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Best Style Of Stabila Level

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pollys13

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Looking into levels, the consensus points to Stabila being the most accurate, durable. I searched the forum, seems various opinions about the various Stabila styles. I would welcome any other opinions?
Cheers.
 

Doug71

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I love the R type levels from Stabila, feel really nice in the hand. Good for joinery but the brickies I know don't seem to like them so I guess depends what you are using it for.

If you want something a bit special check out Superior Levels, think Peter Millard has a video on them.
 

Trevanion

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Has to be the Stabila 83S type, absolutely flat and dead-accurate, feels great to use with a bit of heft to it, you won't ever need another set of levels if you buy these and look after them.
 

ColeyS1

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Trevanion":m6i226xr said:
Has to be the Stabila 83S type, absolutely flat and dead-accurate, feels great to use with a bit of heft to it, you won't ever need another set of levels if you buy these and look after them.
That was certainly how the old ones use to be. I know of two new 83S's that haven't been accurate. I covered over the offending bubble so it didn't get used by accident.

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Jonathan S

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+1 for stabila 83S......thinks next time I'm shopping for a level I might have to try the superior levels that Peter Millard has......they look beautiful!

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Doug71

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Trevanion":8yh15drt said:
you won't ever need another set of levels if you buy these and look after them.
I had a 4' one, realised I had left it on site, went straight back to get it, it was gone and surprisingly nobody had seen it.........
 

MikeG.

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This is one of those issues........

All levels are simply an aluminium extrusion and a tube with a liquid. None of them are better than any other. What you pay for with the premium brands is a higher chance that the particular one you have in your hand in the shop is accurate. That's all. So, if you want to save looking through 3 or 4 cheaper ones before you find one that's bang on, go for a Stabila. If saving enough money to be able to buy another tool with the difference is worth it to you, then pick a few nameless ones off the hook and test them. One or two of them will be 100%, and a few won't be. It's 5 seconds to check the accuracy, and I'd do that anyway even with a Stabila, so I can't see what's to be gained by spending the extra money.
 

Trevanion

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Anyone here ever watch "Monk"? Detective with serious OCD issues :lol:

Natalie: Mr. Monk, it's level. See? The bubble is right in the middle.
Adrian Monk: I think it's broken.
Natalie: Mr. Monk, the level is not broken! It's a bubble on a stick.
Adrian Monk: Let's just make sure...
[He unwraps a second level and holds it next to the first one]
Natalie: You have two levels?
Adrian Monk: I use this level to check the other levels. It's my level-checking level.
Julie: [deadpan] How do you know that one's not broken?
Adrian Monk: That's a good question. I take my level checking level to the hardware store twice a year to have it re-calibrated.
 

Doug71

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Like I say depends what you are doing with it. The 83S are great for chucking round site but I am normally working in customers houses so like the fact the R beam has the rubber end caps, means I do less damage to things. The end caps also help it grip the wall if you are using it for drawing plumb or level lines, sounds gimmicky but actually works really well.
 

Lons

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I have 4 Stabila levels only one of which is still dead accurate. That's what happens when allowing the lads on site use your gear. :roll:

All are 83s I beam type which are great to use. The thing that get me is that in the USA they are ( or were ) guaranteed accurate for life but not in the UK which is a pita.
 

pollys13

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I'm looking into door linings, making door frames, early days yet chaps, early days:) I saw this, How to install an interior door lining plumb, level, square & 'in wind' so you can easily hang a perfect door in it
https://www.carpentry-tips-and-tricks.c ... ining.html
He seems to know what he is doing. Regards tools, he says, Spirit levels (600mm + 1800mm for the head and legs) he also mentions a framing square, is why I asked about that.
I've searched the forum, most of what I found, was about different methods of fixing lining into different materials.
Earlier today have to admit I was at B&Q and bought a Magnusson box level set, 4 levels for £40. I have the really long Veritas precision straightedge, as Mike suggests will check for accuracy.
If thay are out, back they go.
 

Logger

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I recently learnt from one of my clients you don't need levels.

I fitted 3 dormer windows i had made, made sure all nice and level. Hadn't been gone 30 minutes when i get a message that windows look great, but i had fitted them wrong! When i return, i am told that the correct way to fit them is not use a level , but to make sure they sit flush against the out of square window fascia boards. Doors frames downstairs need to be level with 250 year old walls as well, no need for "those yellow things."

So it turns out levels are not a tool you need at all.

Nick

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Phil Pascoe

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Don't just test them for being straight, test them for actually working as levels - if something shows as being level, reverse the spirit level and it should still show as being level.
 

MikeG.

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I once took a bricky's level (and line) off him, and told him to build a fireplace by eye. I wanted it looking wonky. It still ended up perfectly level......
 

pollys13

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phil.p":1eu675d5 said:
Don't just test them for being straight, test them for actually working as levels - if something shows as being level, reverse the spirit level and it should still show as being level.
OK hadn't thought of doing that.
 

MikeG.

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phil.p":12qxaryg said:
Don't just test them for being straight, test them for actually working as levels - if something shows as being level, reverse the spirit level and it should still show as being level.
The best way to do this is to prop one end on something against a wall, and move it to level. Mark under the un-propped end with a pencil line where you can't see it without bending down. Flip the level over and repeat. If you've got two separate lines, your level isn't accurate (and horizontal is exactly half way between the two marks).
 

pollys13

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MikeG.":2edhnxh8 said:
phil.p":2edhnxh8 said:
Don't just test them for being straight, test them for actually working as levels - if something shows as being level, reverse the spirit level and it should still show as being level.
The best way to do this is to prop one end on something against a wall, and move it to level. Mark under the un-propped end with a pencil line where you can't see it without bending down. Flip the level over and repeat. If you've got two separate lines, your level isn't accurate (and horizontal is exactly half way between the two marks).
Thanks again, will do :)
 

lurker

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My Stabila lives in a purpose made wooden sheath. I just use it for critical jobs.

I bought a four foot cheap one from toolstation, I did the measure one way and then the other on their counter before buying. I am pretty sure it was less than ten quid.
It’s just as good, but you don’t have to be too precious about it’s use.
 

Lons

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MikeG.":24794sjz said:
I once took a bricky's level (and line) off him, and told him to build a fireplace by eye. I wanted it looking wonky. It still ended up perfectly level......
I built a large floor to ceiling fireplace in a modern house from 200 year old handmade bricks my customer had bought. I spent ages sorting out the decent bricks and had it half built when my neighbour came home, she wasn't happy, said it was too straight and she thought I'd have used the wonky, cracked and damaged bricks. #-o
No way was I going to demolish it so I ended up taking a brick hammer and a scutch to take corners off and rough it up a bit and she was delighted with the end result though I wasn't so keen.

She has been asked a number of times if the fireplace is original and the house built around it so I guess she got what she wanted. :)
 
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