Axminster AW106PT tables problem

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Jolyon

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Hi
Just trying to get my (second hand) Axminster AW106PT set up properly and am having difficulty with the planer tables. As I understand it, the infeed and outfeed tables are supposed to be coplanar, i.e. both should be parallel with the floor, except that the outfeed table should be fractionally lower. But my outfeed table slopes downwards, so that the far end is about 2-3 mm lower than the endest near the cutter. There are a couple of adjustment screws on the outfeed table, but they can only raise/lower the table on one side. The other side (which has the height adjustment knob) is fixed.

I don't know if is related, but my problems started when I couldn't get the fence square to both tables at the same time. The only way I can achieve this is if I accept the outfeed table sloping downwards, which doesn't seem right. What am I missing please??
 
D0377CC7-47FF-490F-A19D-B82ADBD4A766.jpeg

This is what I mean. Big gap to the left
 
You need to get that level, and as you said so that the two top tables are in line. I suspect that it's a nuts and bolts job. Investigate the structure of the machine.

There's no way you can plane wood with it in that condition. :-(


Looking harder, I suspect that it's about how the hinge and clamp bodies are attached to the table sides. Is there something that can be slackened off?
 
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When it comes to alignments, think of the machine holistically because the top tables also need to relate to the cutterblock as does the thickness bed. The cutterblock position is probably a given, in which case that's the base reference ...

Trial & error, take it slowly, stay calm ...
 
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Hi
Just trying to get my (second hand) Axminster AW106PT set up properly and am having difficulty with the planer tables. As I understand it, the infeed and outfeed tables are supposed to be coplanar, i.e. both should be parallel with the floor, except that the outfeed table should be fractionally lower. But my outfeed table slopes downwards, so that the far end is about 2-3 mm lower than the endest near the cutter. There are a couple of adjustment screws on the outfeed table, but they can only raise/lower the table on one side. The other side (which has the height adjustment knob) is fixed.

I don't know if is related, but my problems started when I couldn't get the fence square to both tables at the same time. The only way I can achieve this is if I accept the outfeed table sloping downwards, which doesn't seem right. What am I missing please??
we have a newer version of that and all these levels are adjustable. and the outfeed should be fractionally higher, (by the amount you wish to plane off), not lower
 
I had one of those and as you say one side is fixed at the factory, it looks like it should adjust but there is a pin through fixing it in place. I have heard of people removing the pin to adjust them, not sure if @MikeK did when he was fine tuning his Holzmann version?

It does look more serious than a slight adjustment to the table though, as said could be on the hinge mechanism?

I think there is some confusion here about the outfeed table height, the tables want to be parallel and the outfeed level with the top of the knives.

I'm sure I once read that Felder set their outfeed tables sloping very slightly downwards and my friend says they set his like that but I never really understood why, don't know if anyone can confirm this or knows why?
 
I have an old cast iron machine now, but in the past, with relatively lightweight machines such as this, I found it best to start by levelling the from the bottom up, in such a way as no twist can be introduced into the body of the machine.

I first realised this with a P/T, which I ended up putting onto a heavy ply base, which had adjustable feet. I found that this worked better than simply fitting the feet to the machine. It also meant that I could add ballast to the bottom of the machine, making it more stable and quieter.

It was surprising how, having levelled it like this, very little adjustment was needed.
 
Thanks for the advice. When I was trying to move it (on my own) it fell over a couple of times (it weighs 150kg so not lightweight in my book! and very top heavy) and something might have got knocked out of true. But I can't see that anything is actually bent, which is good.
Am I right in thinking that the problem could as easily be the infeed table as the outfeed? So the infeed might actually be sloping up rather than the outfeed sloping down? It looks to me from the aligment of the table and the piece that holds it that this might be the case - and there are some nuts that might benefit from slacking off.
 
@Doug71 is correct about the pins holding the two tables in a fixed position on one side. I have no idea why the manufacturers did this, but the pins render the adjustment hardware for that side useless, and the two bolts in each table can be removed without affecting the performance of the machine.

Your AW106PT appears to be from the same factory as my former Holzmann, or at least the assembly lines source components from the same foundry. Here is the thread where I documented the fun I had with my P/T before selling it and buying the SCM F30G just in case it helps you on your fun-filled journey.

https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/threads/holzmann-hob260nl-p-t-issues.134325/
Here is a screen shot from your image showing the two pins that need to be removed. On my Holzmann, two of the pins came out easily, but two had to be drilled. Once the pins are removed, the tables can be fully adjusted.

Screen Shot 2023-04-08 at 22.44.44.png



With regards to the setup, I never paid much attention to the relationship of the tables to the floor, I adjusted the four leveling feet so the machine was not obviously leaning and didn't rock on any corner. The fun begins with setting the tables and knives once you are happy with the placement of the machine.

I recommend identifying the one critical component that cannot be adjusted, moved, or fettled and use that item as the reference for all other settings. In the case of these machines, this is the cutter block. Assuming the bearings are in good order, it will not move in the chassis, so it is the reference point for all other adjustments.

Here is the order I recommend after removing all of the knives from the cutter block and removing the four pins identified above:

1. Set the height and angle of the outfeed table. I think the recommended height above the cutter block is 1mm, but this should be in the manual. You will have four points to adjust, and each adjustment affects the other three. Once you are happy with the outfeed table, you will not be touching it again.

2. Set the infeed table to its highest position and start the same four-corner adjustment procedure to ensure it is level and coplanar with outfeed table.

3. Set the thicknesser table so it is level with the bottom of the cutter block. The front to back angle of the table doesn't matter, but the side to side angle does. You should have four grub screws in the base of the thicknesser pedestal to set the angle. As with the planer tables, each corner adjustment affects the other corners, so make little adjustments until you are satisfied.

4. Insert the knives into the cutter block and adjust them to the correct height and ensure they are parallel to the outfeed table. This is also a good time to ensure the knives don't hit either of the planer tables.

There are different schools of thought on the correct way to do this, so you can do your own research and determine what works best for you. Since my machine had three knives, instead of the more common two knives, I set the blade height so it was as close to exactly the height of the outfeed table as I could get it.

The popular method for two-knife cutter blocks is to set the knives a little proud of the outfeed table because the knives are making only two cuts in the wood with each rotation of the cutter head. I never bought into this, because the two and three-knife cutter heads rotate much faster than I push the wood over it, so I don't have to worry about any scalloping in the surface.
 
Ah, thank you so much. A mine of information! Though I might need to get back to you ...
 
A level may not be the most ideal tool for setting your tables co planar, I tried using a decent stabila level and found it was not the right tool for the job if you are seeking feeler gauge accuracy and so brought a veritas straight edge which is designed for just this sort of application.
 
Agreed. I lost everything in a fire 6 months ago including my straight edge and the level is all I have to hand right now.
 
Luckily the insurers paid out and so I’ve been able to replace a lot of rubbish hobby machines with old trade ones (which, however, bring their own problems…)
 
Luckily the insurers paid out and so I’ve been able to replace a lot of rubbish hobby machines with old trade ones (which, however, bring their own problems…)

However, within reason, solving those problems can be seen as an investment. The same can not be said of cheap new machinery.
 
So - all sorted, I think. The pins came out fairly easily, and then I realised that even though you can't change the height on one side, you can change the angle of each table, thanks to the eccentric nuts next to the pins. The height adjustment bolts on the other side then let you get the tables parallel in the other plane, so that the fence is square to both tables. Thanks to all
 

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