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Croyboy

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I am fairly new to turning and l am having some difficulty seeing inside a bowl when hogging out. I have tried using an old anglepoise type lamp but with little success. Just wondering what advice is out there from experienced turners?
 

Richard_C

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I use an old anglepoise style but cheapskate version, no base - its fitted to a home made bracket really close to the bed of the lathe so you can pull it over and have it virtually on the center line or push/swivel it away. Although its an old ES fitting, I have a 6w LED bulb in it rather than incandescent so its not getting hot. I've also got a random collection of spot fittings* that were in various parts of the house now scattered round the garage ceiling in addition to the original tube, so the overall lighting is pretty good.

* I rarely throw anything away knowing that if I do I will have a need for it one day. A curse or a blessing depending on how you look at it.
 

Dave Brookes

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Woodard Products do a magnetic LED light that fixes on the tool rest and shines right inside a bowl. From memory it is about 30mm by 20mm and doesn’t impede the tool at all.
Dave
 
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I find that any kind of flexible lamp often (but not always) gets in the way. I think something mounted from above would work best really.

I saw somone the other day put a small set of LED lights on the back of the tool rest, facing into the bowl. So they're basically completely out of the way.
 
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Phil Pascoe":1r4svt8b said:
https://www.charnwood.net/products/product/magnetic-28-led-flexible-light-ml28/category_pathway-129
I have this - I've not noticed its getting in the way. :D
I have that exact one. Always banging the visor on it :p

..each to their own. :)
 

Roland

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Ikea do clip-on LED lamps with bendable stalks. I clip one onto the base of the tool rest.
 

Alpha-Dave

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One thing to be careful of is that some LED units have a strobing effect, while others shine continuously (I think this is more likely to be in an array of LEDs fed from AC rather than battery powered single LEDs). This has the ultimate problem when it can make something that is spinning appears to be stationary (very unlikely as they would have to be in sync) or at least give a weird effect that is off putting.

I have:
1) a clip-on LED from Woodart Products that uses a magnet to clip onto the back of the toolrest. This is brilliant when doing bowls. Highly recommended.
2) a halogen flood light pointed at the bed of the lathe. This is on all the time when working on it and the light colour is nice to work with (low temperature, warm). This is good and cheap.
3) a halogen spotlight that is dust proof from Axminster; this is good but bulky and so has been relegated to the bandsaw. The new ones they sell are LED based, so I don’t know if they are better.
4) an LED floodlight bought from Screwfix that I intended to use to replace the halogen (because the halogen is hot is use); this is the problem one with the strobe effect, so no longer used. Do not go this route.
 

J-G

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Alpha-Dave":2aqev87j said:
One thing to be careful of is that some LED units have a strobing effect, while others shine continuously (I think this is more likely to be in an array of LEDs fed from AC rather than battery powered single LEDs). This has the ultimate problem when it can make something that is spinning appears to be stationary (very unlikely as they would have to be in sync) or at least give a weird effect that is off putting.
Any light that is driven by AC has a potential to exhibit a strobe effect - it all depends on the work being spun - but LEDs are (as far as I am aware) all driven by DC. There is a [driver] incorporated into the fitting which converts the 230/240 v AC to 12 v DC.
 

TheTiddles

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You can get a little LED torch with a magnetic base that you stick to the gouge, so it points dead down the tool. I have one, looks cheap, works fantastically.

Aidan
 

Paul Hannaby

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J-G":1kvyytic said:
Alpha-Dave":1kvyytic said:
One thing to be careful of is that some LED units have a strobing effect, while others shine continuously (I think this is more likely to be in an array of LEDs fed from AC rather than battery powered single LEDs). This has the ultimate problem when it can make something that is spinning appears to be stationary (very unlikely as they would have to be in sync) or at least give a weird effect that is off putting.
Any light that is driven by AC has a potential to exhibit a strobe effect - it all depends on the work being spun - but LEDs are (as far as I am aware) all driven by DC. There is a [driver] incorporated into the fitting which converts the 230/240 v AC to 12 v DC.
Not always true - Some LED lights are powered by a simple half wave rectified AC which effectively means the LEDs switch on and off 50 times per second, potentially leading to a stroboscopic effect. I have one in my workshop that does exactly this.

If you want bright lights for not much money. Ikea do some 1000 and 1600 lumen LED bulbs that fit ES holders. I have a couple in my workshop in a cheap anglepoise lamp and they are very bright.
 

Duncan A

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Just to confuse matters, very bright lights can wash out details or colours, making it difficult to see what's going on. They can also throw strong shadows, difficult to deal with if your eyes are not young (most of us).
Lots of lights, easily re-positioned is what I aim for.
Duncan
 
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