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Stuff for craft fair? Ideas wanted!

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julianf

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Cutting boards should ALWAYS be end-grain !
I think there is application for both -

For example, a cheese serving board could be called a cutting board, as you generally need to still cut the cheese from the blocks it's served in, but the forces involved do not require it to be end grain at all.

My family is largely non meat eating, so, in reality, our own board is pretty much a bread board. Which would be fine with not being end grain also. And, besides, most people would cut meat on a HDPE (or whatever it's called) hygienic thing now, rather than scrape away at an end grain to clean it.


So, personally, I think end grain are mainly just for show now. Which I'm fine with. Ours looks nice and is heavy enough to not slide about all over the place.
 

Tusses

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It amazes me what people will buy, I have seen dried sheep poo in 500g bags as organic oder free house plant fertilizer on a stall and they sold the lot
As Alan Sugar would say , "Sell what Smells" ! .. oh wait , it might be the other way round ! lol
 

Tusses

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I think there is application for both -

For example, a cheese serving board could be called a cutting board, as you generally need to still cut the cheese from the blocks it's served in, but the forces involved do not require it to be end grain at all.

My family is largely non meat eating, so, in reality, our own board is pretty much a bread board. Which would be fine with not being end grain also. And, besides, most people would cut meat on a HDPE (or whatever it's called) hygienic thing now, rather than scrape away at an end grain to clean it.


So, personally, I think end grain are mainly just for show now. Which I'm fine with. Ours looks nice and is heavy enough to not slide about all over the place.
Also , End Grain will split and warp in the dishwasher ... yes the buyers will !!! , even if you have told them not to , then word spreads , don't buy from them , ours fell apart etc. ..
 

paulrbarnard

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Cutting boards should ALWAYS be end-grain !
I would expect end grain on at least two faces. No need for those to be the top and bottom in my opinion. Very few people are breaking down half a pig into chops anymore. Our chopping boards are more ornamental than practical as we use plastic cutting boards sat on top of the fancy walnut slab that sits proudly on the countertop. It does see light cutting of cheese and things like that but I don’t think the cleaver has been out of the drawer for at least two decades.
 

Tusses

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I used to buy cheap chopping boards from Ikea , and laser engrave (could CNC) yes no on them .. sold quite well at £20 a pop .. mostly for display , but the other side can still be used
1631451096650.png
 

julianf

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I used to buy cheap chopping boards from Ikea , and laser engrave (could CNC) yes no on them .. sold quite well at £20 a pop .. mostly for display , but the other side can still be used View attachment 117618
Im not set up for laser, but I'm on a few laser forums, and that's exactly where the Chinese board shot that I posted before came from!

Buy cheap, run though the laser, and sell for money.

I've just mailed a local chap on FB who is selling a length of used oak block counter top for £20. It would be good for a whole stack of end grain boards.
 

Sandyn

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Maybe led powered resin lights or something? (led mainly as then theyre not 240v, and you can just flog a Class II plug in transformer, and not have to be concerned with certification, etc.)
Sorry to be a party pooper. There is so much confusion over certification. Unfortunately it just doesn't work that way. If you make/assemble a product as you describe from sourced parts, you are still obliged to have it approved, unless it's prototype/sold in very limited numbers/ special product, but something like you are describing which is sold to the public should be approved.
Of course there are many many people who sell stuff and never get it approved and there are never any problems. There are also companies that get the product approved and it catches fire and people are killed. A huge percentage of products sold on the internet from far east sources, their certification isn't worth the paper it's printed on, but there's no way of holding them to account. But the bottom line is, if something tragic goes wrong, you could find yourself in trouble. It is easy to do a self certification, but again, if something goes wrong, you could lose everything you own. Even if all the sub-assemblies are approved, as the manufacturer of a product, you still have to do some kind of certification. That's the doomsday scenario, but I always think people should be aware of the reality of certification. The low voltage directive covers most normal electrical things but the general product safety directive has catch all clauses for just about everything you can imagine that isn't covered by a specific standard,

Looking at the type of experience you have and some of the amazing things you have produced, what about combining the CNC in wood with the silk screening of metal and make some personalised items where a printed metal part is embedded in a bit of wood. House numbers would be a idea perhaps? or what about having all the letters of the alphabet designed in jigsaw looking parts, so the buyer could assemble house names. The wood would be engraved to accept the letters. It would be designed in such a way that the wood was pre-drilled for screws. You supply some classic looking brass screws with the kit. The advantage would be scale of production, you make them in largish quantities. Typical house names are not too long, anything longer than your standard would be to order.
 

Richard_C

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If its a local event, can you leverage that? Either genuine handmade in..... or some local identity. Here in/near Cambridge you could think about punts or something with college names printed, anything near you?
 

J-G

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why? for example I made this and use it every day.

View attachment 117616
From the appearance it seems that you don't use it as a 'chopping' board. :)

The point really is that pressing a knife - or any sharp implement - through food into 'end grain' allows the wood fibers to recover whereas if you do the same to 'face grain' you will sever the fibers - assuming that you are not fastidious enough to make sure that you always align the knife along the grain of course.
 

J-G

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I would expect end grain on at least two faces. No need for those to be the top and bottom in my opinion. Very few people are breaking down half a pig into chops anymore. Our chopping boards are more ornamental than practical as we use plastic cutting boards sat on top of the fancy walnut slab that sits proudly on the countertop. It does see light cutting of cheese and things like that but I don’t think the cleaver has been out of the drawer for at least two decades.
I certainly don't 'butcher' a pig - or even half - but I do dice some beef/pork/lamb and trim the fat off bacon etc. but my (live in) grandson uses a cleaver for virtually everything he cuts up. We use two chopping boards daily and occasionally a 'dished' version - which is also end-grain - with a mezzaluna. Oh - and I wouldn't even think of using a plastic board - I've seen one that's been in use for a week!
 

Belgarn

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I've done a few craft fairs and focus mainly on chopping and serving boards. I do both end grain and face grain and also use both at home. Certainly the end grain ones hold up better over time but both can be re-sanded to like new. In my experience, the face grain boards tend to sell quicker as they are cheaper. Also easier to batch out. Unfortunately I don't price mine as if I was running a business. I look to cover the cost of materials plus a bit extra. Many of the crafters I have spoken too, have told me to increase prices and they think I'd actually sell more. I've seen other woodworkers at these events sell what is basically a sanded board with no other work for the same price I sell the end grain ones, so I often wonder.....

Anyway, onto the question in hand - other ideas might include:
Tea light holders - very easy and quick (get a kitchen hinge cutting bit as they are about the right size)
Christmas tree decorations - hardwood snowflakes go down really well
Live edge coasters - very quick and easy to just chop up a log of the right diameter. Easy to make a holder as well with a larger diameter log slice and some dowels. The log slices sold much better than end grain ones I made with leftovers.
Bandsaw boxes

I find things can sell much better if there is a story behind the item. I managed to get a load of old teak from the local pier which burned down. People like to own a bit of local history.
 

Owd Jockey

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Remember a series of Harry Enfield sketches called "I saw you coming". The wine and glass holder for £172 in one of the above posts reminded me of this. Here is one example:-
 

Jonzjob

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Coasters? These are some I made for commissions, but they look just as good without the ne=ames, or you can pyrograph them at the fair for the punters. I like doing the pyrography and the punter feels they have something special.

Coasters set 6-01.JPG


Coasters-03.JPG


Beech coasters 1.jpg
 

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Tusses

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someone mentions Tea Light holders .. AFAIK these will need to have heat proof inserts , metal glass ceramic etc.
 
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