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OSMO application technique

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Trevanion

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transatlantic":30h98761 said:
Specifically not a flat surface
Sorry! It helps to read the original post, doesn't it! :lol:

I'd say apply it as thin as possible whichever way you prefer and avoid excess, denib lightly with some grey scotchbrite pads in between. I like to brush it on fairly thin on the first coat and then use lint-free cotton rags for subsequent coats, denibbing in between with the scotchbrite.

I've never tried spraying it, might be worth a go one day.
 

ED65

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Mrs C":1gdkq0q9 said:
I have tried varnish, but always ended up with a run that I didn’t spot and gave a bit of a ‘flat’ finish.
This is why so many fall in love with applying varnish in the standard wiping-varnish method where you wipe away the excess. During application runs and drips are inevitable, but are all taken care of at time of application.

It's practically impossible to get a bad result with wiping varnish just as you describe with Osmo, and anything from a close-to-the-wood look and feel through to a full varnish coat can be achieved, plus any level of sheen from matt to full gloss, all from the one tin. Cheap as chips, most versatile finish going; oil-based poly might be worth another look.
 

woodbloke66

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transatlantic":36ejk9ez said:
I don't really see how you can get a think coat with a brush, it's thick stuff. At least not thin enough to not have to wipe off.
It is thick and gloopy stuff but I prefer to use thinned down about 60/40 with white spirit - Rob
 
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woodbloke66":5a7uq6zk said:
transatlantic":5a7uq6zk said:
I don't really see how you can get a think coat with a brush, it's thick stuff. At least not thin enough to not have to wipe off.
It is thick and gloopy stuff but I prefer to use thinned down about 60/40 with white spirit - Rob
Key bit of information there!

Really though? 60/40? thats quite the thinning.
 

Mrs C

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ED65":43rljb3r said:
Mrs C":43rljb3r said:
I have tried varnish, but always ended up with a run that I didn’t spot and gave a bit of a ‘flat’ finish.
This is why so many fall in love with applying varnish in the standard wiping-varnish method where you wipe away the excess. During application runs and drips are inevitable, but are all taken care of at time of application.

It's practically impossible to get a bad result with wiping varnish just as you describe with Osmo, and anything from a close-to-the-wood look and feel through to a full varnish coat can be achieved, plus any level of sheen from matt to full gloss, all from the one tin. Cheap as chips, most versatile finish going; oil-based poly might be worth another look.
Does this work with the quick drying stuff as well? I am about to do some cupboard shelves so might be worth another go.
 

woodbloke66

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transatlantic":1zghv5vx said:
woodbloke66":1zghv5vx said:
transatlantic":1zghv5vx said:
I don't really see how you can get a think coat with a brush, it's thick stuff. At least not thin enough to not have to wipe off.
It is thick and gloopy stuff but I prefer to use thinned down about 60/40 with white spirit - Rob
Key bit of information there!

Really though? 60/40? thats quite the thinning.
Agreed, it is quite thin but it's only a rough guestimation; once it's thinned it goes on much more evenly and in my experience at least, dries to a dead flat surface with no brush marks whatsover. I'm currently using up a small tin mixed with half matt, half satin Osmo plus a goodly dollop of white spirit - Rob
 

ED65

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Mrs C":b842vkw6 said:
Does this work with the quick drying stuff as well?
Isn't the quick-drying stuff all water-bourne? If the directions say to clean brushes with water, no.
 

Jacob

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My new table top post1326616.html#p1326616 developed a hump!
I guess it was too near the radiator, which has been on full blast, and dried out more from the unsealed underside against the Osmo sealed top. It had been quite stable in the less well heated workshop .
Loosened the buttons, thoroughly wetted the underside and it has slowly moved back to flat. Phew! If it doesn't go the last few mm I might have to pull it in with more buttons.
I presume it will dry more slowly from the top but eventually reach equilibrium. Didn't have a prob with earlier version but maybe different time of year with no CH.
 

Horsee1

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Jake":4t8oyi35 said:
Horsee1":4t8oyi35 said:
It is great for keeping the finish nice and natural in colour though, no yellowing at all.
Time will sort the yellowing out (given passage of itself).
This is true. Nice for it not to happen in front of my own eyes though.
 

Horsee1

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Simon89":3uhgked7 said:
I’ve been quite ‘relaxed’ with my application technique using anything from offcuts of 3way stretch carpet (for lining campervans), brushes, slopping it around with a finger or an off cut of a rag. I’ve found it to be quite forgiving, but have unsurprisingly noted pigment being left in areas with a deeper grain. Is the removal of excess oil perhaps more important than the application?
I am blaming the build up of excess oil for pigment build up rather than application technique. Having said that, if it’s pigment in the grain it blows my theory out the water a bit.

Best results I’ve had is on birch ply as flat panels yet to be assembled.
Foam roller first coat, don’t go mad removing excess
Knock back with 240 sandpaper and then apply with a rag, remove excess with a clean rag.
Repeat to build coats if desired.

As you say, it is quite forgiving!
 

RogerS

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I find that you get the best results with Osmo if you leave it on the shelf in the shop and go and buy something different. I can't stand the stuff ...or indeed anything oil-based especially if its a light wood like birds' eye maple.
 

woodbloke66

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RogerS":dc8kwsam said:
I find that you get the best results with Osmo if you leave it on the shelf in the shop and go and buy something different. I can't stand the stuff ...or indeed anything oil-based especially if its a light wood like birds' eye maple.
You're one of the very few that don't like it Rog but for lighter woods you need Osmo Raw; the stuff 'ordinaires' is not suitable for lighter coloured timbers - Rob
 

Jacob

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woodbloke66":evfre1g0 said:
RogerS":evfre1g0 said:
I find that you get the best results with Osmo if you leave it on the shelf in the shop and go and buy something different. I can't stand the stuff ...or indeed anything oil-based especially if its a light wood like birds' eye maple.
You're one of the very few that don't like it Rog but for lighter woods you need Osmo Raw; the stuff 'ordinaires' is not suitable for lighter coloured timbers - Rob
Seems OK on my sycamore table top. Osmo Matt finish left over from a flooring job. Looks very nice, no darker than Danish oil or colourless wax polish.
The only problem I had was change of room temp meant it dried out quicker from underneath and caused a hump, which is going down slowly. Next time I'll do both sides.
 

woodbloke66

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Jacob":2dr0pxjd said:
Seems OK on my sycamore table top. Osmo Matt finish left over from a flooring job.
RogM and I did some tests a while back on the various types of Osmo. We both found that Osmo Raw is better on whiter woods as it contains a white pigment of some sort; when applied to oak or walnut (say) it tended to 'kill' the natural colour of the timber rather than enhance it. You may find that over time, the Matt Osmo may cause the sycamore to go a 'familiar' shade of yellow - Rob
 
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