Lathe Tool Storage Rack

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custard

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Quick question for the forum. I want to install some wall mounted tool racks for lathe tools, not chucks but just the normal handled tools like skews and gouges.

This will be fairly close to the lathe, so I don't want anything with shelves that will get buried in dust and shavings.

That might imply a magnetic tool rack, but I've yet to find magnetic racks strong enough for heavier tools.

Anyone got any photos/links/suggestions? Could be either magnetic (if you've found a good system) or non magnetic, but something that's easy to access yet secure, and will tend to shed shavings.

Thanks.
 
I have tools stored behind the lathe in a thin (in terms of depth) shelf with a hole for each tool. I've not found it to get that badly covered in shavings.

A series of independent holders shaped as a flat beam with a ring hole at one end might reduce the likelihood of shavings getting caught, but would be a lot more work than a single shelf with holes. E.g. something a bit like this:

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my plan is for a rolling trolly, a cross between a lectern and a toolbox.....
there will be cutouts in the door as well as the fixed wall a bit like opening a large book with a Lidil mangnet rail for insurance.....laying back at say 10-15 degrees with no bottom to keep turnings in....
Plus some sort'a rechargeable battery led spot/flood lighting system attached....
built on a cupboard or drawer unit for the heavy bits n bobs....
but I have the room for this luxury....plus his n her lathes...hence the wheels.....
 
I just got a long bit of wood and drilled appropriate sized holes/spacing for the different tools. I have a separate holder for large tools. These are just functional items for me, but could be made to look much nicer with a bit of effort. About once a month I give the whole workshop a blast with high pressure air to clear any dust off shelves and tools.

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A series of independent holders shaped as a flat beam with a ring hole at one end might reduce the likelihood of shavings getting caught, but would be a lot more work than a single shelf with holes. E.g. something a bit like this:

View attachment 141092
Good luck getting a screw-driver in to those screws!!
 
Good luck getting a screw-driver in to those screws!!
Cranked screwdriver, still got mine from when I needed it to fix cars in the 70's (1970s, not 1870's being as how the first patent was 1886). Pain to use though.

Back to original question, I have invested almost nothing in a tool rack, maybe a bit of wear on some spade bits and an offcut or two. The sucky end of the vacuum reaches the lathe and the tools but rarely needed for the latter. Mine is fixed low down at the headstock end of the lathe stand.

I suppose you could put the shelf at an angle to horizontal but make sure the hole sides are parallel to the Earth's axis. The tools will stay in, the shavings might fall off, both helped by gravity.

I saw some fancy threaded chuck mounts to screw to the wall. A bit of square softwood of the right diagonal does just as well. Wiggle and push first time, push thereafter.

I prefer to spend my money on things people will see or I will enjoy (wood, finishes).
 
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my plan is for a rolling trolly, a cross between a lectern and a toolbox.....
Maybe you could have electric motors, raspberry pi bassed controller, sew an rfid chip into your trousres and have it follow you around ......
 
Not elegant, but drill holes near the end of the handle and hang on any suitable pegs or hooks?
Duncan
 
I have an Axminster magnetic rack and 2 cheapies from Lidl one above the other. The axi one copes with the skews, scrapers and spindle gouges, while the doubled up Lidl ones do the bigger bowl gouges simply because they only have a very small contact area relative to the weight so they slide off a single.
Alternatively speak to the people at first4magnets, really helpful when we wanted a specific load capacity through a polymer clay overlay, then you could design your own with magnets fixed in the back of a nice piece of timber
 
I used an old 2 drawer filing cabinet as it is on wheels and put a tool rack on top for the tools. Chucks, faceplates and stuff in the drawers. Wheel it to where is handy to reach the tools when turning.
Regards
John
 
Here's my set up. It's positioned away from the line of fire of chips and dust so I don't have any big problem with that.
 

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Quick question for the forum. I want to install some wall mounted tool racks for lathe tools, not chucks but just the normal handled tools like skews and gouges.

This will be fairly close to the lathe, so I don't want anything with shelves that will get buried in dust and shavings.

That might imply a magnetic tool rack, but I've yet to find magnetic racks strong enough for heavier tools.

Anyone got any photos/links/suggestions? Could be either magnetic (if you've found a good system) or non magnetic, but something that's easy to access yet secure, and will tend to shed shavings.

Thanks.
Probably not what you want, but mine live in a hinged wooden case, which will shortly be screwed to the wall, above and behind the lathe. Its a work in progress...
 
This is my system of tool storage it rotates is only 12 inches In diameter and hold’s 16 tools and takes up very little bench space I also now know what to get rid of as we all most probably have more tools than we need?
 

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I use several djfferent makes of magnetic rack to hold my turning tools. This works well for the flat tools, but rounded shafts tend to slip until the upper surface of the rack reaches their handle..
On the other hand, I found a nifty way of keeping my tin whistled out of the sawdust on my workbench ( Yes I know it sounds sad :giggle: ) I just cut a few rings off a plastic pipe. these have a hole drilled in the front to allow for the access of a screwdriver and the back is also drilled to take a screw, so that you can then fasten them directly to the wall, or a strip of wood.
 
You could buy some of those super strong earth magnets that have a hole in the center, screw them to your chosen area and hey presto job done, they will easily take the weight of your turning tools:)
 
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