Let's see how many came name this tool...

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graham88

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10 Aug 2022
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Dorset
Got asked to make a new handle for a tool I've never seen before. Original handle had cracked down the middle and was being held together with gaffa tape - quite valiantly I might add. Original was made from ash which is quite fortunate because I have a fair amount of it in stock. I initially found the centre line of the tenon that mates with the tool head and turned it on the lathe. I then traced the profile onto the square edges and cut it out roughly with the bandsaw and then rounded the shape down further with a belt sander before getting the end result using a spokeshave. Finish is tung oil. Not normally a project I would get involved in but I'm quite pleased with the result.

So the big question is, can anybody name the tool or even the trade that uses it? Was quite interesting to hear about it and it's use from the owner.


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Out of interest why is it designed like that, I would have thought it would just be flat.
I think a lot of them are. I was given the job because the thatcher was struggling to find a replacement with the angle on the handle and decades of use meant that he just wasn't getting along with straight ones. I think it is also used in a combing action sometimes so a flat tool would probably be a pain. I'll ask today when he picks up.
 
Out of interest why is it designed like that, I would have thought it would just be flat.
Because it's not applied square to the end of the reed, its used to a glancing blow following the roof profile - so needs something to catch the ends of the reeds. Traditional wooden versions have a serrated face (easier to make?), but the metal varients seem to have gone for a gridded or honeycomb pattern.
 
Because it's not applied square to the end of the reed, its used to a glancing blow following the roof profile - so needs something to catch the ends of the reeds. Traditional wooden versions have a serrated face (easier to make?), but the metal varients seem to have gone for a gridded or honeycomb pattern.
That makes perfect sense, thank you.
 

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