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TV Stand in Ash and Walnut

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Adam

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I decided it was time to replace the TV Stand, as it's a black chipboard monstrosity.

I started with a pile of ash. Some part machined, but mainly rough sawn.



Sadly, some of it was too wide to make it through the planer, so I ripped it down on the table saw.



Looking a lot better! I've planed and thicknessed the lot.



You start a single job, and it triggers a rash of others. Here's me finding I've filled the extractor bag with chips. :roll:



Next it's giving the edges a quick swipe with the jointer.



Nice curly shavings!



Some of it has a really nice grain - so I'm sorting through to get the optimum pieces on show....



Next up, I'm routing a profile on the end pieces...



Bit easier to see here:



Next job was biscuit jointing the panels. I've done another project since, and I've finally decided to skip this stage on panels like this. The glue is strong enough without the biscuits.



All the pieces ready to go.



Time to glue up next.



A glued end piece.



Clamping the top, bottom and shelf. You always need more clamps!



A rare outing for the smoother. Normally, I'd use the jointer.



Suffering a little from tearout, I switched to the scraper when neccasary.



Even the card scrapers got some use!



Better than the gym this - that many shavings is a real workout!



For the next stage, I found I needed to clamp the top and sides at 90 degrees. Not being able to think of a better solution, I trimmed 2 pieces of MDF, drilled holes, and used them as a reference edge. It worked really well.



I'd already decided I'd have a go with Miller dowels - so had ordered some Walnut ones, to add some nice contrast with the "whiteness" of the ash. I found the Miller drill bit was only really successfull when used with a handheld drill - using it with a bench drill just didn't seem to work.

I also found you need to vacuum the holes well, after drilling.



OK, the picture is a little staged, but in they go...



In use, I found you needed to clamp the pieces as you knocked the dowels in, as they had a tendency to seperate slightly.



When belting the dowels in with a mallet, remember not to leave you fingers in the way. This hurt for days after.



Two sides on, and wishing I'd made 4 of those MDF guides.



All square and dowelled.



Japanese saws seem ideal for trimming the excess...



Leaving not a bad finish straight from the saw...



Final finish with the block plane.



No idea why, but I added the profile to the top after it was glued up? Lack of a plan I imagine.



Not difficult though, using a bearing guided cutter. (I bought a "cheap" £20 set of 10 cutters about 6 years ago, and, other than my woodrat cutters, have yet to find fault with them, and they have all been well used.)



I've started adding a bit of Danish oil to the dowels, even though I'm not ready to finish the top yet, as it seals the end grain of the dowel



Checking the position of the shelf, so I can stand a video underneath and a DVD in the top.



I'm finishing the inside before I mount the shelf, as it'll be too difficult afterwards.



I've decided to mount it on wheels, as I'm always fiddling around with the scart connectors etc.



I've decided on a Walnut base, to cover the wheels. I'm using offcuts so I hope this piece has a nice figure/colour, as I don't have much else long enough! This piece is ready to flattening.



Walnut is a lovely wood to work, it's soft and easy to plane.



I'm using walnut offcuts, so I'm resawing this on my little bandsaw. It's about 2.5 inches deep, but taking it slowly the little saw just about coped!



I don't have enough piece long enough, so I've opted to join two together on the back. Selecting the best two from 3!



Time to sand! You can see the dowels have been pre-oiled much clearer in the picture.



Main unit, prior to finishing..



What a difference a coat of oil makes!



A close up on those dowels!



I'm biscuit jointing the base together.



Then routing a similar profile to the top and sides..



Next is to double check the placement of the wheels, so they have space to spin.



Finaly placement check!



Biscuiting the base....



Whilst cutting the matching joints on the main unit - DISASTER - I wasn't paying attention and cut right through the end. B******s. After umming and ahhing for a while about cutting out a bit and replacing it. I decided to carry on anyway - it's just be a feature to remind me to double check before plunging the cutter.



And another picture. It's upside down so it'll be on the base when I spin it over. I'm hoping it just won't be too obvious after a coat of oil.



All clamps on deck!



Almost finished - just need to oil the walnut around the base....



And again....



A quick coating of wax back in the house...



And into position it goes...



Phew, another project completed.
 

Vormulac

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Wow! Very nice! And nice to see such a thorough walk through of the project, gives those of us that are less accomplished some very useful information! :)

Well done indeed!

V.
 

Hans

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Adam,

a great job.

Having seen a picture of your shop I wouldn't believe there would be room to build a cabinet like this.

Hans
 

Chris Knight

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Adam,

That is a nice looking stand and a very good series of pix. It has almost shamed me into designing a new stand to accomodate the new TV and its gubbins that we recently acquired.
 

Philly

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Lovely Job Adam!
Just as an aside-did you consider putting a crossmember in to prevent racking? or were the dowels strong enough?
Looks real nice though. Even though you got the sander out after handplaning it! :lol: Just joking :D
cheers
Philly :D
P.s. what was the other project you mentioned?
 
A

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Lovely job Adam. I really like to see these walk through projects, very interesting seeing other peoples work :wink:

I was wondering about the top picture, is some of the stock bowed or is this just an artifact of the camera?

I am now inspired to make something similar to replace the horrible black stand that our TV came with!
 

Gill

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What a nice project, and something to remind SWMBO how useful your woodwork activities are every time she sits down to watch Corrie ;) .

Gill
 

Neil

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Very nice, and a great write-up, Adam - worth the wait on dial-up!

NeilCFD
 

Adam

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Philly":2p2la2w8 said:
P.s. what was the other project you mentioned?
Did I mention one? I've finished numerous projects through the year, just never quite get round to writing them up. That's only a selection of photos.

Here's one I'll try and write up shortly. A nice little wooden stool in ash with walnut caps!



Thankyou everyone for your kind words.

Adam
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Adam

An excellent job, well done.

Thank you for spending the time to take photos at each stage, it really makes such a difference.

Cheers
Neil
 

Woodythepecker

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Adam. very nice work. It was a shame that you had the accident with the biscuit jointer. Have you ever thought that it was payback for showing off your Lamello? :lol: :lol: Well it does not bother me, i am not jealous at all :evil: :evil: :evil: :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

I noticed that you have a Tormex, are these worth the money? The reason i ask is i have been thinking about getting one.

Regards

Woody
 

Adam

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Woodythepecker":3hfbsg9p said:
I noticed that you have a Tormex, are these worth the money? The reason i ask is i have been thinking about getting one. Regards Woody
For me, a resounding yes. I use it for everything, lathe tools, planes, chisels, etc. It's an expensive route to sharpening - by the time you have added on all the other accesories. I like it as I can do use it without to much concentration, and the results are excellent. Many turners think they are too slow for touching up an edge, but I only turn occasionally, so it's not much of an issue for me. I wouldn't be without mine, but it's worth considering other options. Originally bought a cheap Draper model - and found it a complete waste of money. It just didn't work to the the grade of sharpening I wanted - in the end I bit the bullet, bought a Tormek, and gave the Draper away to a mate who does a bit of chippy'ing and was really chuffed with it, despite my lack of confidence in it.

Tormek do a video - it might be worth getting hold of a copy - Martin @ Brimarc is the man to talk to - they are the importers.

Adam
 

Alf

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Crumbs, Adam, you've been busy since the last pic I saw of it. Looks good. I'll draw a veil over how long it took for the pics to download, 'cos I try not to sob in public... :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 

Pete W

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Very impressive - the project, and the write-up :).

Any further thoughts/tips on the Miller Dowel system; I bought one a while ago and haven't got around to using it yet. What particularly was the issue with the drill press vs hand-held? I was certainly planning to use it mounted in the drill press!
 

Shadowfax

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Very nice Adam and I did like your walk-through review very much.
Thanks for taking the time to set it all up.

SF
 

DaveL

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Adam,

Just the job. :D I love seeing what and how other people are making, thanks for taking and post the pictures. 8)
 

Adam

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Pete W":jbw70cjb said:
Any further thoughts/tips on the Miller Dowel system; I bought one a while ago and haven't got around to using it yet. What particularly was the issue with the drill press vs hand-held? I was certainly planning to use it mounted in the drill press!
It just didn't seem to work! I can't really describe but someone else here (ALF maybe? - can't remember) suggested using it in a power drill - and having completed a test piece prior to the project I'm inclned to agree. It seemed to be any wobble in your workpiece relative to a drill press caused the error to be unusually magnified in the "slopiness" of the dowel, giving a slightly oversize hole at the top, but no such issues were present when using it handheld - which is something I can't rally explain - but it worked for me :)

Hope that helps. I'd definately reccomend a test piece trial first, and also clamping it up after you've bashed the last dowel in.

Adam
 

Alf

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Wasn't me, I don't think. Funnily enough I haven't tried it in the drill press 'cos I was doing them slightly "dovetailed" if you get what I mean. I gave up trying with the cordless though, and used the old metal-bodied B&D; that's quiet a lot of hole you have to make with the big sized bit. :shock: And I'm very glad Adam and someone else (who is this mystery helper we can't remember?) laid stress on clamping everything firmly before drilling the holes or I'd have been in a pickle. I really ought to have another go with it, but the larger size BriMarc kindly gave me doesn't really lend itself to the size of stock I generally find myself using. :(

Cheers, Alf
 
A

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Adam

A lovely piece of work and a brilliant post. The TV lets the cabinet down though, time for a nice new LCD one I think.

Well done,

Roy
 

Pete W

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Alf":3fq0h9np said:
that's quite a lot of hole you have to make with the big sized bit. :shock: And I'm very glad Adam and someone else (who is this mystery helper we can't remember?) laid stress on clamping everything firmly before drilling the holes or I'd have been in a pickle.
Thanks to you both for the info. I bought the smallest size, which might help with the drilling problem since it's not nearly such a large bit; I was (am) thinking about using them as an exposed joint in box-making and other small stuff.

The clamping thing I'm sure I read somewhere before I bought the kit; I remember thinking that clamping *before* the glue-up might have some advantages for a ten-thumbed craftsman like me :)
 

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