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OSMO application technique

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How do you guys apply OSMO? specifically on something that isn't a simple flat surface.

I generally have been using a sponge brush to apply a layer, waiting 15 minutes and wiping the excess off with kitchen roll. But on something like a small box, I find it difficult to wipe off the excess without actually picking it up, ... but then you get markings from fingers/gloves.

I do use a board with upturned nails to apply the initial layer, but again, difficult to get in all small corners to wipe off the exess without picking it up.

Just done a quick google and I have noticed that people (Matt Estlea, Peter Parfitt) recommend using the Scotch-Brite non abrasive pads, so am going to order some and give them a try. The idea being that you apply a tiny amount to the pad and work it in, as opposed to applying a thick layer and wiping off.

Am I still going to have issues getting into the corners though?

https://www.ribstore.co.uk/products/3m- ... 8249531492
 

AndyT

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The first time I used Osmo was when a friend was putting it onto some framed and panelled doors with applied mouldings. He told me to put it on with my fingers, which I did.

Since then, I've used a brush (which is what Osmo suggest on the can), a sponge brush and a bit of rag.

They all work.

If you get big drips on an internal corner, use a small artist's brush to wipe off.

It's pretty forgiving stuff and soon blends together without showing marks.
 

Steve Maskery

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I've just finished my wardrobe with Treatex, which is a similar product. I used a foam roller, but they are big flat panels. As Andy says, it doesn't really matter how you get it on, just get it on.
The more important q is not How? but How Much? Less is definitely more and, especially in the winter, diluting it a bit not only makes it go further but makes it easier to apply and quicker to dry.
 

Jacob

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Just done a table top. Brush it out thinly, study very carefully for drips and puddles and brush them out. You may need a bright lights to see them - you have to catch the reflection. Have another go after 20 minutes or so - just for the drips.
It looks messy with brush strokes when you first put it on but they disappear without trace and leave a very nice finish - well they did on sycamore anyway. Easy to overwork it - best to let it take care of itself.
 

Mrs C

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I only use Osmo and used to use a brush, then went to cloth, then went to the non abrasive pads. With each change the amount of sanding between coats got much much less, with the non abrasive pads only requiring a very light rub over with very fine paper. I find the less you put on the better finish you get.

My only reservation is the pads are quite expensive and only really last once so I am mean and chop them up into small bits. Any pointers as the best place to get them greatfully received.
 
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Mrs C":f1mqar5y said:
I only use Osmo and used to use a brush, then went to cloth, then went to the non abrasive pads. With each change the amount of sanding between coats got much much less, with the non abrasive pads only requiring a very light rub over with very fine paper. I find the less you put on the better finish you get.

My only reservation is the pads are quite expensive and only really last once so I am mean and chop them up into small bits. Any pointers as the best place to get them greatfully received.
Do you wipe off the remaining? or do you not put so much on as to have any excess?
 

Lons

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I've just about finished a couple of small simple carvings and want to keep them as light as possible so have been toying with the idea of using Osmo raw 3044 I have left over from a previous project however that was flat, these are definitely not and I have similar concerns about build up in the crevices.

I'm very reluctant to risk spoiling many hours of work by using the wrong product or application method. All my previous carvings are sealed and waxed which has darkened them so watching how you get on with great interest.
 

basssound

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Cromwells sell the none abrasive pads, I bought 4 for around £9, expensive but other than this oak staircase I'm building, I don't see when I'll be applying 3044 raw again.
 

Mrs C

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transatlantic":1ijhi6cv said:
Mrs C":1ijhi6cv said:
I only use Osmo and used to use a brush, then went to cloth, then went to the non abrasive pads. With each change the amount of sanding between coats got much much less, with the non abrasive pads only requiring a very light rub over with very fine paper. I find the less you put on the better finish you get.

My only reservation is the pads are quite expensive and only really last once so I am mean and chop them up into small bits. Any pointers as the best place to get them greatfully received.
Do you wipe off the remaining? or do you not put so much on as to have any excess?
I have one pad for applying which eventually becomes saturated, again less is more and I try to ‘rub it in’ rather than ‘paint it on’. I then have a second clean pad and wipe over and remove any excess, but typically this second pad will stay quite clean. Osmo is fab as I think it’s probably quite difficult to get a bad finish regardless of how you apply it. I have tried varnish, but always ended up with a run that I didn’t spot and gave a bit of a ‘flat’ finish.
 

Roland

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My observations are confined to Osmo Poly 3032, which I’ve used for guitars and childrens’ toys. For toys I’ve mixed in oil paint pigments, and then applied thinly with a brush. Two or three thin coats build up an opaque layer. By applying it thinly I’ve not had to wipe any off. Between coats I de-nib with 0000 wire wool.

For guitars the process is different. The first coat is rubbed in with a rag, and any excess is wiped off after a few minutes. Subsequent coats are applied using 0000 wire wool, with any excess being wiped off with a rag. Besides de-nibbing the wire wool helps to bring out the grain. My conclusion, by no means confirmed by any evidence, is that iron particles from the wire wool lodge in the grain.
 

Chrispy

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When oiling v-carved lettering etc. I will use a stiff brush to coat well let it soak in for a bit then wipe off as much as possible but then use the air line to blow the carving clean then wipe off the surface again! Seems to work for me.
 

woodbloke66

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Jacob":fkuu1pzt said:
Just done a table top. Brush it out thinly, study very carefully for drips and puddles and brush them out. You may need a bright lights to see them - you have to catch the reflection. Have another go after 20 minutes or so - just for the drips.
It looks messy with brush strokes when you first put it on but they disappear without trace and leave a very nice finish - well they did on sycamore anyway. Easy to overwork it - best to let it take care of itself.
Bang on the money. Apply thinly with a brush, leave it alone and the brush strokes simply disappear. I generally leave it overnight and apply a second coat, de-nibbing the first with a worn bit of 320g or similar - Rob
 
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woodbloke66":103byr2i said:
Jacob":103byr2i said:
Just done a table top. Brush it out thinly, study very carefully for drips and puddles and brush them out. You may need a bright lights to see them - you have to catch the reflection. Have another go after 20 minutes or so - just for the drips.
It looks messy with brush strokes when you first put it on but they disappear without trace and leave a very nice finish - well they did on sycamore anyway. Easy to overwork it - best to let it take care of itself.
Bang on the money. Apply thinly with a brush, leave it alone and the brush strokes simply disappear. I generally leave it overnight and apply a second coat, de-nibbing the first with a worn bit of 320g or similar - Rob
I don't really see how you can get a think coat with a brush, it's thick stuff. At least not thin enough to not have to wipe off.
 

Jacob

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transatlantic":ip9u63q6 said:
woodbloke66":ip9u63q6 said:
Jacob":ip9u63q6 said:
Just done a table top. Brush it out thinly, study very carefully for drips and puddles and brush them out. You may need a bright lights to see them - you have to catch the reflection. Have another go after 20 minutes or so - just for the drips.
It looks messy with brush strokes when you first put it on but they disappear without trace and leave a very nice finish - well they did on sycamore anyway. Easy to overwork it - best to let it take care of itself.
Bang on the money. Apply thinly with a brush, leave it alone and the brush strokes simply disappear. I generally leave it overnight and apply a second coat, de-nibbing the first with a worn bit of 320g or similar - Rob
I don't really see how you can get a thin coat with a brush, it's thick stuff. At least not thin enough to not have to wipe off.
You will see how if you try it. Brush it on, leave it, brush strokes disappear. It's kind of idiyot proof.
Puddles and drips may leave a trace if not attended to.
 
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Jacob":u8krns85 said:
You will see how if you try it. Brush it on, leave it, brush strokes disappear. It's kind of idiyot proof.
Puddles and drips may leave a trace if not attended to.
I have tried it, that is what this post is about. Although I did use a foam brush, not sure if that changes anything.

I think your idea of a thin coat is different to mine (and probably other peoples). When people are rubbing it on with a cloth, or non-abrasive pad, there is nothing to wipe off, it is that thin. You simply cannot get that with a brush.

The fact that you say it has brush strokes suggests its not a thin coat.
 

Jacob

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transatlantic":2aozhxzi said:
...
The fact that you say it has brush strokes suggests its not a thin coat.
But thin enough. As I said it's fairly fool proof and over working it may gain nothing.
 

Horsee1

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@lons,

I found when using the osmo raw i’ve ended up with build up of the white pigment in any corners I’ve not managed to buff the excess from. I was probably a bit sloppy in my application though.
It is great for keeping the finish nice and natural in colour though, no yellowing at all.
 

Simon89

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I’ve been quite ‘relaxed’ with my application technique using anything from offcuts of 3way stretch carpet (for lining campervans), brushes, slopping it around with a finger or an off cut of a rag. I’ve found it to be quite forgiving, but have unsurprisingly noted pigment being left in areas with a deeper grain. Is the removal of excess oil perhaps more important than the application?
 

Jake

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Horsee1":1b47r2ez said:
It is great for keeping the finish nice and natural in colour though, no yellowing at all.
Time will sort the yellowing out (given passage of itself).
 

Trevanion

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I'm fairly certain I've seen someone apply the stuff on a flat surface with something like a window squeegee, no brushing just spreading it out.

Looking online, Osmo actually sell a spreader for the oils.
 

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