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By lurker
#1335974
I have not baked since I was 13 at school.
I am now “slightly” older :lol:
Her majesty is a great cook so I have no need.

Not sure why, but I decided to have a go, I mean how hard can it be?
Used the National trust recipe, the mix ended up a bit sloppy. But my philosophy is it’s not a fault but a design opportunity, I threw in some more self raising .

Results were visually poor and a bit too sweet, but otherwise ok.
The flaff was worth the look on her majesty’s face when she got home, not often she is lost for words :D

Will have a few more goes, until I get it right.

Then.......cheese scones (hammer) (hammer)
By Rorschach
#1335978
Woah there, who cares about how they turned out, what is is important is how you pronounce scone!

After that argument we can start on jam or cream first. lol
By Geoff_S
#1335980
Rorschach wrote:Woah there, who cares about how they turned out, what is is important is how you pronounce scone!

After that argument we can start on jam or cream first. lol


It's pronounced "scone".
By Rorschach
#1335984
Geoff_S wrote:
Rorschach wrote:Woah there, who cares about how they turned out, what is is important is how you pronounce scone!

After that argument we can start on jam or cream first. lol


It's pronounced "scone".


You fool, it's obviously pronounced "scone"!
By Geoff_S
#1335986
phil.p wrote:If it were intended to be pronounced sconn it would have been spelled sconn. :D


Patarto 8)
By Rorschach
#1335989
phil.p wrote:If it were intended to be pronounced sconn it would have been spelled sconn. :D


We can agree there, now lets disagree on cream and jam ;)
User avatar
By Phil Pascoe
#1335990
If you've the same N.T. recipe book as I have some of the recipes are on the sweet side - the Cornish splits are too sweet as well.
Jam before cream, otherwise the cream melts if the scones are warm. Cream teas in Cornwall should be splits not scones, anyway.
By Fitzroy
#1335991
A scone is one of those things that like, a scotch pancake or drop scone, benefits from a mix on the dry side and as little mixing as possible to incorporate wet into dry. Too wet, or excess mixing, and the scone will spread out or bake to a tough finish.

Fitz.
By lurker
#1335992
I always take mine plain, particularly the cheese ones
By lurker
#1335994
Fitzroy wrote:A scone is one of those things that like, a scotch pancake or drop scone, benefits from a mix on the dry side and as little mixing as possible to incorporate wet into dry. Too wet, or excess mixing, and the scone will spread out or bake to a tough finish.

Fitz.


I have already realised quantities need modifications as you proceed, it’s not like a cutting list is it?
I have to be careful mixing cement otherwise it ends up too sloppy.
User avatar
By MikeG.
#1335995
It's pronounced "skon". Glad I was able to settle that for you.

Now, as to the recipe.........buttermilk is the magic ingredient. If it doesn't have buttermilk they'll be OK today but nearly inedible tomorrow. If it does have buttermilk, you'll eat them all today anyway.
By Rorschach
#1335997
Cream first because if it's proper thick Devon cream rather than runny Cornish muck then you can't spread it if you put jam on first.
User avatar
By Phil Pascoe
#1335998
Tesco are stocking a Polish buttermilk for £1 a litre. Worth freezing.