancy, retirement age, healthcare provision, pensioner and child poverty.

In terms of inequality, in work poverty, hunger, public services, cancer treatment etc, the UK isn't amazing.

I suspect people living in rented properties working with a zero hour contract....won't be thinking the UK is great.
I voted to remain in the EU Robin but being fair I don't think anyone could honestly claim that those situations were caused by Brexit, all existed while the UK was a member of the EU.
OK projections can be made that Brexit will make it worse but they are still projections not fact...yet!
 

Cheshirechappie

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Let's not forget that Cheshirechappie was on here circa 2016 telling everyone that the EU was about to collapse, that an EU army was about to be formed and Turkey was about to join the EU - that had collapsed.
I did not say those things.

I think the EU may well collapse at some time, but it won't be quick.

There are proposals to form an EU army. Again, this won't be quick.

I have never expressed a view as to whether or not Turkey will or won't join the EU.

If you're going to ascribe statements to people , try and make them accurate.
 

Jacob

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I think being born around 1920 takes some beating for miserable prospects, & those that survived had bigger challenges than dealing with Brexit, they got us to where we are now what we need to do is rise to the challenge like they did.
But Brexit is an unnecessary and self imposed challenge.
Could say the same about WW1 though we didn't vote for it - it was imposed on us by govt, but WW2 was unavoidable (perhaps).
The big challenge we now have is climate change. Brexit is a trivial side show in comparison but won't make things any easier.
 
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MIGNAL

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I did not say those things.

I think the EU may well collapse at some time, but it won't be quick.

There are proposals to form an EU army. Again, this won't be quick.

I have never expressed a view as to whether or not Turkey will or won't join the EU.

If you're going to ascribe statements to people , try and make them accurate.
Must have been another Cheshirechappie. . . .
As for the EU collapsing. Well yes, 'some time' can be a mighty long time. A bit like all those benefits of Brexit. I mean when exactly are they going to pop along, 1 year, 5 years, 15, 20, 50? Right now it's odds on that Britain will collapse long before the EU. That's another thing the Brexiteers kept very silent about.
 

MIGNAL

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But surely any valid comparisons are with other similar economies now.

I can't see how a comparison with previous generations gives us much of a clue as to how the UK is doing.

In terms of metrics, the UK isn't great...it's somewhere around 18th when comparing to EU 27 for life expectancy, retirement age, healthcare provision, pensioner and child poverty.

In terms of inequality, in work poverty, hunger, public services, cancer treatment etc, the UK isn't amazing.

I suspect people living in rented properties working with a zero hour contract....won't be thinking the UK is great.
Yes. Look up the proportion of over 65's in comparable countries - Germany, France, Italy, Spain and even Portugal.
Despite the UK being 'younger' we still managed to have the worst covid death rate. We are also an island which didn't seem to give us any advantage at all.
 

sploo

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Must have been another Cheshirechappie. . . .
As for the EU collapsing. Well yes, 'some time' can be a mighty long time. A bit like all those benefits of Brexit. I mean when exactly are they going to pop along, 1 year, 5 years, 15, 20, 50? Right now it's odds on that Britain will collapse long before the EU. That's another thing the Brexiteers kept very silent about.
The only timeframe given I believe was from the haunted Victorian pencil Rees-Mogg; of perhaps 50 years for Brexit benefits. It's unclear as to exactly what benefits he was referring, but given that his world outlook is firmly of the Victorian era he might have been eluding to taking 50 years to achieve the social standards of the Edwardian era.
 

Jonm

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This post is off topic in relation to not being about woodwork. It is about Customs Declarations with particular reference to the Channel Islands and the effect Brexit has had on this.

I am trying to forget about the Referendum and all that followed. We have left the EU. I can wind myself up about it but there is nothing to be done at the moment. We have to get on with life. We are one country at the moment with real problems of Coronavirus, Scottish Independence and the unrest in Northern Ireland. We have to stop defining ourselves as Brexiteers or leavers or remainers.

Griping on about Brexit or crowing about vaccine rollout in UK compared to europe where cases are rising and more people are dying does not help.

The EU will evolve without us, maybe in to something we would not want to rejoin or maybe we will want to rejoin. But that will take many years and there is nothing we can do about it at the moment.

The much quoted WW2 generation did not gripe on about the Political mistakes leading up to the war, not least Britain’s lack of support for France when Germany remilitarised the Rhineland. Hitler could an should have been stopped then, but hindsight is a wonderful thing. That generation got on and dealt with the situation they were in and we should do the same.

Really if you want to talk about the advantages and disadvantages of Brexit then set up a thread to cover it.
 

pidgeonpost

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With regard to 1920 not being a good time to be born, my late Dad would probably agree.
Born into a large and hard-up family (7 kids) in a depressed and desperate post-WW1 England, his father was a labourer in the local gasworks so money was tight.
His first glimpse of life's inequalities was when he got a Saturday job caddying on the local golf links. He could earn as much in tips in one day as it took his father 48-50 hours to earn.
With little prospect of local work, he joined the Royal Navy in 1935 - not the greatest career choice at that time if we apply our old friend 'hindsight'.
Comes along WW2, and he experiences being too hot, too cold, bombed, shot at, sunk, and a variety of other things, sometimes all at the same time, and in various places on the globe.
Post-WW2 and Britain experiences Groundhog Day, ie depressed, desperate, we're on the bones of our @rses again, and there's not much call for Petty Officer Telegraphists in civvy street.
No choice but to get on with things to a degree. He retrained, worked hard and we got by. My parents never owned their home, had precious few holidays (all but one in the UK), and for much of my childhood the family car was a motorbike and sidecar.
Dad's years in retirement were easier and gave him chance to do a lot of reading and research - all from library books, no PC.
He was quite well-read on European history, and the formation of the EU. He used have a grumble about it at times, but he was glad it existed and that we were part of it. He'd been through WW2 and the post-war years, and he valued the fact that the EU had been instrumental in helping to maintain a peace in Europe that has lasted for over 70 years, Balkans excepted. There seems to be little mention of the value of that peace from either side of the great Brexit debate these days.
 

Phil Pascoe

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he valued the fact that the EU had been instrumental in helping to maintain a peace in Europe that has lasted for over 70 years, Balkans excepted. There seems to be little mention of the value of that peace from either side of the great Brexit debate these days.
1/ the EU didn't exist until 1993.
2/ it didn't keep the peace, Nato and Uncle Sam did. That's probably why it's not mentioned.
 
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