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I saw the Record RPMS-R at the D&M show last year, and was very impressed with the build quality. They are on offer until the end of this month - anyone out there got any experience of this table? My short list for a router to use with the table is down to the Porter Cable 7539 (good review on thids site), or the CMT 1850. Again, any views?
 

Philly

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Is that the big cast iron table one?
I bought one 18 months ago-the table is great, the clamping method is very useful for holding the router. Only downside is the fence.I don't like it. :x
Apart from that, its o.k. The cast top really damps vibration and noise and the sliding table is great.
Hope this helps
Philly :D
 

Neil

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Simon,

Give the Triton router serious consideration too - I bought the Makita 3612C, a fantastic machine and I'm sure it will go on for years, but if I could make my choice again for a dedicated table router, I would get the Triton. Check out Tony's review and also this review

Cheers,
Neil
 
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Philly, Neil - thanks for that guys. Yes, that's the cast iron table Philly, but sorry to hear you don't like the fence - did you find a way of modifying it, or just learn to live with it?

Neil - the Triton looks the part, and as it would be almost permanently mounted in a table, could well be the answer; a good bit cheaper than the PC one too.

Too much choice out there!

Cheers,

Simon
 
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Simon

Glad the triton review was useful :wink:

I have a PC and a Triton

PC for handheld and occasional table. Triton for table and occasional hand - it really is that simple
 
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Tony,

Looks like the Triton then, many thanks - easy! Just a little unsure on the table end of the setup.

Cheers,

Simon
 

Philly

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Simon
My table got "re-built".......
See here.

The table top got incorperated into a Norm style router table with an Incra fence. And yes, I do have a sliding table going cheap...... :roll: :lol:
Cheers
Philly :D
 
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Philly,

That's pretty impressive! I have always fancied making a Norm job one of these days, but something off the shelf will have to do for the time being - the day job takes up too much of my time; until I retire and can stuck into woodworking. Thanks anyway.

Cheers,

SImon
 

RogerS

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Neil

Why would you choose the Triton over the Makita for table use?

I read this review on the Triton and one of the negatives mentioned was...

When some routers are used in tables, the power switch is left on and the user turns the tool on and off via an external switch on the router table cabinet. If your use would fall into this category be aware that under these conditions the router cannot be automatically shaft-locked for above the table bit changes.

.....which seems to me to negate one of the alleged advantages.

Full review here http://benchmark.20m.com/reviews/TritonRouter/TritonRouterReview.html


Tony - any comments? I did find your review very informative and enlightening.
Cheers Roger
 

Jake

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Whoever wrote that hasn't thought it through. If you are using an external switch, that doesn't prevent you from using that to switch on and off usually, but using the switch on the router body when you want to change bits.

edited to not be quite so rude
 

RogerS

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But isn't there some sort of fancy gizmo with the shutter on the on/off switch that prevents you changing the chuck unless it is in the 'safe' position ie OFF.
 

Jake

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The fancy gizmo is the mechanism that automatically locks the spindle when it is at full extension, so changing bits is a one-handed operation. It won't lock automatically at full extension if the power switch is on. That seems sensible to me! I'm at work, so I can't go see if the mechanism is actually dependent on switch position or on the presence of power. However, even if it is dependent on the switch position, that just means that you have to turn the (router body) power switch off as and when you want to change bits. Still easier than fiddling around with two spanners, especially when the triton collet pops up all the way through the table. In between router bit changes, you can switch with an external switch all you like. The triton doesn't have one of those annoying no-volt or deadman's switches, which is a bonus.

This thing is so well thought through, it seriously has little rival as a table router IMHO.
 

Neil

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Roger Sinden":29f15cz3 said:
Neil

Why would you choose the Triton over the Makita for table use?
Hi Roger,

The killer features for me are the coarse/fine adjust, the fact that all the vents are on top of the router (so when it is table-mounted, there will be less dust getting into the workings) and the fact that the collet protrudes sufficiently to get a spanner on it, so no need for an Eliminator chuck. I'm not fussed about the auto-collet-lock as I've never had any trouble with this on the Makita anyway (its a one-spanner change in common with most pro-level routers), but I think Jake pretty much covered that it isn't a problem anyway.

Cheers,
Neil

<edit> I've just seen your other post about the £20 3612C - yer jammy so-and-so :p - so I should just qualify this by saying that the Makita is an excellent table router, it is just that given the chance again to choose between them at the same price :p I would choose the Triton this time. Your 3612C will be fine in the table, and very nice hand-held as well 8) \:D/
 

ike

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Simon,

I have had this table for a few years. Mine was badged by the long defunct Woodcut Trading Company. It also lives as a Ryobi. I use a Hitachi M12V on it. Why a Hitachi? Read on, but it's a simple yet powerful and virtually guaranteed bombproof IMO.

Great table - very nicely ground iron. I think the fence is OK - it has fine ajustment on both cheeks, although it is let down by poor holddown clamps. However, I took this table and made a number of simple and inexpensive improvements including the following,

I had the local machine shop mill a 180mm diameter recess to locate my router base just 6mm under the top. I don't need router extensions even on the shorter shank cutters.

I made a fine height adjuster - along lines of a Router Raizer but without top adjustment, for a couple quid. The Hitachi is ideal for fitting a Router Raizer (if you can afford one).

I made some new holddown brackets and sprung hold down blocks for top and side (cost: a fivers worth of 12mm studding plus assorted bits and bobs from the scrapbox/biscuit tin).

I made some finger combs for top and side. (cost: nothing - a CAD drawn self-adhesive paper template and a scrounged scrap of 8mm PVC sheet drill/jigsaw or bandsaw).

I drilled and tapped the top for a stop pin. Only thing I haven't made yet is a ring fence - naughty!

I do though have access to a Myford lathe which helped.

I'd post some pictures if I can figure how to with minimal fuss. But with these simple and inexpensive mods, you can transform a good bit of kit into a very good tool indeed.

I like Phillys take on it, but he has spent a lot more than I have, especially on the fence, and I guess his can do dovetail/finger joints. But as the saying goes, there's more than one way to skin a cat, especially if you're ever a bit skint!

cheers

Ike

PS. If you or anyone else is interested, I'll try to post some pictures (help might be needed).
 
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Anonymous

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Ike - glad to hear you like the table, although mods as you describe would be needed to bring it up to standard. Still a bit uncertain about the router itself, as several would appear to be in favour - sadly no responses on the CMT, as they also have a nice looking table in the Axminster catalogue, and of course a CMT would be ideal for a wood rat in the future, if I were to take that route. Then there's Jessem, and so it goes on!

A chap has to start somewhere, so I'll go with the record table I think, as I like the sliding table principle, and sleep on the router choice.

Great response on this site - amateurs like me need all the help we can get. Many thanks.

Cheers,

Simon
 

Alf

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Simon,

I believe the CMT is just the DeWally 625 pretending to be David "Cheap as chips" Dickinson (i.e. gone orange). In which case, yes, it's the industry "standard", but its plunge depth is a bit limited. The Triton does seem to have the table situation licked, which the 625 does not. If you're considering the'Rat, do that now, before you get set in router table ways. It's a lot easier to get the most out of it before you have too many pre-conceived ideas IMO.

Cheers, Alf
 
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Roger Sinden":2b5h0tbd said:
I read this review on the Triton and one of the negatives mentioned was...

When some routers are used in tables, the power switch is left on and the user turns the tool on and off via an external switch on the router table cabinet. If your use would fall into this category be aware that under these conditions the router cannot be automatically shaft-locked for above the table bit changes.

.....which seems to me to negate one of the alleged advantages.

Tony - any comments? I did find your review very informative and enlightening.
Cheers Roger
Hi Roger

I do not really understand the problem. I use an external switch to control the router with it switched on at the actual router all of the time.

To wind it up ready for bit change, you need the front door open anyway as the handle is used to raise it. All you have to do is switch it off (switch located next to the handle you raise it with) before winding it all the way up to the top where it will lock the shaft.

Change bit and wind it down a bit before turning it back on and closing the door.

no hastle and no problem

This is a very useful safety feature in my opinion as the router must be turned off when your hands are on the bit and collet during change-over

Roger Sinden":2b5h0tbd said:
Why would you choose the Triton over the Makita for table use?
Roger, the Triton is really made specifically for use in the table and unique in this respect. It has many novel features that make it a better proposition for the table over the Makita or probably any other router.
 

ike

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A chap has to start somewhere, so I'll go with the record table I think, as I like the sliding table principle,
Good for you Si, That sliding table, crude as it may appear compared to that on a 'proper' spindle moulder, actually works very well indeed. I've scribed, fielded and tenoned loads of frames/panels with mine. With a bit of ingenuity, those simple mods will turn it into a damn useful bit of kit.

But of course then you'll be wanting all those panel and moulding cutters - ouch!

One cutter I find most useful is from here - the 635-851 - NEW PATTERN BIT fitted with the 1-1/2" bearing from kit 791-707.

It's a whacking great lump and has to be treated with the utmost respect (especially as I haven't yet got round to making a ring fence/top guard. Very remiss I know!, but the stop pin is essential), but absolutely brilliant for edge-squaring thick stock. I profile circular oak mirror, and gothic arch window frames from templates this way, prior to using bearing guided moulding cutters.

cheers

Ike
 

RogerS

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Philly - I like your 'mods' to the Record table but your post suggests that you can't use the sliding carriage post-mod. Is that correct? Seems a great pity if the answer is 'Yes' since that feature is a big plus IMHO.

Anyone know of any other cast-iron router tables out there?

Simon - did you go for the Record router table? If so, do you like it? Any downsides?

Cheers

Roger
 

Philly

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Roger
Yes, you can use the complete top of the Record table and build a cabinet base, like mine. You can still use the table, no problem. I did away with mine as I use the Incra fence, which needed the space for its mount. I still have the sliding table handy though if I change my mind in the future.
I believe Woodford hav e a cast iron router table on their site,
Cheers
Philly :D
 

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