Mitre station stop blocks

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Lazurus

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Currently putting together a mitre saw station and I wish to install some stop blocks on Tee tracks. Having never used Tee tracks can I have an idiots guide on what size is most popular and a quick install guide. The top is 19mm eucalyptus ply so assume route out and fix down? Also any good ideas for a dust hood or dust collection system as mitre saws are notoriously poor for dust collection?
 

Fidget

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Can't help on the dust extraction I'm afraid.

This is what I have done for my mitre saw station
20220131_121530.jpg


It's a bit of 3x2 planed flat and screwed from underneath. The rule and T track were bought from China. It's all very stable and accurate
 

Doug71

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I think if you routed the T track into the top you would soon get fed up of it filling up with sawdust so I would suggest mounting it on some kind of fence like Fidget.

I prefer a flip stop to a stop block so it can be quickly flipped out of the way but guess that is down to personal preference.
 

MikeK

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I built a modified version of the Jay Bates miter saw workstation with 19mm plywood and used the hinged table extension idea from DIYTyler. The T-track is made from two sections of 915mm Veritas T-track and the Starrett 1/2" x 12' Right-to-Left Imperial/Metric adhesive steel rule.

I routed a channel in the face of the workstation to fit the T-track. Then I drilled and countersunk 3mm holes in the part of the T-track that will be covered by the Starrett tape. The T-track is attached to the workstation face with 3x20mm screws every 100mm along the length of the track. There is a gap between the workstation table and the stop block to allow for any sawdust that escapes.

Miter-Stop-1.jpg



Most of the work can be done along the 1200mm of the main table, but I have a hinged extension that can be raised to add an additional 800mm of support.

Miter-Stop-2.jpg



Miter-Stop-3.jpg



If I need to measure closer than 440mm to the blade, I have another flip out track that will allow me to get as close as 300mm.

Miter-Stop-4.jpg


It's not an ideal solution because the four rare earth magnets used to hold the extension in place are not as strong as I hoped they would be. As long as the stop block straddles the hinged joint, the extension is stable and accurate.

Miter-Stop-5.jpg



The stop block is much larger than it needs to be, but I made it from three layers of 19mm cutoffs. The miter saw fence and table are proud of the workstation by about 2mm on each surface, so the stop block has to be large enough to accommodate the offset and still be square. The stop block is attached to the T-track with a M6x60 carriage bolt, a washer and a M6 knob. I had to file two flat spots into the edge of the bolt head so it would fit in the track.

Miter-Stop-6.jpg



Miter-Stop-8.jpg


The back of the block has two hardwood strips that fit in a dado in the block and ride in the track. The cursor is a hair from a bristle brush glued to a piece of scrap 2x25mm aluminum strip. Ignore the two holes in the upper left corner. They were practice holes to see if I could safely use a carbide end mill in my drill press to cut the hole for the plastic insert (it worked). The strip is recessed into the back of the stop block so it does not touch the T-track.

I cut a small piece of clear plastic to fit in the rectangular opening, but did not do a very good job of gluing it in place with CA glue. I tried to glue the plastic on all four sides, but realized too late that it only needed to be secured in two opposing corners. The plastic is used to protect the cursor.

Miter-Stop-7.jpg
 

Lazurus

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That's brilliant Mike, thanks for such a detailed response, you have given me every thing I need going forward - appreciated.
 

harryc

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Currently putting together a mitre saw station and I wish to install some stop blocks on Tee tracks. Having never used Tee tracks can I have an idiots guide on what size is most popular and a quick install guide. The top is 19mm eucalyptus ply so assume route out and fix down? Also any good ideas for a dust hood or dust collection system as mitre saws are notoriously poor for dust collection?
Have a look at Rag n Bone Brown on YouTube will give you some ideas with what he did with his mitre station.

Re having a permanent raised stop block in your top will mean you lose the use of that section of top compared to the T- track routed into your top.
 

Sporky McGuffin

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I had a few goes at making my own.

My talents are limited, but it's also really, really tricky. Hence buying one that just works and lets me get on with chopping things into smaller pieces.
 

Doug71

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MikeK mentions it but if you do go for the fence option it is best to set the fence back a few mill from the front of your mitre saw fence or else you can run in to problems cutting wood which is bent.
 

Fidget

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I built a modified version of the Jay Bates miter saw workstation with 19mm plywood and used the hinged table extension idea from DIYTyler. The T-track is made from two sections of 915mm Veritas T-track and the Starrett 1/2" x 12' Right-to-Left Imperial/Metric adhesive steel rule.

I routed a channel in the face of the workstation to fit the T-track. Then I drilled and countersunk 3mm holes in the part of the T-track that will be covered by the Starrett tape. The T-track is attached to the workstation face with 3x20mm screws every 100mm along the length of the track. There is a gap between the workstation table and the stop block to allow for any sawdust that escapes.

View attachment 128324


Most of the work can be done along the 1200mm of the main table, but I have a hinged extension that can be raised to add an additional 800mm of support.

View attachment 128325


View attachment 128326


If I need to measure closer than 440mm to the blade, I have another flip out track that will allow me to get as close as 300mm.

View attachment 128327

It's not an ideal solution because the four rare earth magnets used to hold the extension in place are not as strong as I hoped they would be. As long as the stop block straddles the hinged joint, the extension is stable and accurate.

View attachment 128328


The stop block is much larger than it needs to be, but I made it from three layers of 19mm cutoffs. The miter saw fence and table are proud of the workstation by about 2mm on each surface, so the stop block has to be large enough to accommodate the offset and still be square. The stop block is attached to the T-track with a M6x60 carriage bolt, a washer and a M6 knob. I had to file two flat spots into the edge of the bolt head so it would fit in the track.

View attachment 128330


View attachment 128332

The back of the block has two hardwood strips that fit in a dado in the block and ride in the track. The cursor is a hair from a bristle brush glued to a piece of scrap 2x25mm aluminum strip. Ignore the two holes in the upper left corner. They were practice holes to see if I could safely use a carbide end mill in my drill press to cut the hole for the plastic insert (it worked). The strip is recessed into the back of the stop block so it does not touch the T-track.

I cut a small piece of clear plastic to fit in the rectangular opening, but did not do a very good job of gluing it in place with CA glue. I tried to glue the plastic on all four sides, but realized too late that it only needed to be secured in two opposing corners. The plastic is used to protect the cursor.

View attachment 128331

Well now I just feel inadequate :(
 

Lazurus

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One further question I see there appears to be two sizes of Tee track, which is the most common?
 

MikeK

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That's brilliant Mike, thanks for such a detailed response, you have given me every thing I need going forward - appreciated.

Thanks!


Well now I just feel inadequate :(

No need to feel inadequate. The only original (as far as I know) part of my stop block setup is the cursor. The rest was borrowed by others.

I do like your version of the FastCap 10 Million Dollar Stick.
 

MikeK

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One further question I see there appears to be two sizes of Tee track, which is the most common?

I think you will find there are dozens, or more, of different sizes of T-track. I chose the Veritas because it was in stock and worked for my purposes.
 

deema

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There is always the option of cutting the T slot into the wood. A router T cutter is a much cheaper option than T track.
For instance, a hardwood strip inset into your ply that has the T slot cut into it.
 

Fidget

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No need to feel inadequate. The only original (as far as I know) part of my stop block setup is the cursor. The rest was borrowed by others.

I do like your version of the FastCap 10 Million Dollar Stick.

I was only kidding Mike, I was just in awe of your setup :)

My 3D printed version of the $10m stick was badly designed by me in my early days of Fusion 360, but it works. One day I might give it another go
 
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