Settlers of Catan - or cutting hexagons...

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akirk

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Or someone to engineer a perfect hex out of thin steel which you can then clamp down and use as guide for a marking knife. You could then use whatever process you want to finish up to the cut line
I have no issue with marking an accurate line - the laser engraver draws it for me very accurately indeed... it is the process of finishing up to the line that is most challenging! :)
 

CaptainBudget

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There are numerous laser profilers out there who can cut one out of 2-3mm mild steel plate for you. Modern fibre lasers should give you a hexagon with a tolerance of no more than 0.5mm. if you then use a router table with a bearing guided cutter you can use this as a template to trim them down with.

Given the part size you'll probably be hit with Minimum Order Charges but if you're flexible with material (doesn't really matter for this application) someone might be able to sneak a couple onto a nest they were cutting anyway (don't ask don't get).

I can't think of any local to you off the top of my head (we're spoilt for choice in Sheffield), but they must exist somewhere nearby...
 

pe2dave

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....
So I looked again at why the sanding hadn’t worked as well as I thought... and I think I was possibly being silly - as you can see from the photo below of the sandpaper - the piece that was on the disk on the bench sander was in poor condition and not sanding at all in the middle section - this meant that to sand the whole side I was having to move the piece left and right on the sander - introducing variability and my tilting it slightly off the sander at the end - giving a non accurate end result... so I have replaced the sanding disk, reset the mitre and tested it - giving I think a much better finish... so I will probably try some pieces like that (as well as having a go at some of the suggestions above!)

View attachment 103813 View attachment 103814


Physics says that will always happen? The centre of the disk is rotating slower than the perimeter? It would seem logical that you move the hex along the face to get even sanding (anyone with experience back this up please)
As with second video, a scrap angled 'support' might help - taped to the real hex, allow you to follow the front edge of the table on the sander?
 

Jacob

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I have no issue with marking an accurate line - the laser engraver draws it for me very accurately indeed... it is the process of finishing up to the line that is most challenging! :)
Working up to a deepish and sharply cut line is more precise than to a marked line.
Needs a normal sturdy marking knife to make a good cut, not a scratch from a scalpel style knife.
 
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Ttrees

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Is it just the one that's getting made?
It might well be a case that you can only trust the two flats end to end, as wood expands /contracts the least that way, rather than along the grain.

The sides along the grain might need to be done on the day.
mght be best gang planing/sanding and being careful about heat with the latter option.
A shooting or sanding jig for the angled parts with some kind of stable material for a fence sounds like the right way to go, not freehanding to lines but held in a jig which will stop at the line.
A tricky situation that needs a simple solution.

Edit, Another thought came to mind in this regard of the stop idea
A perfect metal plate or other stable material that buts against the fence (might need more than one)
which in turn acts as a multi point jig for positioning on your sander which is only held or captured on the end grain as said already.





Tom
 
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Stanleymonkey

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Looks great - are you going to show us the next stages with the tiles? I assume you are making this for yourself - we have just bought the junior Catan game and play as a family.
 

akirk

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Thank you for the other suggestions - I think a jig to stop it being sanded beyond the line sounds a good idea - I will have to work out how to do that...

Looks great - are you going to show us the next stages with the tiles? I assume you are making this for yourself - we have just bought the junior Catan game and play as a family.

Yes, making it for myself - it is a game I love, so it will be nice to have a more beautiful / tactile version to play with... Not tried the junior Catan version, but the simple adult version is not overly complex for children depending on age, so I would push them onto that as soon as possible... the extensions / variants can wait until later...

2021-02-17 13.02.32.jpg


pieces receiving Danish Oil - the colours really pop and work well, it was a great idea (from my godson) to have each resource in a different wood - makes it more beautiful... we will try the game with these pieces and the rest as cardboard pieces, but eventually I need to build the coast pieces / harbours / disks with numbers... will post a picture when we play with it!
 

Snettymakes

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Love this project. I love the idea of high end wooden versions of much loved (but otherwise cheap/uncrafted) products. I also find the mental challenge of figuring out how I could manufacture such things in an efficient manner. I guess you'd have copyright issues with selling these on Etsy 😞.

I've been thinking about poker chips recently. I'd like to be able to make a set of several hundred high quality wooden poker chips, with presentation/storage box of course. It's quite a challenge to figure out how to do it efficiently with a decent profit margin. It's a fun mental exercise to mull over in my down time.
 

pe2dave

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Love this project. I love the idea of high end wooden versions of much loved (but otherwise cheap/uncrafted) products. I also find the mental challenge of

I've been thinking about poker chips recently. I'd like to be able to make a set of several hundred high quality wooden poker chips, with presentation/storage box of course. It's quite a challenge to figure out how to do it efficiently with a decent profit margin. It's a fun mental exercise to mull over in my down time.

Bit of a hijack, but poker chips could use the laser readily?
With the number wanted - how to cut out in volume (hundreds) and finish the edges for handling comfortably?
 

akirk

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Thank you - yes, I have plans to make wooden versions of many of the games I love - I am quite a keen player of board games, and to use beautiful wooden versions should simply enhance that enjoyment... it started when my parents commissioned a chess table for me for my 21st (see below) which is 2 foot square in oak with walnut and sycamore inlaid squares - I designed it and have loved playing with it over the last xx :) years... while Ticket to Ride was suggested above, I might continue more along the lines of games where the pieces are relatively simple! Having said that, I have thought about making a version of these pieces but then melting gold into the engraved icons :D for the more luxurious approach!

Settlers replacement pieces are already sold on Etsy, I think they get away with it as they are replacement components, no-one is selling a full replacement, so you still need a copy of settlers for the cards / houses / cities / etc. Having said that, it is not a sensible commercial prospect unless you start to use more mass-production with CNC etc. to reduce the human time input - if I include my time then the cost of making these pieces is already in the hundreds of pounds (I am fortunate to charge out my time in my business at quite a high rate!) so I won't be doing any more than producing myself lovely sets and maybe a few as presents for family members...

Poker chips - laser would work well, but I think probably this is where CNC would work well as you could pop in a largish piece of wood and havit engrave and cut out the chips - a quick sand of sharp edges and you are good to go - you could then tumble soak them all together to apply the finish...

chess table made for me - sat in the library...
2021-02-19 11.38.43.jpg
 

Stanleymonkey

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Very crisp and minimal design. Was the glass there from the start or added as an afterthought.

We've always played dominoes as a family and carried a small tin around in my coat pocket. Don't think I've ever held a nice wooden domino though. Ludo has been a favourite for a couple of years. Wooden board but nothing amazing. This thread is giving me ideas, but I'm looking forward to seeing your finished pieces.
 

akirk

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Thank you - there is a slight style to the outside of each leg which has a slight curve to it and a line down each leg - though very subtle and you can't see it in that photo... other than that it was mainly to my design - most people my parents found worked on the principle of a normal chess board on legs - however that to my mind had several issues - one was that you put a board on a table onto which the taken pieces are placed, so building a chess table to the size of a board gives no space for the taken pieces - so I specified an extra wide area outside the board - also most makers used a very thin veneer from a roll for the board, the chap who made this used pices somewhere between 1/4 and 1/2 inch in thickness - yet no movement in 28+ years!

I have lots of plans for other things - I am making a set for Quarto, have plans for shut the box / Crockinole / dominoes / etc. - once I get a lathe I want to make my own chess set and then melt lead for the weights in the pieces... so plenty to keep me busy in the years ahead!
 

DBT85

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Very cool. I have to ask why you didn't use a router to put the cutout in the tiles though rather than the forstner bit?

Looks like a real labour of love, fantastic.
 

akirk

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Very cool. I have to ask why you didn't use a router to put the cutout in the tiles though rather than the forstner bit?

Looks like a real labour of love, fantastic.
very good question!
- didn't think of it
- not very experienced with my routers = slightly scary!
- not quite sure how I would do a circle - assume that I would need a template...

I think it would give a much better finish, but need to learn how to do it - forstner bit = very easy, pull lever down and it is done!
 

DBT85

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very good question!
- didn't think of it
- not very experienced with my routers = slightly scary!
- not quite sure how I would do a circle - assume that I would need a template...

I think it would give a much better finish, but need to learn how to do it - forstner bit = very easy, pull lever down and it is done!
Just use your forstner bit to go all the way through something, just a bit of thin bit of mdf will do. Then you can use double sided tape or find some way of clamping it if you prefer to use a top bearing bit to route the hole in your tiles.

But it is a bit more faff than just using the forstner bit I'll grant you :ROFLMAO: But does eliminate the hole in the middle. I just like making things needlessly complicated!
 

akirk

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will play with that - sounds like a good idea, and confidence with the routers will come from use...
not over complicated - a better route to a better end product! - if it works could still do it with these ones and take out the rough bottom to the hole...
 

DBT85

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If you're doing it a few times making it from something clamp able would be better as I find I have to reapply tape after each use.

You could jig it up easily enough. Use a long enough bit of mdf, get one of your tiles in the right place behind and secured with tape, and then flip it over and add some strips of something around tile to hold it in place without the need for tape. Now clamp that bit of mdf down with the tile under it. Route one and pop the next tile in and go again. As long as your tiles aren't wildly different sizes it should be OK.

For the ones you already have, you could just use a small top bearing bit if you have one to follow the existing hole you already made. Depends how deep you want to go. I think I have a 10mm bit so that's handy for shallow holes.
 

akirk

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that makes sense - and of course my tiles are identical(ish) in size :)
 

rafezetter

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Bit of a hijack, but poker chips could use the laser readily?
With the number wanted - how to cut out in volume (hundreds) and finish the edges for handling comfortably?

oh that's too easy..... hole cutter in a drill of close to desired size, stack them up on some threaded rod through that hole then either spin them up on a lathe or make up a drill powered "lathe" which is pretty rudimentary and planty of examples around to copy.

once you've cleaned them up, drill out the centres to a larger size and glue in inserts made from slices of dowel.

you could go more fancy than that with the outer rim, by notching out a crenallated pattern and filling with epoxy (befored cleaning up the edges) but that's starting to get into real work.
 

pe2dave

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oh that's too easy..... hole cutter in a drill of close to desired size, stack them up on some threaded rod through that hole then either spin them up on a lathe or make up a drill powered "lathe" which is pretty rudimentary and planty of examples around to copy.

once you've cleaned them up, drill out the centres to a larger size and glue in inserts made from slices of dowel.

you could go more fancy than that with the outer rim, by notching out a crenallated pattern and filling with epoxy (befored cleaning up the edges) but that's starting to get into real work.
I don't see how that will print the designs on the chips?
And I wouldn't like to play poker when the chips all have holes in the centre?
 
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