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Removing grubscrew from tap

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misterfish

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Our basin mixer tap in the bathroom has started leaking from the mechanism so it needs sorting. It seems that most of the single lever type taps use a generic type cassette mechnism so I thought the easiest thing would be to take out the existing one to make sure I get the correct replacement.

This should have been easy - step one being remove the control handle. But... the handle is held on with a grub screw that will not budge and the metal of the screwdriver slot is staring to burr over. I have tentatively tried to see it it will tighten a bit in order to free the threads, but no luck. The access to it is awkward needing a screwdriver parallel to the actual lever through a small hole where I can see the head of the grubscrew. I considered a soldering iron to heat it but my iron won't fit.

So any suggestions on loosening it. If I end up having to drill it out it will be really difficult as I'll need a long drill (and some luck)

Misterfish
 

flying haggis

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post up some pics if you can. Could you heat a long screwdriver with a blowtorch preferably while it is touching the screw or heat the screwdriver and apply to screw.
 

misterfish

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OK, I'll do some pictures later and post them. It might just be possible to try the blowlamp/screwdriver idea. I could also actually remove the tap if need be and try working on it in the workshop - it's just I'm trying to make it as simple as possible!

Misterfish
 

Jonzjob

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A slight asside, but when you get the replacement, if it's a nylon valve gear in the unit it may well be worth stripping it down and putting some silicon grease on the moving faces. It was a tip given to me by a plumber friend when I told him that our mixer was stiff to use. It's made the world of difference now..

For the grub screw. If you can grip the screwdriver with Mole grips or the like, put it on the grub screw and tap the end with a small hammer as you try to turn it. The combined shock and torque may well convince it that resistance is useless?

Good luck!
 

BigShot

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Apologies if I'm getting the wrong end of the stick here, but it sounds like access to the grub screw is an issue.
Is there any particular reason you can't loosen (or remove) the whole tap from the sink and turn it for the proper access?

If better access doesn't solve it, I'm the sort to drill out a little bit of the head and then screw in an extractor bit to remove the screw and then replacing it at reassembly. A tap and die solves the problem if it's a non-standard thread and a replacement is hard to get.
 

Lons

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I'd agree with Bigshot.

Grubscrew is usually in the most inaccessable place and easy to damage.

I've found by bitter experience that it's quicker in the long run to remove the tap so no, if the don't come straight off, iIdon't mess about

Bob
 

Digit

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As knapper says, failing that junk the tap, buy a new one and replace the grub screw with a hex socket head before you install the tap.

Roy.
 

BigShot

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Digit":3yknhbwh said:
As knapper says, failing that junk the tap, buy a new one and replace the grub screw with a hex socket head before you install the tap.

Roy.
Good thinking, that.
Noted for future reference.
 
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