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Clamping 45 Degree Leg-Rail Joint

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John15

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45deg leg-rail joint 001.JPG


I've made a practice 45 deg. leg rail joint using dowels for a small table.
The joint is good but to close it I need a method for clamping onto the slope of the rail. The dowels are square to the two mating faces. Any suggestions greatly appreciated.

John
 

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Distinterior

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"Hot Melt" glue a 25mm MDF block at the corresponding angle on the rail. Once the joint has been glued, clamped & dried , just knock off the MDF block.
 

Phil Pascoe

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As above, but I would try to keep the glue on the outer edges where it's easily softened. I wouldn't just knock it off because it might take some fibres of wood with it.
 

clanger

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Could you treat it in the same way as clamping a mitre frame and glue up all four legs at the same time by wrapping a ratchet strap around it (with suitable protection to the edges)?

HTH,
 

custard

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Personally I wouldn't glue a cramping block on to the apron, at least not for this particular job. Removing the cramping block can take a few whiskers of wood fibres from the apron (or at the very least leave some residue) dealing with these requires a clear run for you to get a plane onto the job. But that small 3mm reveal you've got at the leg prevents that, and even if it's flush you don't want to risk shaving out cross grain on the leg.

Consequently I'd glue 45 degree cramping blocks onto a strip of ply or a bit of scrap, and cramp that onto the apron.

These photos illustrate the general principle, say these bits of scrap represent the leg and the apron,
Cramping-Block-01.jpg


Here's the cramping block, this is a commercial version, but you could make your own and have a 45 degree block instead of a circle, the key thing is the block is now cramped on rather than glued on,
Cramping-Block-02.jpg


And here's glue-up pressure being applied across the joint,
Cramping-Block-03.jpg
 

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custard

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I've no idea what they're called or where they came from. I've had them for years.

Gluing a 45 degree block to a strip of ply would be just as effective and a lot cheaper. I only got them to see if these were somehow more resistant to slipping (they're not!). If you glue things that aren't in the 45/90 degree format (ie chairs) then there's merit in a P shape rather than a 45 degree block.
 

tony_s

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I recently made a small desk with the legs at 45 degrees to the aprons. I was faced with a similar dilemma and opted to attach the legs with sliding dovetails. This removed the need to use clamps at all.
 

John15

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Success with clamping my trial joint this morning using Custard's method. I have a hairline gap but that's more to do with my carpentry than the clamping.
Many thanks again for all your suggestions - much appreciated.
John
leg-rail joint 001.JPG
 

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woodbloke66

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custard":974dbejz said:
I've no idea what they're called or where they came from. I've had them for years.

Gluing a 45 degree block to a strip of ply would be just as effective and a lot cheaper. I only got them to see if these were somehow more resistant to slipping (they're not!)
Yep; the way I stop these things from slipping is to use some d/s tape to stick a bit of 240g sandpaper to the underside. Sorted :D - Rob
 

OscarG

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John15":2t6et9oy said:
Success with clamping my trial joint this morning using Custard's method. I have a hairline gap but that's more to do with my carpentry than the clamping.
Many thanks again for all your suggestions - much appreciated.
John
That's really good!

Wish I'd thought of doing that a few weeks back. I had to glue on something at 30 deg angle and did a poor job of clamping it, sliding all over the shop!
 
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