Two 25L unknown 'coolant' barrels, care to guess the contents?

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Peri

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Six months ago ordered 2 barrels of Exol Excelfluid RR from a supplier.

They arrived, and are labelled as RR, with slightly different batch numbers. When I came to use them, they turned out to look nothing like the fluid we normally use.

I got in touch with the supplier, and sent them the picture below. They immediately sent out two new barrels, and said they'd be in touch if they wanted the originals back.

So, it's been a few months and I've heard nothing. Before I dispose of them, can anyone hazard a guess as to what they might be?

We only use one type of cutting fluid here, so our knowledge is very limited. I know it's a long shot, but I'm hoping someone with a bit of experience can take one look and nail it - before I throw away something that could potentially be valuable.

The far left is what I expect 'normal' RR + water to look like. The other shows each barrel, one cup neat, the other with water added.

image004.jpg
 
We use a lot of RR, before that the one we used to use was also a white, milky one.
It's been suggested that the green one might be grinding fluid....:dunno:
 
We have a contract with a waste disposal firm who take all our old fluids, as well as the various liquids from the on site automotive teaching centre - getting rid of it isn't a problem, but it'd be a shame to just get rid of it when it could potentially be worth a couple of hundred quid a barrel. Standard RR is £135 a barrel, and we buy that 'cause it's cheap :D
 
May sound a funny question, but what does it smell like, Is it oily or gritty, runny or thick?
 
I haven't opened them in a 4 months, I can't remember if they have a smell - I'm off work until next Wednesday, I'll check then.

Definitely not gritty though, and the green is a lot thicker than the blue.
 
Six months ago ordered 2 barrels of Exol Excelfluid RR from a supplier.

They arrived, and are labelled as RR, with slightly different batch numbers. When I came to use them, they turned out to look nothing like the fluid we normally use.

I got in touch with the supplier, and sent them the picture below. They immediately sent out two new barrels, and said they'd be in touch if they wanted the originals back.

So, it's been a few months and I've heard nothing. Before I dispose of them, can anyone hazard a guess as to what they might be?

We only use one type of cutting fluid here, so our knowledge is very limited. I know it's a long shot, but I'm hoping someone with a bit of experience can take one look and nail it - before I throw away something that could potentially be valuable.

The far left is what I expect 'normal' RR + water to look like. The other shows each barrel, one cup neat, the other with water added.

View attachment 168689
I'm sure your supplier is buying in bulk and then down sizing to smaller containers to sell. So it is most likely one of theit other fluids miss labeled. If you send that picture to your supplier. They probably will tell you what it is. And if a cutting fluid, you can use or sell.
 
Have you tried checking on the supplier’s website/catalogue - might narrow down the options.
Unfortunately there are no pictures of their products.
Their main site lists 9 different areas they produce products for, the 'Industrial' section shows 15 subsections, and the 'Cutting fluid' area lists 11 different types of cutting/grinding oil! (Yeah, I never realised there was such a massive range) Soluble Cutting & Grinding Fluids - EXOL

(Lefley - read the first post again mate - "I got in touch with the supplier, and sent them the picture below." :) )
 
The only cutting fluid I have seen or used is white, looks like milk with a distinctive smell that gets into your cloths.
Usually, cutting fluid, a type of soluble oil, is supplied neat, and is mixed with water, whereupon the mixture becomes white. The oil makes cutting easier, and the water cools the cutting tools.
 

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