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Dibs-h

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Came across someone selling a load of wooden planes of various sizes, so went to have a look yesterday and ended up buying almost all of them,






The smallest 2 have no markings, whilst the rest are a mix of Tyzack, Sorby and a few by Mathieson & Son. Also included 2 levels by Rabone & Chesterman, 2 spokeshaves and a few mortice gauges.

Dibs
 

jimi43

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Dibs my man...I declare you officially BONKERS!!! :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

Dare I ask how much you paid for all of those gems?

What on EARTH are you going to do them?

What is the collective noun? A wallop of woodies? A wedge of woodies......or even a wealth of woodies...

Anyone any other suggestions! :?:

Mad...totally and utterly mad! :wink:

LUVIT!! =D>

Jim
 

yetloh

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I think I would be in some difficulty trying to smuggle that lot into the workshop.

Jim
 

Dibs-h

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The chap wanted £15 each for the large & medium ones and £6 for the smaller ones and with there being about 22 in total - that began to add up. Got them all for £150 in total. I thought it was a bargain.

Dibs

p.s. My son has already asked if he can have some - so will probably work out want he & I want to keep and may sell the rest.
 

AndyT

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Dibs my man ... I declare you officially WISE!

A good starter collection of under-appreciated historic tools. A nice haul indeed - you now have enough to properly equip a workshop!

One that stands out at a glance is this moulding plane:

dibsplanes.JPG


which has an older style rounded top to the wedge, and looks as if it might be a little bit longer than the standard 9 1/2". Any visible maker's name on it, or any chance of a closer picture?
 

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Cheshirechappie

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Dibs - you need to aquire four more woody try-planes. You currently have sufficient jacks and smoothers for one each day of the week, but you can only get to Wednesday with trys. That means you can only do smallish jobs Thursday-Sunday.
 

Dibs-h

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Cheshirechappie":zb6dvi9i said:
Dibs - you need to aquire four more woody try-planes. You currently have sufficient jacks and smoothers for one each day of the week, but you can only get to Wednesday with trys. That means you can only do smallish jobs Thursday-Sunday.
Sorry to sound dense. :oops: What's try-plane?

Dibs
 

Cheshirechappie

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Strictly speaking, wooden jointers are longer again - up to about 30". I think they're not all that common.

What you have there are try (or trying) planes, used to true-up stock after roughing close to dimension with the jack. The longer body allows them to ride over humps and skim them off, where a shorter plane would follow the contours. Once the stuff is 'tried' straight, flat and out of wind, the smoothers (coffin-shaped little fellers) are used with a fine set for final surface finishing.

Sorry if I'm teaching you to suck eggs, but your reference to google suggested you may not be totally conversant...
 

Dibs-h

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Cheshirechappie":24dor1tf said:
Strictly speaking, wooden jointers are longer again - up to about 30". I think they're not all that common.

What you have there are try (or trying) planes, used to true-up stock after roughing close to dimension with the jack. The longer body allows them to ride over humps and skim them off, where a shorter plane would follow the contours. Once the stuff is 'tried' straight, flat and out of wind, the smoothers (coffin-shaped little fellers) are used with a fine set for final surface finishing.

Sorry if I'm teaching you to suck eggs, but your reference to google suggested you may not be totally conversant...
Never had any wooden planes before - so on a slight learning curve. When you posted yesterday about try planes, admittedly it was a cursory look on Google. Since then, I found the following,

converting-rough-sawn-boards-by-hand-try-plane-t14378.html

post #3, by MikeW, and also

http://www.wood-shop.co.uk/shop/Planes/ ... _1862.html
http://www.fine-tools.com/rauh.htm

and the longer ones I have are 22.5" long, so I wonder if 1 man's jointer is another's try plane? I suppose there probably is some black and white definition somewhere.

Cheers

Dibs
 

Blister

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Nice one Dibs :mrgreen:

Now see if you can make a display rack and hang them on the wall in your living room :lol: :lol: :lol: 8)
 

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Dibs-h

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Andy

Sorry for not posting a closeup yesterday.




I've measured the length of it and it is 9.5" long.

Dibs
 

Dibs-h

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Blister":126ebr8n said:
Nice one Dibs :mrgreen:

Now see if you can make a display rack and hang them on the wall in your living room :lol: :lol: :lol: 8)
You read my mind somewhat! :mrgreen: Some probably will end up getting displayed around the house.

Dibs
 

Cheshirechappie

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Hi Dibs!

I think you're probably right when you surmise that different people use different names (and after all, does it matter what it's called as long as it does the job it's supposed to?), but the 'authority' I use is "Modern Cabinet Work" by Wells and Hooper. My copy is a reprint of the 1922 3rd edition, which I aquired from Amazon, to take advantage of their usual discount pricing.

Messrs Wells and Hooper define a 'jointer' as between 26" and 30" long, and a 'trying' or 'true-ing up' plane as usually 22" long, though shorter ones are known as 'panel planes', and have a removable slip on the bottom edge allowing the iron to work close in to a raised panel.

So if Messrs Wells and Hooper are wrong, so am I!

I've only got one woody bench plane, a jack bought years ago from Bristol Design. Learning to set the iron is a bit of a fiddle, but once you 'get it' it's a nice plane to use. It glides over the wood much more sweetly than my metal planes, and you can shift a lot of waste with it. I've seen it written somewhere that the bench for wooden plane work should be about 3" lower than a bench for metal plane work, as it allows you to 'get over the plane' more easily (taking account of the extra depth of the woodies). I can see what's meant by this, but I use mine on my 'normal' height bench, and like a lot of things that are not strictly 'right' by the book, it seems to work OK. Mind you, I'm not planing all day every day.

I think it would be fun to select the best of those planes, sharpen them up and have a go. If nothing else, it'll add to the variety of life, and if you really don't get on with them, you can always do as Blister has!
 

Dibs-h

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The plan will be to de-rust whichever ones need doing and then to sharpen them. Sharpening - now there's the making of an (mis)adventure. :wink: :lol:

1 or 2 - the blades have had some use and are really short!

Dibs
 

Corneel

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That moulding plane sure looks old. Early 19th century or so. It doesn't have the broad chamfers of the 18th century. Does it have an extra fence or did the wood split? You should look on the front tot see if you can make out a makers name.
 

Dibs-h

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Corneel":1peusncf said:
That moulding plane sure looks old. Early 19th century or so. It doesn't have the broad chamfers of the 18th century. Does it have an extra fence or did the wood split? You should look on the front tot see if you can make out a makers name.
Came as it was, no fence or anything else. I don't think the wood split - or if it did, it must have done so early on. I've looked everywhere on the plane & iron, no makers marks whatsoever. Just a previous owners initials and surname all over the place.

I'll have another look this evening tho.

Cheers

Dibs
 

AndyT

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Dibs-h":2y68dn8d said:
Corneel":2y68dn8d said:
That moulding plane sure looks old. Early 19th century or so. It doesn't have the broad chamfers of the 18th century. Does it have an extra fence or did the wood split? You should look on the front tot see if you can make out a makers name.
Came as it was, no fence or anything else. I don't think the wood split - or if it did, it must have done so early on. I've looked everywhere on the plane & iron, no makers marks whatsoever. Just a previous owners initials and surname all over the place.

I'll have another look this evening tho.

Cheers

Dibs
Just to clarify - normally on a moulding plane like this, the fence and depth stop are an integral part of the plane and are not adjustable. The fence is just the small flat vertical surface running the length of the plane which bears up against the left hand side of the wood being worked on. The depth stop is the similar long surface on the opposite side and at ninety degrees to the fence. When it comes down onto the surface of the work, the moulding is complete.

In this example, it looks as if the original fence has been replaced. This was normal - wooden planes can wear out! - but has been neatly done.



It's a useful plane, and a good alternative to one of these:

 
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