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Tool chest challenge - saws

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Alf

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Okay folks, get your thoughts round these. Keep in mind the bandsaw will be used for ripping and resawing, but I suppose you might still be able to argue sufficient reason for a rip saw - up to you. These are the ones that are sharp and in good order, but with some work I can get others in commission, so if there's something you think is missing, speak up.

Now the limitations. There are four slots in the chest's saw till - two for hand saws and two for back saws, but the spacing is such that only a 12 or 14" back saw will fit, and my only 12" has a pistol grip handle which blocks the sliding till above (I'm starting to wonder if it's what LN call a carcass saw?). However, after some experiment I've found you can get two 10" saws in one back saw slot, but simply putting their toes in the slot and the handles resting in the corner. With a bit of modification I could make that a more secure arrangement, btw. Of course there's nothing to stop back saws being loose in the body of the chest as well, if necessary, but that'll take up valuable space for other things - such as the specialist saws. Decisions, decisions... Funny, I didn't realise I was so deficient in longer handsaws. :?


Click on the image to take you to the album.

Tony! I said click on the image... :p :wink:

One final word. No japanese saws. I have a dozuki and my westernised one, but it's no use pretending I like them so they aren't an option. Sorry, Esp. :(

Cheers, Alf

N.B. Anything counts as on topic in this thread, as long as it's got something to do with the care, feeding and using of hand saws.
 

Rob Lee

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C'mon Alf -

This is really a thinly veiled extended gloat... :p

(I do think you need a better flush cut saw...the one you have, while serviceable, is not as good as the flexible sort... especially on thinner stock)

Cheers -

Rob

(who, for some strange reason, continues to look for what's "missing", instead of offering advice on how to organise it....:) )
 
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Anonymous

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I clicked :)

For me, I would say that one deos not need many saws. I get by fine with 2 backsaws (tenon and DT), coping saw (fine blade), pad saw and flush cut saw.

In the chest then:
8" 15ppi unmarked rip backsaw
14" 13ppi Tyzack Sons & Turner backsaw
one cross cut panel saw (ripping will take place on the bandsaw)
bowsaw (because it is beautiful)
gents saw
pad saw - will definitley prove useful on occasion
Coping saw
Flush cut
 

Alf

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Rob Lee":2kcz2avg said:
C'mon Alf -

This is really a thinly veiled extended gloat... :p
S'not! Honest it's not. Not until we get to chisels and planes, anyway... :wink:

Rob Lee":2kcz2avg said:
(I do think you need a better flush cut saw...the one you have, while serviceable, is not as good as the flexible sort... especially on thinner stock)
Something like this one? (Avoiding the obvious link on purpose, just to tease :p) Okay then, why is a flexible one better? I'm willing to be convinced.

Rob Lee":2kcz2avg said:
(who, for some strange reason, continues to look for what's "missing", instead of offering advice on how to organise it....:) )
Yes, I had noticed that... :roll:

Interesting, Tony. The 8" DT eh? Okay, why the gents saw? Not necessarily disagreeing mind, just curious.

Cheers, Alf
 

Noel

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"Something like this one? (Avoiding the obvious link on purpose, just to tease ) Okay then, why is a flexible one better? I'm willing to be convinced. "
You serious Alf?

Noel
 

Alf

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GEPPETTO":2jmaivb0 said:
Tony":2jmaivb0 said:
pad saw and flush cut saw.
:oops: Excuse my ignorance: what are pad and flush saws?? :oops: :oops:

Some pics will be well accepted.
I'm having a bit of difficulty finding a decent pic of a pad saw, so I'll do one later on if no-one else steps in first. Another name for it is a Keyhole saw, which better explains its use. It's for sawing small shapes, keyholes, curved holes in a board where it's too far from the edge for the throat or reach of the bowsaw to get. They tend to buckle a lot because the blade is so thin and untempered. :(

The flush cut saw is best explained on LV's site here, thus thwarting my evil plan to thwart Rob. Heigh ho, can't be helped. :wink: :lol: Mine is a different type though, like this one.

Noel, yep, I'm serious. Not least 'cos last time I cut some plugs flush I used the gents saw... :oops: (they were near the edge, mind you, and I, er, couldn't find the flush cutting saw. Part of the reason for prompting this rationalisation :oops:)

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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Hi Alf

Gents saw for very fine work :wink: Long, long, long, long ago (30 years!!!) I built radio controlled model planes with my dad and the gents saws were de rigour for such fine work :wink:


8" saw as I like really small DT saws which seem to afford much better control


GEPPETTO

If you click on Alf's image, look at the saws on the left. The pad saw has a striaght handle and a thin blade. You can use it like you would a Jigsaw by drilling a hole, inserting the blade, and then cutting out some shape

Flush cut saw usually has a small, flexible blade with teeth set to one side only (or not at all) and is used to trim a piece, of wood 'flush' to another - prime example of this is trimming dowles or plugs that are standing proud of the surface
 

GEPPETTO

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I wish again to thank all you who never lose the patience after my questions.
I am sure I will learn a looooot of things from here. :p

P.S. About flush saw, I have always asked me how to saw the dowels without to let some signs on the wood. :roll:

Thanks again.
 
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Anonymous

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The 18" panel saw is the handiest one for work at the bench. If there is a neanderbuddy outside the chest, then full size saws, axes, mauls & chainsaws can reside out there as well. :lol: . If all saws must reside in the chest, add the thumbhole rip. The handle is good for an overhand grip which works well on the workbench.

Must have saws:
14" Tyzack CC
8" rip
Bowsaw
Fretsaw (piercing)
Flush cut

If room allows (in order)
Coping saw
Pad saw
10" CC back saw
Gents saw
 

Alf

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Okay, pad saws a go-go (click on the pic):


Roger, good list. You don't believe in having a rip toothed back saw for tenons and such then?

Cheers, Alf
 

Chris Knight

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A bit like Tony,

8" 15ppi unmarked rip backsaw
14" 13ppi Tyzack Sons & Turner backsaw
22" straight back cross cut panel saw
coping saw

and I suppose a bow saw - you can't be a proper Galoot without one.
 

GEPPETTO

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Alf":10woavt9 said:
Okay, pad saws a go-go (click on the pic):


Roger, good list. You don't believe in having a rip toothed back saw for tenons and such then?

Cheers, Alf

Thanks, I well understood by explanation
 
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Alf":3tgrk51m said:
Roger, good list. You don't believe in having a rip toothed back saw for tenons and such then?

Cheers, Alf
Yes I do! But my saw beliefs won't fit in a tool chest :lol:
One saw not in your arsenal that I think you should add (and I know you have the pieces to make one) is a stair saw for cutting sliding dovetails and odd sized dados.
 

Midnight

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I can see a ton of flak incoming for this buttttttt.....

by your own admission Alf you hate hand sawing... so why bother with em..?? I'm serious. Full size rip and crosscut saws take a bunch of effort to make em work properly; if that's not what you're into, or if the neander-buddy will be used for that... loose em... there's finite space in the box; anything that isn't gonna be active is just ballast.

As for the rest; Bow, fret / coping, flush cut and pad... no probs...

Pick your best dovetail saw and lavish all the care in the world on it. Rip and crosscut tenon saws likewise...

Personally I prefer gents saws for fine detail work, but I can understand that's not everyone's cuppa tea...

Bottom line, it's your box, your tools, your choice... choose if you dare.. :wink:
 

bugbear

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Don't see the need for a flush cut saw. I've never met a dowel yet, that I can't cut off to 1/16" with a normal back saw, then plane down the rest of the way.

BTW, I have a very early book (1905 IIRC) which recommends re-filing keyhole saw blades to cut on the pull stroke.

BugBear
 

Alf

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bugbear":51q5iit6 said:
BTW, I have a very early book (1905 IIRC) which recommends re-filing keyhole saw blades to cut on the pull stroke.
Hmm, makes you wonder why they still persist in selling them designed for the push stroke really, doesn't it? I've had the Japanese one recommended to me before, but I've yet to find one for 50p (which was the prime motivation behind owning the old fashioned type :oops: ). The Eclipse takes up heaps less room though, and I do love its style.

Mike, I think at least one x-cut handsaw is needed, no? Otherwise the tenon saw would have to get used for rough cutting timber to length, which has drawbacks. Mainly 'cos more ppi is harder to sharpen...

Cheers, Alf
 

Midnight

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Mike, I think at least one x-cut handsaw is needed, no? Otherwise the tenon saw would have to get used for rough cutting timber to length, which has drawbacks. Mainly 'cos more ppi is harder to sharpen...
I understand the argument.. heck, personally I'm heading down the handsawing road in a big way; last project was entirely hand sawn.. very few power tools used at all in fact..

But the fact remains that you hate sawing.. best tool for the job or not, if you've an alternative way to make a more accurate cross cut then why bother...??
 
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